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RG Guns had more than a few several years back that weren't refurbished. The problem was that they had the CAI billboard import mark on the receiver. Ugly ugly import mark.
Dan
 

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Are there any Czech marks? With that date "P" could stand for "Infantry" in Czech.
 
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It looks like there is a RCS stamp on the receiver which would indicate Czech use.
 
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Yes this is a czechoslovak postwar contract in Steyr, which was realised 1919-20, unit is marked to 44Inf.Regiment, which was located in north Czechia region .
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yeah, Elm is another thing I love on military rifles. Thank you for all the information guys, great to know more about it, I wasn’t sure what that “RCS” was. Much appreciated!
 

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Here it is on a 1919 M.12:

Green Motor vehicle Hood Bumper Automotive exterior
 

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A cool little piece. No "S" (spitzer) stamping so it should still be chambered for the older 8x50 round nose cartridge. It is very hard to find original 8x50 ammo and clips these days, but shouldn't the clips from the "S" marked 8x56 ammo still work with the older 8x50 cartridges? At one time I fire-formed some boxer cases (from Russian 7.62R? memory fades). Another problem was that this rifle is a true 8mm, not a 7.92mm that is just called 8mm. So projectiles pulled from "8mm Mauser" cartridges, which are actually 7.9, are a loose fit. I believe this short version of the M95 rifle is called a "stutzen gewehr". In English we would likely call it a carbine. It was originally intended as a convenient, compact weapon for rear area or support troops. I had one made immediately after the end of the war, so it still bore Imperial Austria proofs. Again, if memory serves, the "W" and "19"stamped on the barrel mean it was made in Wien (Vienna) in 1919. No one should try to shoot the newer, larger 8x56 "S" cartridge in this gun. Hopefully it wouldn't fit, but Snuffy can be very inventive in getting incorrect cartridges into a rifle chamber. Steyr made another really cool version of the M95 between the wars by replacing the 8mm barrel with a barrel chambered for 7.92mm Mauser and permanently installing a clip to make it a magazine rifle. Easily recognized by the 7.92 Mauser rear sight. I laughed first time I saw one thinking it was a handyman special. Second time I saw one I snatched it up.
 

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projectiles pulled from "8mm Mauser" cartridges, which are actually 7.9
???

The Mauser S-geschoss is 8.2 mm

Steyr made another really cool version of the M95 between the wars by replacing the 8mm barrel with a barrel chambered for 7.92mm Mauser and permanently installing a clip to make it a magazine rifle.
Steyr didn't make those, Yugoslavia did.
 
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