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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know what the meaning of the stamp "E.E.U.U. VENEZUELA" seen on the crest of my Venezuelan FN M30 carbine? The stamp occurs on the lowest (farthest aft) ribbon below the shield. Based on the proof marks and inspection stamps on this carbine, I believe it was one of the post-WWII carbines made by FN for Venezuela. If it helps, I have a pre-WWII Venezuelan FN M30 short rifle with a slightly different stamp in the same location. It says "E.E.U.U. DE VENEZUELA". I assume the stamp has something to do with Estados Unidos De Venezuela, the country's official name from 1864 to 1953.

Also, I am assuming this receiver was originally manufactured in the white and has been reblued some time later. Can anyone confirm whether post-WWII carbines were manufactured with receivers in the white like pre-WWII Venezuelan FN30 rifles and carbines?

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Both of my crests are different from yours. The Short Rifle says E. E. U. L. DE VENEZUELA but the Carbine is hard to read and looks like E. E. ?. ?. DE VENEZUELA.

It could be that both of mine say E. E. U. U. DE VENEZUELA and the die is just worn on my Short Rifle.

Wait! I just found this crest photo on the net and it clearly says E. E. U. L. DE VENEZUELA:


FN1930 Short Rifle
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FN1930 Carbine
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
CORRECTION: I edited the opening thread: the carbine is pre-1948-49 not post-War.

My pre-War Venezuelan FN 30 short rifle (top photo) has the "DE" in it (sorry, fuzzy pic) as do a pair of consecutively serialized Venezuelan FN 30 target rifles, also manufactured pre-War (Bottom photo).


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Some crests have E. E. U. L. and others have E. E. U. U. The reason for the difference is still unknown.
 

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In Spanish initialism used in the context of plurals is done by repeating the first letter twice. E.E.U.U. refers to Estados Unidos de Venezuela, the official name of the country from 1864 to 1953.
There is no such thing as E.E.U.L. - that L is simply a lightly stamped, or worn U.
 

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In Spanish initialism used in the context of plurals is done by repeating the first letter twice. E.E.U.U. refers to Estados Unidos de Venezuela, the official name of the country from 1864 to 1953.
There is no such thing as E.E.U.L. - that L is simply a lightly stamped, or worn U.
Thank you. It's nice to read a post from someone who can clearly answer an unanswerable question. Being only an English and German speaker, I would never have guessed that in Spanish doubled initials indicated plural.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Just to be clear, if the abbreviation was indicating a singular condition, there would be only one letter with a period but if the abbreviation refers to a plural condition, then the letters are doubled. Is that correct?
 

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Just to be clear, if the abbreviation was indicating a singular condition, there would be only one letter with a period but if the abbreviation refers to a plural condition, then the letters are doubled. Is that correct?
That is correct. An example of that would be Distrito Federal, abbreviated as D.F. One federal district, one letter per.
If the reference was to Distritos Federales, it’d be D.D.F.F. (though usually there only one, like the American D.C.)
Another example any of us collector types may encounter would be F.F.A.A. which refers to Fuerzas Armadas, or armed forces. And, yes, plural in Spanish is typically noted with an “s” at the end of the word.
 

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That is correct. An example of that would be Distrito Federal, abbreviated as D.F. One federal district, one letter per.
If the reference was to Distritos Federales, it’d be D.D.F.F. (though usually there only one, like the American D.C.)
Another example any of us collector types may encounter would be F.F.A.A. which refers to Fuerzas Armadas, or armed forces. And, yes, plural in Spanish is typically noted with an “s” at the end of the word.
I guess that might be why Fuerzas Armadas is spelled out on the left hand side of the post war carbine receivers.
Dan
 

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In Spanish initialism used in the context of plurals is done by repeating the first letter twice. E.E.U.U. refers to Estados Unidos de Venezuela, the official name of the country from 1864 to 1953.
There is no such thing as E.E.U.L. - that L is simply a lightly stamped, or worn U.
Yes, United States of Venezuela
The USA is abbreviated in Spanish language usually with E.E.U.U. (e.g. 'hecho en EEUU' - made in the USA)...

Chris
 

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There were three of these at one auction last weekend. They all fetched money, though not as much as the Persian long rifles.
 
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