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Amazingly craptastic. "Nicht nummerngleich" means mismatched. What has you all hot and bothered about a bunch of mismatched and postwar-fudged rifles that have been converted into dewats or blank-firing only? At this point they have no more worth than parts value. Even the condition of these rifles is nothing special. The bulk of nice, original condition Kar.98k's is in the US.
 

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It is my believe that the bulk of interesting, original WWII K98k's are not in the US. It is my believe that they are still in Europe. Nummerngleich or not (not every K98k came "nummerngleich" out of WWII). It is my believe that they are "released by small numbers" into the international market. To keep a price high you have to present "rarity". Tons of WWII weapons are kept away from interested individual buyers to raise the price (this goes on for decades know, 99,9% of the people haven't even a clue!).
So you think 900 Euros for a mismatched Kar.98k that has been converted into a non-firing "Deko" piece is a deal? That price is roughly $1,150 US by todays currency exchange values. $1,150 will purchase a matching, original condition Kar.98k in better condition here, even on the internet where prices tend to run high. Original condition Kar.98k's changed hands at LOW prices in the US from the end of the war until roughly the mid-1980's when the collectors market began to take off. For every matching condition, original rifle in a collection here, likely 4-5 were converted into deer slayers and/or eventually parts. Prior to the collector market taking off here, these rifles were viewed as something akin to junk (like Turkish Mausers were seen 10 years ago). So, you are saying that in the more or less 40 year period following the war when these rifles were in low demand, that crafty Europeans held onto their supplies of primo collectors pieces, knowing that some day the market would shift and they would be valuable? Nope. Not buying it.
 

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I don't read German so the down side was not apparent. But the K98k codes on the sight were all very rare. They had codes like bcd/ar ZF41 models in large numbers. Then the truly rare codes like ax/ar, bcd/bnz, and single rune 1942,1943, and 1944 showed up! I was impressed with what they had available! From what I could translate not all the K98k examples were demilled. I still don't believe that all the K98k rifles of World War II have found a home in the USA. I think the military made it hard for the GI's to take home captures and the vast bulk of the K98k rifles remained in Europe or got exported to third world nations during the cold war!
I didn't see a single rifle on that site which wasn't either blank-fire only or deactivated. I also didn't see a single example listed as numbers matching. I stopped looking after about ten rifles. I try to save the word "rare" for things that one almost never sees. ax/ar, bcd/bnz--yeah rare. bcd/ar and rune rifles are uncommon (still desirable, just not in the rare category). All the Kar.98k's didn't come here but the bulk of the remaining rifles in collectible condition (matching, original condition) are here. The Europeans modified and/or destroyed the bulk of theirs. Many others went to third world nations. One other thing about that site is that most of their photos don't show much. An example of one that does show a detail is the swp 45. Their example shows a three digit serial number and defaced firing proofs. swp 45's didn't come with three digit serial numbers during the war.
 
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