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No, not too far out with India.;) But, to be honest, if it wasn't for that PF number I wouldn't have known either. I have seen a version of the mark beneath the War Department arrow, I have a couple on bayonets in my collection, but I haven't seen that particular version before, which as you say, looks quite Indian.
 

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Right, well, here we go........

I was quite correct about Burma using the PF marking, but, evidently, so did Ireland! I was thinking about this and remembered an Irish No.9 bayonet that I have, and finding some pictures of it, lo and behold, there is the PF serial number. However, following that a perusal of Graham's book Spirit of the Pike, says on page 231, that both countries used the PF mark. However, the example shown there as being from Burma, also has the other type of the stamp below the WD arrow, only that in the book is the MR and arrow, that I have seen before and have on a couple of bayonets in my collection. Same placement, and very similar looking. maybe the same marking, but in local script?
So, I'd still go for it being Burmese!

This is my Irish example:
Wood Rectangle Door Household hardware Gun accessory


Wood Fixture Gas Tints and shades Door


Note the absence of any mark below the WD arrow on this Irish example.
 

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These are later British inspection marks, found on 50s-era items. This marking has been observed on both metal & woodwork. It’s a combination of up to 4 numbers & letters, varying by inspector. I can’t say if it is a BSA or Fazakerly mark though, it appears on both.
 

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Here’s one from my ‘52 BSA which I had handy:

Font Gas Metal Concrete Wood


I used to keep a folder of photos of this marking, but lost them all when I switched to an iPhone. At one point I owned a Long Branch with this marking on the butt socket under “‘52”.
 

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See the 4th photo in the first post:


Last photo in first post:


Several in here, see if you can spot them all! ;)

 

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Interesting, Graham only mentions Burma and Eire using the PF prefix, however, the great thing about collecting is that there is always new information coming to light!

The very similar markings on the bayonet, or two that I have are similarly placed, but are the letters MR with the arrow between them, not letters and numbers like these. Perhaps also an inspectors stamp? I seem to recall somewhere that they were an arsenal in either India or Pakistan, but due to the wars there, it has changed nationality.

Both the illustrated examples in Spirit of the Pike are also serial numbers in the 300.000 series if this is any help?

By the way, when looking for that fourth picture, my caption shows 'Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18' ? :unsure: Perhaps they are worried that young lads might discover something interesting and start seriously collecting !:ROFLMAO:
 

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The PF serial number prefix was the flavor of the day before changing over to the UF prefix.
On the bayonets it only means that bayonet was matched to a rifle having that number.

There is a long listing of PF numbers being allocated to certain places and users. Doesn’t mean every one in that range actually went there.
They only account for production numbers intended to fill a particular contract.

The markings on the bayonet are as DDog alluded to. British markings and they showed up in various places after being sold or offered as military aid.

If the number falls into the Burma contract range then it might have gone there. It may have not?
 

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PF rifle production began in late 1947, were the bayonets always numbered?
I see Fritz answered this in the Irish thread, the bayonets are considered to have been numbered in Ireland, as it was not British practice. Rifles within the Irish serial range (PF301,548 - PF405,415) also went to Burma, leading to confusion.
 
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