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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I need a little help
I recently purchased a nice condition NO4 MK1 Enfield,

Dated M 1943
Brass butt plate
CR403 rear site
Bolt release latch present
Smooth front end
2 grove bright shinny bore
Butt stock darker and different type of wood, Walnut? marked J.C
N 22
Serial number AR 19689 number on stock ring and bolt handle match

From what I have been able to learn this is a farily common WWII Enfield.

What does the AR prefix of the serial number mean if anything.

There is a big white painted "Z" on the stock, I read in this form about ZF painted on the stock meaning condemened or not base repairable, or is the mark of Zoro :)

Just to be clear my stock is only marked only with a "Z" I have no F, is this a unit mark or a withdrawn from service for major overhall mark ?
Thank you

Jim Rouse AKA Penmon
 

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A quote from Peter Laidler on ZF markings was that "The Z means that it has been condemned at a Base workshop (that's the Z bit) as suitable only for a Factory Repair (that's the F part)".

That is the ZF together; however, I am not sure if the letters by themselves still have the same meaning. Hopefully one of the more knowledgeable members will confirm my post or correct it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Would you shoot this gun?

My fellow Enfield and military rifle lovers,

Any ideas on the mark of "z" It also has a dab of red paint on the front barrel band?

The gunsmith who sold me the rifle says it’s safe to shoot. It was at that point I ask him to test fire it, this of course is after I told him about the ZF codes and there meanings.

He in turn said he would go over the gun with a fine tooth comb and then test fire it but first he wanted to take a good “second look”. Probaly never took a first look.

Glad to see he is taking his safety to heart.

The way I see it, based on the outward and internal condition of the gun its probably as safe as any 67 year old gun made under the pressure of war, maybe safer than most, the gun looks brand new or freshly reconditioned. However with all the chatter over the ZF stock marking I am still a little nervous. That big Dam “Z” is a little disconcerting.

Would you slap it up to your cheek and pull the trigger?
Would you remove the “Z” after all the “Z” is a post issue marking and may have been done in Turkey it looks to be fairly fresh?
Unless I am restoring a gun to its original issue condition, De-bubberizing it other than a good cleaning and a stock oiling I prefer to leave well enough alone.
I am collector more than a shooter if I was to pull the trigger on this gun in the next 30 years more than 100 times I would be very surprised.
I do however want my WWII collection of period arms to function, be safe and to fairly represent the standard issued weapons of WWII.
Penmon AKA Jim Rouse
 

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