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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I JUST brought this M1 Carbine home. Though I would post because of some early production variations are on this rifle but I believe there are some later production items as well as a few things that I don’t know much about.

Serial number 656XXX but with the numbers 1135 below the serial number that look very professionally done. Any ideas on that?

Inland Manufacture with a 9-43 barrel date.

High wood stock. Crossed cannon cartouche with RMC on the stock (Rockola?)

Looks like the stock was varnished a very long time ago.

Early band. Noticed something strange though. (I’m not a huge Carbine collector so maybe its just me.) The front of the top handguard has a metal band that is on the front groove that fits into the barrel band. From what I recall I have never seen a metal band on any top wood at the front of the handguard?

Flat bolt. Rockola recoil plate.
On the recoil plate and the bottom of the trigger guard are stamped: “WB-S-SCH” with the “1” below it. Any ideas?
Front sling swivel stamped “QU”.
Rear sight stamped I.R. CO. and below that 7160060
Push button safety.

Curious what the yellow lettering was for? Rack # etc?

Am I correct to say this is an early variation but with some later upgrades. If so, I am surprised the front band wasn’t updated. Or is that a common thing as well?
















 

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It has a number of later parts, like the stamped adjustable rear sight and the fabricated, brazed trigger group.
The metal band on the handguard looks to be something added later by an owner.

The yellow letters could be who knows what, including something that was added by a foreign government if it was given to one after the war.
Usually rack numbers were added to the right side of the butt stock lower toward the butt plate and they usually weren't that many digits, just 3 or 4.
Rack numbers located there on the left side would be quickly worn off.

I've seen the numbers added to the rear of the receiver, but I can't remember what the details were, it's been so long ago since I read it.
No idea on the lettering on the recoil plate and bottom of the trigger group.

For a Carbine with the brazed trigger group, I'm surprised it has the bush button safety. Again, this could have been installed by a foreign user or an American owner who wanted the button type safety.

In all, it looks like a standard Carbine that's seen the usual installation of a mix of newer parts, but by WHO is a question. As noted, a lot of Carbines were given to foreign governments and a lot were sold in the US by the DCM.
After they passed into civilian ownership just about anything you can think of was done by owners.
 

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Looking through my carbine reference book, it looks to me like your carbine went through some light rebuild, but apparently late in the war, not a full post-war arsenal rebuild. It would have had several parts replaced as the early types were declared obsolete had it been refurbished after the war.

The stock is Rock-Ola (Type I or Type II, depending on the oiler cutout), which also explains the recoil plate as the plate and stock were usually together. The handguard may also be Rockola, it would be marked RMC on the underside edge.

The safety and magazine catch appear to be correct originals, the front barrel band is the correct type, but the sling swivel is a Quality Hardware piece.

The rear sight is a replacement, but likely late wartime as the Type III sight was used in production at Inland and Winchester very late in production. My 1943 Winchester has the same sight, but without the number below I.R.Co, which I believe is a post-war arsenal refurb change (my carbine most likely went through post-war refurb, as it is an early production Winchester, but has had many parts updated to the later types).

As far as the stampings on the recoil plate, trigger guard and rear of the receiver, I don't see anything about them so far. Maybe a special unit or reserve arsenal of some kind, might explain how it missed an arsenal refurbishment?
 

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I believe your carbine may have spent time in post war Germany.
A better picture, close up of the markings on the heel of the receiver would help; but WB is for Wuertemburg, and the 'S. Sch.' may be for the Police School for Schwabia.
The 1135 is likely a rack or inventory number, and the date in paint on the side may be a rack/ re-furb/inspection/ or inventory date related to the foreign service.

Any import marking?
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks so far to everyone with the help.

As I may have mentioned, I'm not a big carbine collector, just have one as a place holder in my collection. Funny thing is I went and pulled down my other M1 carbine. This one is a near identical copy with all the different variations to the one i just got at auction. From the high wood stock (SG), to the type 4 trigger guard, push button safety,type 1 front band etc. Almost like they were side by side during their time together! Although my other one is in much better condition. Its and Underwood with Rockola barrel. To be honest, i didnt think i would win this one at auction as my price was not all that high.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
03man, I was typing when your response came in. I believe you may be right about Germany. My other one that I mentioned in the above post came from Germany as well. Direct from the older gentleman who I bought it from when he immigrated from there many decades ago.

Havent seen any import marks, but most likely there wont be any as these came into Canada and not the USA.
 

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Look at the bottom of the barrel very closely for a small import marking. Also on import marks, INTRAC KNOX, TN imported 7500 or so. Look behind the front sight on the bottom of the barrel. Those are a little more special since the history has a little more documentation.
 

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The ”metal band” on the front of the hand guard was made by one of the guns previous owners to keep the wood from rattling. Fairly common “fix” if you can call it that, not done by the military or an arsenal.
 

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I agree,
The effort/skill/time to make the metal band is not typical "home work".
I also suspect that the band was added by the German users; for sure I would not exclude the possibility.
The Germans were always doing something to their carbines so why not done by them?
 
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One of my Inlands is a Bravarian Rural Police marked and all matching Carbines.....all of the major parts received the last few of the serial number and the unit blued. I had one years ago that had the rear sight dovetail filled and a blade added just forward of the markings over the chamber, it too had been blued.
 

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I JUST brought this M1 Carbine home. Though I would post because of some early production variations are on this rifle but I believe there are some later production items as well as a few things that I don’t know much about.

Serial number 656XXX but with the numbers 1135 below the serial number that look very professionally done. Any ideas on that?

Inland Manufacture with a 9-43 barrel date.

High wood stock. Crossed cannon cartouche with RMC on the stock (Rockola?)

Looks like the stock was varnished a very long time ago.

Early band. Noticed something strange though. (I’m not a huge Carbine collector so maybe its just me.) The front of the top handguard has a metal band that is on the front groove that fits into the barrel band. From what I recall I have never seen a metal band on any top wood at the front of the handguard?

Flat bolt. Rockola recoil plate.
On the recoil plate and the bottom of the trigger guard are stamped: “WB-S-SCH” with the “1” below it. Any ideas?
Front sling swivel stamped “QU”.
Rear sight stamped I.R. CO. and below that 7160060
Push button safety.

Curious what the yellow lettering was for? Rack # etc?

Am I correct to say this is an early variation but with some later upgrades. If so, I am surprised the front band wasn’t updated. Or is that a common thing as well?
















alamar ---- I enjoyed reading about and looking at the photos of your early production M1 Carbine. I have a M1 similar to yours, it's a Std. Products make with many of the same features of yours. The flat bolt, push button safety, a 7-43 Underwood stamp on the barrel with a flaming bomb, cross cannon stamp on the right side of the stock and a flip type rear site. The recoil plate on the stock behind the rear site is stamped "Standard Products". The hand guard over the barrel has only two holes at its rear end. There is no bayonet attaching bar under the barrel. The canvas sling appears to be original to the gun with some fraying of the strap at the sling swivel. The brass snap on the sling near the front swivel has a very small arrow just below the stud hole. I've had this M1 since 1967 and used to shoot it but no more. My shooter is an Inland Motors Div. with a replacement stock and sling.
 
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