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Discussion Starter #1
Ok guys what do these mean im sure it has something to do with decommishening
 

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It would be good to run a google search first. Google something like: Enfield rifle DP "white stripe"

But let me get you started. DP means "drill purpose" which means the rifle was not intended for live-firing once marked this way. It doesn't automatically mean it is unsafe, but one should be really careful before considering firing any DP-marked rifle.

Ironically, I found an old thread that I started asking for clarification on the white stripe. http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?196555-White-Stripe-question
 

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Ok I ask , should DP rifles

be allowed to live ? Or should

they all be dismantled and the

parts used to help ailing non-DP

rifles or those missing parts .



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I wouldn't be opposed to using them either way. I have a decent collection of Enfields at this point so I wouldn't mind actually having a DP rifle in my collection, just to have one.
 

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I wouldn't be opposed to using them either way. I have a decent collection of Enfields at this point so I wouldn't mind actually having a DP rifle in my collection, just to have one.
+1, as long as it's checked over by a good gunsmith before being fired. A couple of British guys mentioned in a recent thread that they recall having completely functional (with the exception of a ground-off firing pin) Enfields in their boyhood schools, so there's the chance that you could get a near-perfect example from a DP rifle.

PSY
 

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Yeah I wouldn't fire it, just be a nice piece to add to the collection...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guys I figured it was something drill. Restocked my 1918 with them, got a bayonet from IMA today stamped DP, with the white stripe, im sure the stripe is to make it stand out from a working weapon.
 

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Yes - you dont want to be firing those old DP bayonets they might explode.

Basically DP means the 'item' (Rifle, bayonet, radio) is beyond acceptable tolerances and is not viable to repair (economical or pratical).
For a Rifle it GENERALLY means that the action has worn thru' the hardening, stretched or twisted and wont headspace. There are examples of 'good' rifles being drawn down into DP usage but, You dont, I dont and your gunsmith probably doesnt have the skill / knowledge / equipment to determine which is which.

Dont fire DP firearms.
 

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Basically DP means the 'item' (Rifle, bayonet, radio) is beyond acceptable tolerances and is not viable to repair (economical or pratical).
Lets not confuse the issue:

DP actually means just "Drill Purpose", ie the rifle/bayonet has been been prepared for non-firing exercise use - drill, assault courses, selection, weapon training, etc.

The rifles for selected and marked for DP use may or may not have been selected because they were out of military gauging limits.

There are many standards of "DP" used by different countries and different units; only a few (UK post-WW2, Australia) are actually described or specified in print, most others are not (including at least five different types from India) and can include everything from scrap to mint/unused rifles.

The UK military terms for general equipment repair status (BLR, BER, etc) are temporary marks and are unrelated to the "DP" marks.
 

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The rifles for selected and marked for DP use may or may not have been selected because they were out of military gauging limits.


The UK military terms for general equipment repair status (BLR, BER, etc) are temporary marks and are unrelated to the "DP" marks.
Aside from the unknown number that were drawn from standard stock (to make up the numbers) isnt it true that DP rifles (as a first choice) were taken from those marked up BER, ZF etc ?
 

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The white stripe it to MAKE SURE you don't get a round near it even if your eyeesight is too feeble to see the DP. Yes some rifles MAY be safe, but do you want to find out the Hard way?,

India, red white red stripes in the reciever area

Australia, for cadets
Greeh stripe: fully serviceable
Yellow stripe: Safe to fire
Red stripe: don't get a live round anywhere near it.
One more, LT for line throwing rifle. They usualy don't have a rear sight as a ship is rather hard to miss.
 

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Aside from the unknown number that were drawn from standard stock (to make up the numbers) isnt it true that DP rifles (as a first choice) were taken from those marked up BER, ZF etc ?
UK DP rifles were usually converted in large batches, and its not likely that a trickle of scrap rifles returned to depots would cover anything like the requirement - even if they were stored instead of being scrapped immediately. I've seen a very large number of DP rifles in my service career and in the civilian gun trade, and don't recall ever seeing a "ZF" stamp or a "BER" paint scar on any of them. I count No1s (no white bands!), L59A1s, UK FN Trials rifles (Para & SF selection) and L1A1 SLRs (replaced the FNs in about 1996). The latter two types of DP were clearly made up from mint condition rifles - sadly.....
 

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I know of a shop that has a No4 rifle on the rack with a large BLR stenciled on the butt. One of the scrubbed and dot matrix serialed rifles. For that I reckon they set the juicy price tag...which is about $100 higher than normal.
 

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I know of a shop that has a No4 rifle on the rack with a large BLR stenciled on the butt. One of the scrubbed and dot matrix serialed rifles. For that I reckon they set the juicy price tag...which is about $100 higher than normal.
We have to be cautious about some of the stencilled marks, as of course UK didn't have a monopoly on the alphabet - and there may be a "BLR" which is in fact a rack marking of some kind. Judging from the number of scrubbed No5s turning up in the US with "BLR" stencilled on them, there is a possibility that these are normal weapons from an asian country.
 
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