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I have a all matching Dutch Mannlicher rifle with the receiver date of 1906. The cartouche on the stock is 1911. I would like to know if the stock is a replacement or did the Dutch assembly rifles as needed from existing stock?
 

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Firstly, what is the Maker's Name on the Receiver: ?Steyr or Hembrug? Given a 1906 date, the maker is probably Steyr. So the rifle would have been supplied complete with stock in 1906/07...so a 1911 Cartouched stock is either a new replacement or a swap-out stock. Only after WW I did the Dutch "make up" rifles as required from older Parts and/or new Hembrug receivers ( Steyr stopped supplying with WW I).

Question for the Cognoscenti...Steyr supplied Rifles & Carbines from ?1897 to just before WW I; when did Hembrug start production? ( I Know they made actions during WW I; did they start before WW I? or during it?

Regards,
Doc AV
 

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According to De Vries & Martens in their "Nederlandse Vuurwapens - Landmacht en Luchtvaartafdeling - 1895 - 1940" (Dutch Firearms - Army & Army Airforce - 1895 - 1940) Steyr produced rifles for the Dutch Army from 1895 till 1898. After that, Steyr delivered Steyr-Mannlicher gun parts to The Netherlands that Hembrug used to assemble the rifles and carbines.
As of approx. 1904 Artillerie Inrichtingen at Hembrug started to produce their own M.95 rifles and carbines, which lasted until the end of WW1. After that no more rifles were produced.
As a matter of fact, the Dutch Army had so many rifles (470.000 at the end of WW1) that they transformed a number of rifles to carbines in 1938-1939 to cover a shortage for the Motorized Artillery and Anti-aircraft units. Probably about 35.500 of these "Karabijn No.5" were produced.
 

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According to De Vries & Martens in their "Nederlandse Vuurwapens - Landmacht en Luchtvaartafdeling - 1895 - 1940" (Dutch Firearms - Army & Army Airforce - 1895 - 1940) Steyr produced rifles for the Dutch Army from 1895 till 1898. After that, Steyr delivered Steyr-Mannlicher gun parts to The Netherlands that Hembrug used to assemble the rifles and carbines.
As of approx. 1904 Artillerie Inrichtingen at Hembrug started to produce their own M.95 rifles and carbines, which lasted until the end of WW1. After that no more rifles were produced.
As a matter of fact, the Dutch Army had so many rifles (470.000 at the end of WW1) that they transformed a number of rifles to carbines in 1938-1939 to cover a shortage for the Motorized Artillery and Anti-aircraft units. Probably about 35.500 of these "Karabijn No.5" were produced.
I am assuming that you mean the "end of WW1" to be an approximate date, correct? I have KNIL carbine with a receiver date of 1919 and a stock cartouche of 1920. Or does the book you reference only take into account the Netherlands Home Army requirements, and not the KNIL? If I understand correctly, the two armies were separate organizations in many respects.
 

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I have a Bicycle carbine, I believe it is a #4 OM, and is marked Hembrug 1906.
It is all matching except the stock, no markings on the stock, and has a 3 digit serial number.
These are really nice little carbines.
 

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@ bandook:
Yeah, that is an approximate date. I do think that some carbines were still being produced well into 1919. The book I mentioned is just about the firearms of the Home Army. I do not hold much information about the KNIL armament. In the same series of works of De Vries & Martens there is a part called "Nederlandse Vuurwapens - KNIL en de Militaire Luchtvaart 1897-1942" (Dutch Firearms - KNIL & Army Airforce - 1897 - 1942), which I - unfortunately don't have ...
 
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