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Discussion Starter #1
Right now I'm only shooting what I reload for, so I decided it was well past time to work with this carbine a bit.
I have owned it for about 10 years but really haven't done much with it, I have about 60 original rounds that actually shoot but I think I'll save those for the next world war.

This load shows promise 140 grn speer bullet using a mix of bertram brass and reformed 303, biggest problem is maintaining that sight picture, man they are gettin tough to see the older I get. Lowest sight setting is 400 meters, my point of aim was the bottom target at 50 yards, whatever load I tried all print right there in the head.

I guess a kneecap instead of belt buckle hold for the Dutch Army at close range.
This carbine has a stock cartouche dated 1939 so she might have made it into action, it's in pretty good shape with an excellent bore, built on a 1906 Hembrug reciever with bolt renumbered to match.
Not too many folks shooting 6.5x53r these days, hard to even find load data, but its worth the effort.
 

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It looks like a #3 carbine with the extended handguard. Starting in 1938 they began modifing M95 rifles into M95 carbines of various configurations according to the branch of the army requesting them. Does your carbine have the wood cover on the left hand side of the magazine? If so it's the New Model 3 (which it should be at this late date.) The stock date of 1939 indicates it was finished and issued before the German Occupation. Yours is probably a bring back or early pre1968 import from the Netherlands and not one of the rusty post 1980 imports from Indonesia. I see these on the GB quite often and I would think someone would be making new boxer primed brass but it doesn't seem to be the case. What little I see offered is made from .303 British brass. Some were on this forum are a few posts with good loading data. Nice carbine and not easy to find in that nice of a condition, especially with a matching bolt.
Thanks for sharing
Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #3
No wood fairing on the magazine, it's a no5 for sure, welded sling swivel on the front band, the receiver is from a m95 long rifle and dated 1906.
Unfortunately the bolt head and ejector don't match as they were missing when I bought it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
No wood fairing on the magazine, it's a no5 for sure, welded sling swivel on the front band, the receiver is from a m95 long rifle and dated 1906.
Unfortunately the bolt head and ejector don't match as they were missing when I bought it.
Bertram makes boxer primed brass, expensive, but I have a good supply of it I bought in a package deal with a set of ch4 dies and 100 rounds of original ammo.
I converted 10 pieces of 303 brass, it works well too
 

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Correct it is a No 5 in Old Model 3 configuration and takes a standard M95 infantry long rifle bayonet. However the Dutch designated it as a Model B which signified that it was made in the configuration of a # 1, # 3 or a # 4 carbine depending upon which branch of the military it went to. All took the infantry bayonet because the modified front band was taken from an infantry rifle. Initial authorization to convert rifle to carbines was granted in November, 1938 & conversion was started April, 1939. A total of 35,500 rifles were converted to carbines and issued prior to May, 1940 when the Germans occupied the works at Hembrug. There were another 1,000 in the process of conversion that the Germans finish without regard to Dutch configuration requirements. They just used what parts were on hand to make a complete usable carbine. Enjoy shooting it, The 6.5mm Mannlicher rimmed is every bit as accurate as the 6.5mm rimless of the Swedish Mauser.
Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the information, still working on the best load, proper 160 grain bullets are no where to be found right now.
 

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I use cast 6.5 swede with 7.7 gr of unique in my Hembrug. A sweet shooting carbine. The enblock clips were a pricey item though.
 

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Just finished converting and prepping 100 brass for mine. Still researching load data. Isn’t 6.5 MS data pretty much interchangeable with 6.5x53.5?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Yes, I have some .256 Mannlicher load data, that came with my ch4 die set from the previous owner.
I also just picked up a copy of the 4th anniversary edition of handloaders digest from 1968, some 6.5x53r load data in it with some other military cartridges.
I got my copy off of Amazon, I would be happy to share what I have, if interested send me a pm.

I have not pursued cast bullet loads yet, but it may be in my future
 

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Thanks for the information, still working on the best load, proper 160 grain bullets are no where to be found right now.
Have you checked out the PPU 156gr long round-nose bullets?

I'm contemplating them for my old Swedish Mauser that has the long-jump lands and high twist rate. However, I just picked up 343 of the Hornady 160gr (catalog # 2640), and I have 380 old Interarmco 155gr 6.5x55 ammo that I won't shoot, but which wiill donate their bullets to the cause, so that would be a while down the road.

Prvi Partizan Bullet 6.5MM (.263) 156gr SPRN 100 per bag - Graf & Sons
 

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Just finished converting and prepping 100 brass for mine. Still researching load data. Isn’t 6.5 MS data pretty much interchangeable with 6.5x53.5?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
the 6,5x54 mannlicher schoenauer is the rimless version of the 6,5x53R mannlicher like 7x57/ 7x57R

loading data is the same
 
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