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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sometimes people ask about a #3 barrel on a Swede, don't sell them short. This elm stocked 1915 m96b has what I would call a dark bore, probably the worst one of my m96s yet it never ceases to amaze me. For this reason it is perhaps my favorite shooter. Here's a ten shot group at 100 yds. The 10 ring is a 3" across. My load was 44 grains of IMR7828 using 142 grain MKs. Not bad for a near sighted old fart.

Don't sell a threaded barrel short either.

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I wonder how that #3 barrel would group at 600m? Fine looking Swede BTW. Love the look of elm stocks in good sunlight. Haven't had a nice warm sunny day to shoot here since last year. Way last year btw.
If you can see rifling in the barrel, so can the bullet. It's erosion in the grooves that allows blowby. The way around this is a flat base bullet. A full metal jacket has an exposed core where the jacket ends, and gas pressure can open up the base of the jacket to the limits of the lands' depth. The Norma Alaska 156 gr RN bullet does not have an exposed base, but the jacket has a concave base contour that may also expand to seal in the bore. I can't prove this since none of my Swede's have less than #1 bores.

Corrected: grooves vice lands. Never post before 2nd cup of coffee!
 

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Agree on the #3 barrel for a Swede, first military surplus rifle I got to shoot was M-38 with the disc marked for both #2 & #3, of course I had no idea what it meant at the time. The bore looked great to me, rest of the rifle a bit worn but matching. It is among my top three in accuracy and has made more trips to the range than any other rifle. I learned to shoot accurately with this gun. I now bears my own set of scratches and dents from so many outings. My thanks to all the experts on this forum, learning the details and history of the Swedish rifles is appreciated.
Also agree, Great shooting.
 

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Sheepdawg,

From your description of the bore, "has wha. I believe that it is well past a #3t I would call a dark bore", I doubt your bore is a #3. I suspect that it is well past a #3 and if in Swedish military service the barrel would be replaced.

The bore disks on these rifles can not be relied on to tell us the bore condition unless the rifle in question was sold from military stores and imported to this country immediately without being fired and then sold from importer to dealer to you. Any use between the last inspection and your receipt negates the potential for the disk to accurately reflect bore condition. Before your acquisition a previous owner may have pot thousands of rounds through the rifle. Or a previous owner may have shot a couple of round of corrosive ammo and never cleaned the rifle. The stock disk may be one that a previous owner popped in your rifle. There is just no way to know what has happened to your rifle between the last military armory inspection and your possession so the disk can not be relied on to accurately reflect the bore condition. Personal inspection is the only way to determine if the bore is acceptable to you.

If a rifle has a dark bore or frosted bore or even some pitting it may still shoot just fine if the bore has a good crown and strong rifling. Dark bores, frosted bores and pitting only lead to quicker fouling.

Vlad
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sheepdawg,

From your description of the bore, "has wha. I believe that it is well past a #3t I would call a dark bore", I doubt your bore is a #3. I suspect that it is well past a #3 and if in Swedish military service the barrel would be replaced.

The bore disks on these rifles can not be relied on to tell us the bore condition unless the rifle in question was sold from military stores and imported to this country immediately without being fired and then sold from importer to dealer to you. Any use between the last inspection and your receipt negates the potential for the disk to accurately reflect bore condition. Before your acquisition a previous owner may have pot thousands of rounds through the rifle. Or a previous owner may have shot a couple of round of corrosive ammo and never cleaned the rifle. The stock disk may be one that a previous owner popped in your rifle. There is just no way to know what has happened to your rifle between the last military armory inspection and your possession so the disk can not be relied on to accurately reflect the bore condition. Personal inspection is the only way to determine if the bore is acceptable to you.

If a rifle has a dark bore or frosted bore or even some pitting it may still shoot just fine if the bore has a good crown and strong rifling. Dark bores, frosted bores and pitting only lead to quicker fouling.

Vlad
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Granted the disk is not a reliable way of grading a Swedish Mauser bore and after cleaning this one up today I can tell you it is really quite shiny. It just doesn't compare with others in my collection. I have an m41/B with no arrow pointing to a number in that part of the disk pie and a light through it will blind you. The reason for this thread is we get the question asked by the newer collectors about barrels graded as a #3 and I'm here to tell you the Swedish armorers were very picky in grading, if you like the rifle grab it, a #3 bore is really quite good. Nevertheless with bore disks it's caveat emptor. A look at the bore is the only reliable way to judge it. I have bores that look better that will not out shoot this rifle. I truly believe this one is capable of m.o.a. if the guy pulling the trigger could do his job, it's come very, very close.
 
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