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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This sledge-gun having a "Sundsvalls Gevärsfaktori" marked barrel. This factory active 1622 to around 1676 and maybe little later. Probably in most parts moved to Söderhamns faktori when closed down.
Sundsvall faktori was allowed to produce even for civilian market 1645. So, the gun may have been produced in Söderhamn first part of 1700s but using an older Sundsvalls barrel.








Regards,
ARILAR

sbhva
Moderator



USA
1477 Posts
Posted - 02/27/2007 : 10:12:46 AM
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WOW!!!!!!!

ARILAR, you are a wonderful addition to our forum. Thank you for sharing all this great information.



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Steve



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Edited by - sbhva on 02/27/2007 10:13:24 AM


JK
Gunboards Super Premium Member



USA
404 Posts
Posted - 02/27/2007 : 8:18:55 PM
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Arilar
I must agree with Steve, that certainly is a rare treasure you have. Thank you, John


Ordtech
Gunboards Premium Member



USA
150 Posts
Posted - 02/27/2007 : 9:14:36 PM
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A beautifully simple lock work.


arilar
Gunboards Premium Member



Sweden
244 Posts
Posted - 03/03/2007 : 03:48:14 AM
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Yes old, simple and beautiful!!
Smoothbore in cal..62. Total lenght 29½ inch and barrel 15 inch.
Here pics on some details:













Regards,
ARILAR



LeeSpeed
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member



USA
1024 Posts
Posted - 03/09/2007 : 11:45:50 AM
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How in the heck did I miss this post??

Arilar, good grief where do you get this stuff?

Very cool. I think I'd happily trade my cobbled-on 38 "carbine" for this carbine!!

Do you suppose it was a cutdown musket?

Why do you call it a "sledge gun"? Shortened to fit on the sleigh? Where was it used, any ideas? Were carbines of this type used commonly for commerical purposes or mostly cavalry use?

One more thing...

SIMPLE yes, but I can tell you from my knifemaking experience that that mainspring took one whale of a lot of skill to forge and heat treat, proven by the fact that it is still there! Amazing, really.

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For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that whosoever believes in him should not perish but have everlasting life. Jn 3:16 Verbum Domini Manet in Aeternum.


arilar
Gunboards Premium Member



Sweden
244 Posts
Posted - 03/09/2007 : 2:31:25 PM
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quote:
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Originally posted by LeeSpeed

How in the heck did I miss this post??

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LeSpeed...you must focus...just focus.
Maybe this actually gun is not "common" in Sweden but a lot of nice, rare or interesting weapons are to be found. For the moment interest in collecting weapons seems to be going back. Hard to find youngsters (under 40) to get interested in the field. The old vets are leaving the collecting in one way or another. This "sledge-gun" hasnt more value in Sweden than a CG63 has in U.S.Go figure!!
Sledge-gun...yes this rifle is produced in northern part of Sweden. Yes, shortened to fit in a sledge or to easy be concealed when used during "illegal" hunting. Not a barrel from a military musket (should have been caliber 20 mm if so).
This has not been any military issued gun. Maybe, maybe bought privately for an officer to be used around 1700 ( the king forced the officers in late 1600s to get snaplockmusket by their on expense to use in duty). This is a very interesting and mysterious gun IMO.
Regards,
ARILAR


Ordtech
Gunboards Premium Member



USA
150 Posts
Posted - 03/09/2007 : 9:44:09 PM
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quote:
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Originally posted by LeeSpeed

SIMPLE yes, but I can tell you from my knifemaking experience that that mainspring took one whale of a lot of skill to forge and heat treat, proven by the fact that it is still there! Amazing, really.

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Oh, I admire the skill of the maker! I was referring to the design itself. No added extra improved stirrup holdback retaining dohickeys and thingybobs. Just pure functional machine.
If you can do that Leespeed, you can do a whale of a lot more than I.
Dennis


LeeSpeed
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member



USA
1024 Posts
Posted - 03/10/2007 : 12:47:53 AM
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Ordtech: Don't worry, I knew you weren't cracking on the gun.

It IS simple, and that part of what makes it so impressive. The guy that crafted it knew a lot about metallurgy for sure. Very neat gun!!

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For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that whosoever believes in him should not perish but have everlasting life. Jn 3:16 Verbum Domini Manet in Aeternum.


daniel phillips
Gunboards Super Premium Member



USA
297 Posts
Posted - 03/14/2007 : 8:56:08 PM
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arilar,cant tell what kind of wood was used? and the condition of the bore? could you give us a bore shot? and a shot where the written infomation is? and are there any other marks thats not on the barrel? im not as informed concerning this type of gun ,how are you keeping it from rusting? but im willing to learn. daniel phillips


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dan phillips


akb
Gunboards Super Premium Member



279 Posts
Posted - 03/15/2007 : 12:22:23 AM
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Awesome!


Rev. Two Bands
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member



1022 Posts
Posted - 03/15/2007 : 5:59:38 PM
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Very neat, indeed. Curiously enough this kind of Baltic lock was built by local gunsmiths well into the late 1800s; I even saw some that were either converted to or outright built as caplocks (and certainly used into the 1900s !).


arilar
Gunboards Premium Member



Sweden
244 Posts
Posted - 03/16/2007 : 4:04:33 PM
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Once a flintlock and now on its way to a cap-lock!!





Regards,
ARILAR
PS. Hedding for the mountains for cross-country skiing with family for a week. Getting back with more pics on the snaplock later. DS.


Ordtech
Gunboards Premium Member



USA
150 Posts
Posted - 03/17/2007 : 02:26:49 AM
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Another interesting and economical piece (for the 1820s).Is that a cheap military conversion, period gunsmith work, or a homegrown solution to what was in hand?
D


Rev. Two Bands
Gunboards.Com Gold Star Member



1022 Posts
Posted - 03/17/2007 : 5:47:06 PM
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Especially Northern Sweden used to be very poor country, due to marginal agricultural conditions. Hunting "on the cheap" therefore was very important, and local gunsmiths would utilize whatever was at hand/available, improvising on the go. Hence the survival of the ancient snaplock, and the conversion of ex-military flintlocks into makeshift caplocks (as on photo), or (whenever available) the conversion of ex-military actions or entire guns into hunting weapons. The Rolling Block may have been the last of these guns to be converted in fairly large numbers. Mixed "home-grown" guns with at least in part military hardware were very common. Interestingly enough the Depression of the 1930s caused many of the old muzzle-loaders to be brought back into use, since black powder and lead were available and cheaper than fixed ammo. Noteworthy is that many of these guns were either smoothbores of large calibre, or rifles of astonishingly small calibre (about .40" to .36"), the latter ones used for hunting not only fowl "on tree-top" but even moose (from very close range. The idea was to let the moose come up to you, in hiding).


Ordtech
Gunboards Premium Member



USA
150 Posts
Posted - 03/17/2007 : 8:16:17 PM
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Thanks Rev. Two Bands.
D
 
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