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Is it a general rule not to dry fire Czech pistols? If so, is it for good reason? I have read in a few posts, I can't remember models, to not dry fire Czech pistols and I have been told not to definitely not dry fire a CZ45. I'm asking if this a legit general rule on Czech variants because they will in fact break the firing pin. Or is this the don't dry fire anything ever thought or the world will explode. It seems I see this comment made on Czech pistols more than anything else. If this is a legit thing does it apply to rifles as well.

I'm wondering if it is just people not wanting to dry fire any firearms ever or if this is a serious issue and not a strict personal preference. I rarely dry fire my things but occasionally I will after cleaning some pistols to function test. I don't have snap caps for every caliber and I probably should make some up but let's remove that from the equation for now.
 

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Some models of Czechoslovakian pistols have very hard/brittle firing pins, the CZ-52 is the best example I can think of. I don't believe this is a serious issue if you buy the guns to collect and occasionally shoot them. Repeated dry fire drills will likely result in broken firing pins, but this is equally true of a lot of older pistol designs, Czech or not. More modern Czech pistols don't seem to have this issue, the CZ-82 and CZ-75 come to mind, but the experience of others may vary.

My thinking is that the firing pins were made hard to ensure they wouldn't deform over time due to long-term use of mil-spec ammunition with hard (more resilient) primers. Either way, I've not heard of this being an issue on Czech rifles and a quick glance at most rifle firing pins will reveal designs with fewer stress risers than are commonly found on handgun firing pins.
 

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I’ve personally broken the tip off of a CZ 52 firing pin dry firing. At that time makarov.com carried replacements and it wasn’t a big deal. The shoulders of the 52 pin where it narrowed to go through the hole in the bolt face snapped right off. I always assumed the pins were made especially hard for the combloc ammo.
 

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I also have broken a CZ-52 firing pin dry firing the pistol. It only takes a few trigger pulls for it to happen.

Vlad
It's really hard to judge how many cycles these firing pins can go through before failure, because there is no way to know how many times a surplus pistol was dry fired before it was imported or even owned by the present owner. Plus, the life of each batch of firing pins might vary depending on the quality of the heat treat and material used. I rarely dry fire any of my firearms, but I'd imagine my CZ-52 has been dry fired by others quite a few times... I'll admit that I don't enjoy hearing the hammer drop on an empty chamber for fear that someone will break it someday.
 

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The problem with the CZ52 is the original material the firing pin was made of. My recollection is they were some sort of cast steel, which doesn't handle impact loads well.

There used to be replacement firing pins on the market (I don't know if you can still get them) which were made of forged steel, and would hold up much better.
 

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The problem with the CZ52 is the original material the firing pin was made of. My recollection is they were some sort of cast steel, which doesn't handle impact loads well.

There used to be replacement firing pins on the market (I don't know if you can still get them) which were made of forged steel, and would hold up much better.
It's hard to imagine an industrial process for making firing pins that would use either castings, or forgings, instead of machining hot or cold rolled bar stock.
 

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I personally broke the tip off of a cz70 pistol, and what happened was that the cz70 is the commercial variant of the cz70 and the cz70 had a rough action, so I wanted to work it without taking it apart, and practice pointing and holding it. I think it was like six to seven hundred dry firings that the pin broke, I was sort of surprise,..no bother then since firing pins I had bought for a couple bucks apiece and a good number of them as spare parts. I have a cz50 I had purchased from empire arms that was a european police seized item I was supposing and it had been dry fired so many times that the firing pin hole was puckered out so I had to grind that "burr" down to eliminate a slam fire, and also on that pistol it had been carried alot in a pocket and someone had cut down the main spring to make it lighter double action trigger pull.
 
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