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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,
I'm new to the forum and new to Enfields in general.

I just acquired a no2 mk1 revolver and when inspecting the markings noticed that it doesn't have the crown mark that I see on so many others.
A friend who claims to know more than I says that the 45 mark on the top of the barrel is the original proof mark and the 53 mark on the side between the grip and cylinder is the refit year mark.
According to him that means it was likely manufactured in 45 and refit after the war in 53.

Could anyone confirm/correct that information and tell me anything additionally about the other marks I've found?

Thanks,
Travis
 

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Yep, this is a 1945 Enfield MkI** revolver that was Factory Thorough Repaired in 1953. Later revolvers did not have the Royal Cypher on the right hand side.

The Enfield makers mark is on the right side, it’s the letters EFD stacked on top of each other, right in front of the mark designation itself. The “Tons” proof is from the London Proof House, when the revolver was sold on the commercial market.
 

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Thank you for the confirmation! One additional thing that my friend mentioned was that this was a Tanker model because it was missing the hammer spur. Is that also correct?
Not necessarily. The Tank Corps requested that the hammer spur be omitted to avoid catching on parts of the tanks, and the No.2 pattern was updated to omit the spur (and eventually the single action function altogether). After that date (can't remember when), all No.2 revolvers produced would have no spur and fire double-action only, regardless of who they were being issued to; any revolvers being sent in for repair would have the spur removed per the new pattern.
 

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Thank you for the confirmation! One additional thing that my friend mentioned was that this was a Tanker model because it was missing the hammer spur. Is that also correct?
While tankers may have used the "hammerless" model, it was not specifically a tanker weapon. The "bobbed" hammer comes from the philosophy of shooting of the Brits, not teaching precise aimed fire, but more instinctive shooting. Making the hammer without the spur also saved money.

A lot of people bad-mouth this revolver, but I find mine a pleasure to shoot and it shoots at least as well as I do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
While tankers may have used the "hammerless" model, it was not specifically a tanker weapon. The "bobbed" hammer comes from the philosophy of shooting of the Brits, not teaching precise aimed fire, but more instinctive shooting. Making the hammer without the spur also saved money.
Very interesting, is there any way to determine in this was a bobbed hammer originally or if it was done during the refit?
Also, the serial number confuses me. I see ZJ255 three places (bottom of the barrel, front of the trigger guard and on the cylinder) so I assume that's the serial number but it seems really short.
Am I missing something or is that really the serial number?
 

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Very interesting, is there any way to determine in this was a bobbed hammer originally or if it was done during the refit?
Also, the serial number confuses me. I see ZJ255 three places (bottom of the barrel, front of the trigger guard and on the cylinder) so I assume that's the serial number but it seems really short.
Am I missing something or is that really the serial number?
Your revolver was built as a MkI**, meaning (among other things) the hammer is 100% correct, as it was made as DA-only. By 1945, that’s what they were making.

And yes, that is the serial, the prefix is correct for a 1945 (I had one issued to the Hong Kong Police).
 

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The bobbed hammer was standard on the production line from 1939 on... the change order was approved on 22 June 1938, and the official manufacturing instructions were changed 14 Oct. 1938.

The June 1938 Change Order also specified that No. 2 Mk. 1 pistols passing through ordinance repair thereafter were to be converted to No. 2 Mk. 1* standard (bobbed hammer and lightened trigger spring for DA-only use).
 
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