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Does anybody know if Ecuador issued a mauser to its military? I came across some Ecuadorian 8mm mauser ammo recently, and decided to google to see if I could find the rifle they shot it out of but came up with nothing. Just curious since I really love the crest designs on all the other South American mausers. If they never issued a mauser, I am guessing the ammo was intended for machine guns or perhaps post war German confiscated and distributed arms?
 

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In 1936 Ecuador purchased 30,000 VZ24 rifles with VZ23 long bayonets. They were taken from Czechoslovak Army reserve and later replaced by ZB. They did not have an Ecuadoran crest and have never been sold as surplus.
 

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Wow thanks so much guys, the fact nothing was ever imported from them explains the lack of information on google. Too bad about not having their own unique crest, I love the South American receiver crests

If their mausers were unmarked, how can you tell that Gew88 was from there? The rack paint on the stock?
 

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The Gew88s were obtained from German Surplus Wholesalers in the early 1900s, and were "un-reconstructed 88s" using the packet clip. Mostly early dates. Germany supplied Patrone 88 up till WW I, then the Equadoreans bought replacement Barrels and Ammo from ZB ( Czechoslovakia). For some reason, the Czech Barrels were VERY tight ( both Bore AND Grooves). In the 1930s, they bought the aforementioned Vz24s from ZB ( Recycled Army Rifles) and also "S" Patrone from "Z" (Povaska Bystrica) of ZB,( Formerly "Circle-M" of Bratislava;) in 1955, The Argentinian FM factory supplied New ammo,( again "S" type) with a "AA 55" headstamp.

The Equadorean Gew88s were never upgraded from Patrone 88 to S Patrone, and were sold to the US in the late 1990s, Much the worst for wear. Equador also sold a lot of M71/84s (in very Poor Condition) about the same time...Gibbs refurbished some as Single shots for "The Last Samurai" Film

DocAV
 

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Doc-Another spot on, detail filled answer to a little noticed or remarked on milsurp genealogy trail. Connecting the dots with tribal knowledge of the subject plus little known facts to give the big picture. Filmology reference intended. The "Last Samurai" indeed! Who knew?:thumbsup:
 

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In 1936 Ecuador purchased 30,000 VZ24 rifles with VZ23 long bayonets. They were taken from Czechoslovak Army reserve and later replaced by ZB. They did not have an Ecuadoran crest and have never been sold as surplus.
...but quite a few were captured by our troops in the 1941 war against them, many still packed in their original crates (Specially when Port Bolivar was captured by Peruvian parachutists, loaded on top of some rail cars). According to my grandad that fought there, he remembers seeing a lot of mule trains carrying captured '88s and Vz-24s going back to Peru during their troops advance inside Ecuadorian territory. Here's mine:

View attachment 1984233

Got it from a retired Air Force officer, who bought it from the widow of an old veteran of that war who rented him a room close to the airport where he was stationed, close to the border. Missing bayonet and sling, and has the tip of the barrel bulged by shooting a round without cleaning first the heavily greased bore :angry:, but nothing a counterboring job can't solve.

As stated, no Ecuadorian crest. We didn't bought these in 8mm, so all those observed down here are from the same source, and are inside a certain S/N batch; sadly most have been sporterized, but at least a friend of mine still has one in pretty much original condition, and there are a few around still pretty much unmolested.
 

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In the 1930s, they bought the aforementioned Vz24s from ZB ( Recycled Army Rifles) and also "S" Patrone from "Z" (Povaska Bystrica) of ZB,( Formerly "Circle-M" of Bratislava

DocAV
The "Z" in ZB is for Zbrojovka. ZB is short for Zbrojovka Brno, the company. That includes the first location in Brno and the second, later, location in Povaska Bystrica.

ZB was known for borrowing unused (not recycled) rifles from Czechoslovak Army reserve to offer fast shipment to its customers. ZB would then make new rifles to replace the borrowed ones. That gave them an edge over FN which had no large stock of completed rifles. FN competed with lower prices (but longer delivery time) and a willingness to change features of the rifle design to suit the customer.

Of course when ZB sold unused CS Army rifles to a customer, the rifles had no customer crest.
 

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Just one correction. All AA-55 7,9x57 projectiles are sS (198 grain). Have pulled many thousands of them, (bad priming.) The CZ supplied ammo (1930s dates) was all S ball (154 grain), again, have pulled thousands down. JH
 

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@ DocAV, thanks for your correction!

I'm not absolutely sure that the Gew.88 i've shown in post #2 is a Ecuadorian one (it's not my own). It was made for export, since the German army did not get any Steyr made M88 in 1894.
Acc. to Paul Scarlata's book, Ecuador bought their Gew. 88 end of the 90's. This was too early to get large no. of German used Gew.88 - the large German army contracts for Gew. 98 started 1904 (acc. to Wolfgang Seel)
--> the rifle i've shown has a good chance to be Ecuadorian. Could be Chinese or Peruvian as well. At least, it is identical to the ones used by Ecuador (before re-barreling).

Chris
 

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My GEW88 came from Old West Scrounger in a Navy Arms-marked box. It does not have the 'S' mod and has a Czech barrel. Supposedly it came from that batch of guns. The front band has a German unit mark on it (can't remember which one specifically). Shoots very well BTW.
 

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.....the rifle I've shown has a good chance to be Ecuadorian. Could be Chinese or Peruvian as well. At least, it is identical to the ones used by Ecuador (before re-barreling).

Chris
Although we bought a small batch of assorted '88 rifles (I've observed long rifles, short rifles and carbines) probably before the purchase of the '91s in 1900, I've never heard that those survived long enough in military storage to be exported as surplus in the '60s along with the '91s, '09s, '32s & '35s.
Apparently once the 7.65 Mauser cartridge was adopted with the '91s, the '88s were delivered to State-sponsored civilian rifle shooting clubs or sold as surplus.
I've found a few in not-so-bad condition considering the age and how these old rifles are usually treated in the "tropics". Among these, there are apparently quite a few that were also captured in 1941 (Known here as "Steyr rifles").
 
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