Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,553 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The CDC is really stretching here....What a Crock of sh*t!!!.....They will use anything to get you to stop hunting and scare people.

-----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.aonmag.com/article.php?id=1623&cid=158

CDC Study Finds Slightly Higher Levels of Lead In People Who Eat Wild Game
Experts say increased levels small enough to be of little concern.
By Nick Carter
Posted Monday December 22 2008, 3:57 PM

A recent CDC report found that eating yummy-looking deer like these after killing them with lead ammo could lead to slightly increased levels of lead in the blood.

If you’re reading this, you are probably someone who kills and eats animals. And, as someone who eats wild game, how many times have you bitten gingerly into a dove or piece of rabbit, encountered lead shot with your teeth and spit it out on the plate?

If you are like most people who eat wild game, that is a relatively frequent occurrence. So it should come as no surprise that a recent Centers for Disease Control (CDC) study found that eating wild game harvested with lead ammunition produces slightly higher levels of lead in the blood stream. However, those increased levels don’t appear to be high enough to be of concern to the average adult.

Following the recent uproar over lead found in venison donated to North Dakota food banks, the CDC tested lead levels in blood samples taken from 736 North Dakotans.

In a nutshell, the study found that study participants who ate lots of wild game had higher lead levels than those who didn’t, and the more recently wild game was eaten, the higher the lead levels. The study also found that those who eat venison as well as game birds had the highest lead levels in the sample group.

The average lead level of participants in the study, 1.17 micrograms per deciliter, was lower than the national average of 1.60 micrograms per deciliter, and none of the participants had lead levels higher than the 10 micrograms per deciliter threshold at which the CDC recommends case management. The increase in lead levels associated with the consumption of wild game in this study was just 0.3 micrograms per deciliter. However, according to the report, another study showed an increased risk of heart problems for adults with lead levels higher than 2 micrograms per deciliter.

“Lead is a neurotoxin. Any amount is detrimental to people, but it’s much more dangerous for children than adults. We’re much more concerned with children because they have a much lower tolerance for lead than adults,” said Forrest Staley, the director of a childhood lead poisoning prevention program.

Lead exposure has been linked to physical and cognitive developmental problems in young children, and high levels of lead exposure can cause problems for pregnant women.

The North Dakota Department of Health, which prompted the study, has issued safety guidelines that suggest children under 6 years old and pregnant women not eat venison harvested with lead ammunition. Alabama’s Health Department has not issued any recommendations.

“A lead level of 1.17, to me, is almost nonexistent,” said Dr. Erica Liebelt, with the Alabama Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program. “And 0.3 could be a small enough figure to fit within the variance of the study. That is like nothing. It is not a significant amount of lead.”

Forrest said to get your blood or your child’s blood tested if you are worried, and he added that you could hunt with non-lead ammunition.

Forrest said bullet fragments in the meat itself would be the main potential source of lead exposure from eating wild game. There would not be time for lead to get into the system of a cleanly killed deer, although lead could be distributed throughout the system of a previously wounded deer.

To limit lead exposure from wild game, hunters can use ammunition less prone to fragment and use a processor trusted to carefully inspect meat for lead fragments. If you process your own meat, trim a generous distance from the wound channel and discard any meat that is bruised, discolored or contains dirt, hair or bone fragments.

So, regardless of what shooting-sports organizations are spouting, eating wild game does appear to be associated with slightly increased levels of lead. However, contrary to what you hear from anti-hunting groups, you should probably be more concerned with lead in the paint on your walls.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,224 Posts
Most of the wild game I shoot dies of lead pizoning!
We are all going to die if we live long enough and don't get killed.

Life is short- eat dessert first.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,469 Posts
Soft points?

Czech LPS is thankfully Steel Core and legal in Alaska. ;)

Thankfully, it seldom breaks up, 'cept when it hits bone, and I aint chewing that.

Czeck also keyholes very well by the time its crossed through a Caribou.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,336 Posts
One thing to note, since the general public has not been exposed to lead, there has not been any advances in physics, we have been unable to travel to the moon and back, and there is a greater number of autistic children. I think lead is an important trace element, and with out it we will die.
Best wihses
gus
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
490 Posts
What they are saying is pretty harmless, and already known to be true. Ingesting lead DOES increase the amount of it in your system, but as they say, it doesn't normally rise to a dangerous level, and if you are worried, you can get tested, and/or switch to lead-free ammunition. All that is perfectly reasonable.

Civil War soldiers lived and were X-rayed in the early 20th century with bare lead projectiles embedded in their bodies, which must surely have raised their lead levels more. It is nearly impossible to get lead poisoning from a wound, but it seems the danger escalates drastically if lead is in contact with the lubricating sinovial fluid of the joints, in addition to the other demerits of the situation.

The biggest source of danger is lead which has had a chance to combine with other substances, particularly oxygen, and form compounds which you then ingest. That includes those used in lead paints, but it would have to be very old paintwwork to include any of those nowadays. About dust on short target ranges where arriving bullets can impact on old, oxidised ones, the lead poisoning theorists are not fooling.

It is a complex subject, and deciding in advance that you won't hear what you don't like the sound of, is rash in the extreme.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,761 Posts
The original report was by one lefty researcher. It's very old news, Just like Kalifornia Condors are endangered by ingesting leadd fom the remains of animals killed by hunters.
1. the bird has been barely hanging on for years and Not because of hunters.
2. If you shoot a deer, one would assume you are going to pack out the carcass to eat the damm thing.
3. If the bullet goes all the way through, why would a bird want to eat a bullet?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
413 Posts
This claim is bogus and has been de-bunked!!

Gotta add my 2 cents to this thread.

This "study" was performed by a DERMATOLOGIST who serves on the board of directors of the Peregrine Fund, an organisation dedicated to eliminating the use of lead in hunting.

This study has no scientific or practical value, except to promote an anti-hunting agenda.

http://www.nssf.org/news/PR_idx.cfm?AoI=generic&PRloc=share/PR/&PR=110708.cfm

I know this info has been posted earler, but it bears repeating.

tom
 

·
Platinum Bullet Member
Joined
·
696 Posts
They are nor saying the bald eagles are dying from lead poisining.

Rad
We have had 4 mature and any number of juvenile Eagles feasting on our gut piles nearly year round for a decade or more. Every year they have more juveniles that at maturity, leave to find their own hunting grounds and mates. They eat extremely well and seem to prefer pork to venison. By the way, the buzzards and coyotes do not come near until the Eagles have their fill and have left.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
294 Posts
Common sense has left the CDC building!

I was at first a little excited about the finding but after thinking back when you butcher your deer do you eat the bullet damaged portions that hemoraged from the bullet impact? you would have to be a pretty determined individual to eat that bloody bone fragmented meat! a little thinking goes a long ways, As a kid I remember eating some dry old mallard Dad busted with a 12ga and spitting out pellets at the dinner table
we used to compete who had the most pellets by ther plate! :eek:
 

·
Gold Bullet Member
Joined
·
767 Posts
When I was a youngster my dad used a shotgun for all of his hunting and I did the same till the late 60s when I bought my first 22 with a scope. Head shots so then I could no longer eat the brains of the squirrels.

Rad
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top