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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Pretty much as the title says,
Part of my personal collection is copies of the technical data packages for various firearms, such as the M1 Garand, M1 Carbine, P08 Luger, etc. I would like to expand my collection to include a copy of at least one of these rifles, and I know the data package isn't something that just sat in a locked chest in Stockholm, since variants were built in Egypt and Denmark.
Any help in tracking down where these might be would be appreciated.
Thank you
 

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The Sticky posts above have a few links to parts and a cutaway version . Maybe "Fson" has access to some books ?????????

 

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I have never seen any single specific manual etc. for the Ag m/42 (B).
"Users manual" are to find in fx. Soldiers instruction book for Material, there are several editions from the fifties up to the late sixties.
Spare part lists also from the same periods in different editions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am looking for the Technical Data package, or at least significant portions thereof, without that information, certain bits of insight into the design process are lost entirely, I want to see this window into Erik Eklund and his co-workers minds.
I find it remarkable just how good a gun the AG42B is and considering how minimal the modifications to the original platform were, it is astonishing just how good a Semi-Auto Rifle it is given how quickly it was developed.
The M1 Garand as much as I love it was the culmination of 2 decades of hard work by John Garand, and Springfield Armory, you can tell the amount of refining that went into its design with just how much of the rifle is designed to expedite production.
The AG42 is something different, its official development cycle took only a year, what did Eklund and his team do? What did they copy? What bits of inspiration did they have? Where did they cut corners? We take for granted now having a variety of proven semi-auto mechanisms, but there was alot that was still an open question at the time the AG-42 was designed.
Long story short, I suppose I'm looking for insight into how they created such a good rifle in so little time.
 

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Agreed: Eklund designed the AG42 in remarkable time. The rifle just screams SVT 38 as its inspiration. I am convinced Tokarev rifles found their way to Sweden, either captured by the Swedish volunteers under Gen. Linder or provided by Finland. I also suspect that some prototype AG42's were "field tested" in Finland, although any evidence of that was understandably obliterated.

Of course Eklund dispensed with the SVT 38's gas piston system. The really inspired design innovation was the sliding bolt carrier cover that cocks the action and makes disassembly and reassembly much simpler than the Tokarev's. Of course, anybody that experienced "Ljungman thumb" will have a different opinion of this design.
 

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Ok, the only place I belive you can find anything related to your question are the Krigsarkivet (War archive) in Stockholm.
Documents from the main producers of weapon in Sweden are to find there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Patent documents are always of interest, they often reveal hints or details about evolutionary steps that got abandoned. I'm a bit more interested in the actual manufacturing and hard numbers.
Still thank you.
 
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