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About 15 years ago I paid for the custom cherry that Bernie with Old West Bullet Molds uses to cut his molds. AFAIK he is the only person in the US to offer a Dreyse mold. I think I remember using a drawing of the n/A bullet for the mold. EDIT: It was the 1855 bullet. It's available here.

Heinrich Hensel with Hensel bullet molds also offers one here: Langblei
I just purchased a different mold from him a month ago and couldn't be more pleased with the quality. It will take a bit, as you'll have to complete an international wire transfer and wait for the mold to be shipped over. Overall time from the transfer being initiated to receiving the mold was about a month.

Stephan Joan with antiquefirearms.com offered reproduction needles at one time, but has since sold out. You might contact him and see where he had them made.

Where'd you find your needle rifle?
 

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BTW, your Dreyse should be marked with a LA (lange) or a KA (kurz) on the buttstock. These were made with two lengths of butt-stocks to fit the two standard sizes of German at the time. Lange Deutscher and Kurz Deutscher. :LOL:

You can check if your needle is worn by comparing it to a vertical hash mark on the right side receiver rail just behind the chamber.
 

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Here is an original unfired sabot and outer wrapping. The paper is .004" thick.


The four cuts that help release the bullet can be seen at the top.


The base of the sabot showing the rings left from winding the sabot and the unfired priming compound is also visible in it's pocket. There's more priming compound than in a modern musket cap. Wirtgen barely mentions manufacturing of the ammunition in his book (at least from what I can find). The most I've been able to find in the book is his mentioning that Dreyse simply had machines special made to manufacture the sabots. Real detailed. I think these were wound together and then fed into a press that compressed them in dies, possibly heated. It almost has the feel of a piece of Masonite, which conicidentally is also formed using steam heat and pressure.


Diameter of the sabot is .627" or 15.93mm.


Length is .777"
 

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It's difficult to say. Page 74 of Wirtgen's book has two pictures of the Treibspiegel, one of which shows some delamination in the base end of the sabot which supports the theory of a "wound" construction. However, I will note the outer surface of the sabot shows no signs of a vertical paper "edge" that would be there if it were wound. The outer surface has a smooth, mottled look similar to the shiny side of hardboard/Masonite. The more I consider it, the more I'm thinking that these may have been an early form of that (50 plus years before hardboard was invented!) and the top and bottom of the sabot may have had some final turning operating, as you said, on each end to ensure they were all finished to the same length. That final finishing operation may be what gave the concentric lines.

Wirtgen references the Festungs-Waffengeschichtliches Museum Phillipsburg when noting Dreyse having the special machinery made. They may have more information regarding the machines.
 
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papier mache is impossible, it would never stand the stresses. the sabot is coiled and everyone made sabots do this.
From a manufacturing perspective, it would be easy to deal with wood pulp or paper mache as a slurry (a lumber or paper mill byproduct), which is then fed into a heated die to be compressed under high pressure. "Art class" paper mache would certainly be useless.
 
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