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Nagants are only two of my collection (a Polish M44 and a Russian M38). I sighted in my M44, after having to make a huge front sight adjustment. I started running strings of five rounds each. After about fifty rounds, the POI started moving right. With each subsequent string it drifted until the POI had shifted 5-8 inches. Thoughts? This is just flat strange to me.
 

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:tisk: Run before the big bad kitty cat comes and corrects you!

Anyhow, have you let it cool before resuming fire to see if the POI shifts back to where it started? If it happens like this your barrel is expanding with heat and pressing against the stock.

If the POI is still off after cooling then your front sight is simply moving.


There is more than one solution for each problem.
 

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Nagants are only two of my collection...
What the others are kidding you about is that you're making a common "newbie" mistake in calling your rifles "Nagants." They're Mosins, or Mosin-Nagants, not "Nagants."

...(a Polish M44 and a Russian M38). I sighted in my M44, after having to make a huge front sight adjustment.
Not at all unusual, if you're shooting with the bayonet folded (as I do). M44s were originally sighted in with the bayonet extended. So you have to drift the front sight to compensate.

After about fifty rounds, the POI started moving right. With each subsequent string it drifted until the POI had shifted 5-8 inches. Thoughts? This is just flat strange to me.
Well, it's strange to me, too. Some here have suggested that the hot barrel is expanding in one direction. Maybe so. I can only say I've never encountered anything like that. Others have said it may be that your sight base is loose, and gradually moving out of position. To me that seems more likely. I'd say check the front sight, to see if it's solidly in its base, and if it holds its position from shot to shot. If it's too loose, it should be possible to wedge a small piece of thin sheet brass (from a hobby shop) in the slot, to tighten it up.
 

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Another simple suggestion is to make sure all your screws are tightened down. The M44 thumps pretty good, and I've noticed my 91/30's tend to need a little twist of the screwdriver now and then to keep everything consistent.
 

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Gentlemen, thanks. I'll look into the various recommendations and get back with you.
 

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What the others are kidding you about is that you're making a common "newbie" mistake in calling your rifles "Nagants." They're Mosins, or Mosin-Nagants, not "Nagants."



Not at all unusual, if you're shooting with the bayonet folded (as I do). M44s were originally sighted in with the bayonet extended. So you have to drift the front sight to compensate.



Well, it's strange to me, too. Some here have suggested that the hot barrel is expanding in one direction. Maybe so. I can only say I've never encountered anything like that. Others have said it may be that your sight base is loose, and gradually moving out of position. To me that seems more likely. I'd say check the front sight, to see if it's solidly in its base, and if it holds its position from shot to shot. If it's too loose, it should be possible to wedge a small piece of thin sheet brass (from a hobby shop) in the slot, to tighten it up.
Yep, a Nagant is a Russian REVOLVER!

I'm a thinking your screws holding the action might have loosened.
 

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I have 2 polish 44's,the one on the left I shoot and on the right I never have and probably never will.As they come the front sights are peened in place with a punch,I imagine after sighting at the factory.As you can hopefully see from the image I had to slightly open up the punch marks on the left rifle,in order to shift the front sight sideways with a flat brass punch,as it was shooting about a foot to the side for me at 50 meters.It would not budge without doing this.The front sight is still a fairly tight however,and does not move without a fairly hard smack with a brass punch.If your Polish 44 is loose here you could correct this I think with peening over the edges of the dovetail the front sight slides in.Its possible someone before you may have removed material from the sight to make it slide easier in the dovetail.....maybe not but that is the first thing I would look at (apart from tightening the receiver screws).
 

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First off the only dumb question is the one not asked! First try tightening screws and then see if its binding, i.e. not allowing the barrel to move freely when properly seated, grab the front of the stock and use your thumb to make sure there is a little free movement in the barrel. If the barrel binds it will have that type of impact on the grouping.-SDH
 

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First off the only dumb question is the one not asked! First try tightening screws and then see if its binding, i.e. not allowing the barrel to move freely when properly seated, grab the front of the stock and use your thumb to make sure there is a little free movement in the barrel. If the barrel binds it will have that type of impact on the grouping.-SDH
+1 It's definitely a good question.

Sorry about laughing earlier but FIVESHOTS comment was and is funny.

Especially as I recall a couple times I bought a bunch of different "turkey loads" and or rifle shells to see which ones worked/grouped the best, and before my shooting sessions were over, I was trying to convince myself that a few more rounds would be OK and how I remember the flinching and pulling that I as doing at the end.:) Bill.
 
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