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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
With some advanced Japanese rifle collectors often posting threads on this Board, we are privileged to view some great images and participate in interesting discussions about Japanese rifles. As a Japanese pistol collector (and "gatherer" of some other Japanese militaria items including a few rifles), I have learned much about Japanese rifles and other items in many outstanding informational posts. Threads about Japanese pistols do not occur very often which is unfortunate, as I would like to see more pistol collector interactions on this Board. So, I thought I would post an image of a couple of Type 14s in early (1926.Nov) and late (1945.Aug) production configurations to spur some interest. These "Taisho" and "Last Ditch" variation pistols are rarely individually encountered and certainly extremely rare when viewed together.
DSCN1069 - Copy.JPG
 

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Simply wonderful! Thanks for posting!
 

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Nice bookends. I particularly like last ditch Japanese stuff, and I would love to have a really late T-14 like that.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
How did the date code work on that early pistol? It's a different format than the later ones.
Emperor Taisho died in late December 1926 in the 15th year of his reign or 15.12. His son and successor, Hirohito (Showa Era), then began his first year reign that month or 1.12. A week later in January 1927 with the year change, his reign date was 2.1. Only a few Type 14s were made with the Taisho date code (high reported 15.12 is #104). The low reported Showa-dated Type 14 is 2.1 #112. There are 17 Taisho-marked examples reported by collectors.
 

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Sweet!!!
 

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I did not know of the 1XX early Type-14 pistols. I have learned something. Thank you.
 

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Nice collection! It's quite interesting to see the difference between the early variations of the Type 14, and how they were produced later in the war with resources growing dim.

I also have a Kokubunji Type 14, stamped 昭15.9 (1940 Sept.). I recently installed a reproduction lanyard for the aesthetics and looks. Everything is matching, but unfortunately the magazine isn't. (If someone has a mag stamped 432 for Kokubunji, that would be very much appreciated!)
3782724


Out of curiosity, have you fired your Nambus and noticed any problems or the extractor bending up? Gave mine a go recently and noticed I was experiencing some problems cycling, along with the extractor bending up. I've narrowed it down to the possibility that the soft metal of the extractor is starting to be worn, possibly some of the springs, and the ammo being shot. (83gr PCI ammo, switching to 100gr when I start reloading.)

Had an unfortunate stovepipe that somewhat sealed the deal of me continuing to shoot with the current extractor. I'm going to look into making some reproduction extractors later this month.
3782725
 

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Nice to see the devolution between pistols, just like rifles.

The two I have are only separated by 3 years...16.2 and 19.2. My earlier one is matching except for magazine and cocking knob (need 441). My later 19.2 is all matching with both magazines. Both have canvas holsters, sadly, no original straps or lanyards.

I shoot my earlier pistol but not my matching one...I can’t justify it since I have a “not so special” one. I was able to figure out how to reload on a progressive press and can crank out rounds pretty quick. So far, I’ve shot about 250 rounds in my back yard without issues (knock on wood) but I have to chase down my brass since my supply is limited.





- I’ve never met a gun I didn’t like.
 

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Rampage your pistols not only span the early to late production but are also excellent examples and are to be envied. My second Japanese firearm was a T14 and I collected 4 of them before I branched out to rifles and bayonets. My T14s date from 12/29 to 5/45.
 

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With some advanced Japanese rifle collectors often posting threads on this Board, we are privileged to view some great images and participate in interesting discussions about Japanese rifles. As a Japanese pistol collector (and "gatherer" of some other Japanese militaria items including a few rifles), I have learned much about Japanese rifles and other items in many outstanding informational posts. Threads about Japanese pistols do not occur very often which is unfortunate, as I would like to see more pistol collector interactions on this Board. So, I thought I would post an image of a couple of Type 14s in early (1926.Nov) and late (1945.Aug) production configurations to spur some interest. These "Taisho" and "Last Ditch" variation pistols are rarely individually encountered and certainly extremely rare when viewed together.
View attachment 3782574
Rampage, can you give us a breakdown of the parts specs on your 20.8 pistol? Those August production pistols are extremely interesting with the multi-manufacturer parts and mixed numbers and other ersatz type assembly. Those, to me, are some of the most intriguing Type 14's and getting to see what parts were used and such would be awesome.

I only have one T-14 (you have it recorded from me years ago), its a 20.5 dated one and also has some late war features. The firing pin was salvaged from another pistol and had the original number on the side of the tail partly ground off and the matching number stamped on the shaft. The stamp matches some of the other parts stamping. The cocking knob number was originally stamped with 2 of the numbers sideways, then re-stamped the correct way with different stamps. The left grip screw is Kokobunji, due to the shape, and the frame screw holes are not uniformly threaded. The magazine safety lever end is not cut square, but curved, so when the trigger is pulled with the mag out it does not lock the trigger. Everything matches, including the magazine, but there is much oddities on these late pistols. Just like German weapons of the very late war months.
3783607
 
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Discussion Starter #18
Attached is a parts listing breakdown for #72931. Just about any part available was used in Last Ditch production (late 20.6 through 20.8 or around 1.1K pistols). Parts could be blued or in-the-white (unfinished), numbered or unnumbered, of all styles previously produced (grips 17, 24, 25, or slab; cocking knobs grooved or solid; etc.), and inspection marks could be from various factories (Toriimatsu, Kokubunji, Tokyo, and Kokura observed). This pistol also has an interesting left grip screw "washer" - a cut-down 10 sen coin dated 1944 (see image).
Copy of DSCN2413.JPG
 

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Attached is a parts listing breakdown for #72931. Just about any part available was used in Last Ditch production (late 20.6 through 20.8 or around 1.1K pistols). Parts could be blued or in-the-white (unfinished), numbered or unnumbered, of all styles previously produced (grips 17, 24, 25, or slab; cocking knobs grooved or solid; etc.), and inspection marks could be from various factories (Toriimatsu, Kokubunji, Tokyo, and Kokura observed). This pistol also has an interesting left grip screw "washer" - a cut-down 10 sen coin dated 1944 (see image).
View attachment 3783625
Now that is a unique pistol. Thanks for posting the information on it. What is your opinion of when this pistol would have been assembled? Do you think pre- or post-surrender? The coin washer does not seem like something that would be done for a potentially issued pistol, but I don't know. There was post-surrender assembly, directed by the American soldiers, of Walther P-38's, PP/PPK's and Sauer 38H pistols in Germany and all were mixed number parts for the most part. Would that same thing be the case in Japan?
 

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I picked up a Type 14 a couple years ago through Cabella's. It's a November 1943 production (18.11), from the Nagoya Arsenal, Toriimatsu Branch, Second Series, serial no. 1XXX, with matching magazine..

I recently purchased a reproduction holster from World War Supply, so it has a proper "home" to live in.

It's fun to shoot, and it really messes some folks up when they see it, especially if I've also brought my Luger with me to the range.
 
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