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The term hollowpoint for my early years meant lead tips with fairly large holes in them and that's possibly because of pistol ammo, never really paid attention till now. Now I buy bullets that have almost no hole and are entirely jacketed. Got them for use in some worn Mosin Nagants and an Enfield. Bought these http://www.grafs.com/retail/catalog/product/productId/6289 . I also have some Wolf 7.62x39 with this same type small hole in the tip. Even though Graffs talks about expansion in the add for those bullets, they do not discuss hunting use. I have noticed in some reloading data I've browsed that match grade BTHP are not to be used for hunting, only target. Can someone explain what the differences of the match verses other types of HP and what gives with the tiny hole?

Can ya tell I'm new at this?
 

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I figure that I am about to link you to more information on ballistics than you ever wanted to know, But if you read it all you will have your answer and more. http://www.frfrogspad.com/ballisti.htm

You could just skip to the end labeled " terminal ballistics" but you would miss alot.

Basically the little hole doesn't do that much, but it does help some.. the jacket thickness is more important to expansion and the jacket will have designed in weak spots to guide expansion. The hole in the bullet has more to do with where the center of gravity of the bullet is and having the CG more to the rear is a good thing for accuracy... also the hole makes it easier to have a more uniform concentric distribution of weight so you have less wobble when the bullet spins.... the shape of the bullet is important to it's ballistic coeffcient.. the pointy'er the better the faster you go.. so large meplats on pistol bulet are not as bad, as pistol bullets are slower than rifle bullets but on fast bullets large meplats cause it to slow down faster than necesary. The "hollow point" need not be open or visible .303 Brits MkVII bullets and military issue 5.54 x39 AK74 type bullets both have a holow space or a spaced filled with some light soft material like wood or aluminum in the tip to move center of gravity back towards the rear but are not designed to expend necesarily. But the long pointy nose or ogive aids the bullet in going faster longer.. anyway just read the article then you will be wise beyond your years.
 

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Good info and advice above.

Those particular type of "hollow points" are designed for punching paper at long range, not for expanding as a game-killing bullet. They will likely not expand at all from being shot into an animal, and I would not use them as such, unless there was some sort of last-ditch reason I had to (need to eat, no other ammo available). The only HP rifle bullets I happen to use are varmit bullets, and those ARE designed to expand (or more correctly, "come completely apart") on a target critter or a hard object (ground/rock/etc) so as to not ricochet.
 

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The small hole in the front of match-type BTHP bullets is also a result of a manufacturing process that keeps the bullet base smooth and consistent, which is critical for accuracy. Most military bullets traditionally were built with exposed lead at the base, having the lead core inserted into the jacket from the rear.
Some long-range pelt hunters do use the match-type bullet to minimize pelt damage. Obviously, shot placement is critical with a non-expanding bullet.
 

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AmmoSgt. Thank you for that link. Haven't read much of it yet, but loads of info there.
 
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