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I bought from a estaet a grouping of A W.W.I vet 1st M.G. Unit helmet uniform complete extra insignia paper work, a few German buttons shoulder board belt buckle and this Mace was with it. I thought it may be a souvenior picked up in Europe but upon close look it has a crown proof on it not sure what country. Did not know if they used such a weapon in W.W.I . thanks for any help.
 

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Oh these were used during the war by many countries and are still being used today in warfare.

Patrick
 

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Correct (Medieval) Name is "Mace and Chain"..one of the four Arms a Knight could use in Combat...Lance, Sword, Battle Axe, and Mace and Chain;...Lance and Sword went together, as did Axe and Mace ( for "personal Challenges").

Initially in WW I, they were made by the Regimental Blacksmith, with scrap metal (Wagon Chains, old Gears, lumps of metal, etc); by the end of 1915, the demand was so great, that factories began making them to a pattern (more than one). on all sides of the war. The variety is similar, but almost infinite. JPS should have a lot of info on these.

Doc AV
 

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Field Editor ~ GUNS Magazine, Co-Author ~ Serbian Army Weapons of Victory &PH - Kudu Safaris
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Hello Gents,

While there have been a variety of names applied to these weapons over the years in different languages and in different countries, the generally accepted name for this class of weapon in English is a "flail." This applies to both one-handed version used primarily on horseback or two handed versions used by infantry. The name is derived from the agricultural tool used for threshing grain. Peasants who had to defend themselves with the tools at hand introduced the flail to warfare in the "Dark Ages". Over time, their effectiveness as a weapon was realized and versions produced specifically for war evolved. Various other names include "mace & chain" per Doc's post, "morning star" was often applied to variations like this that have spikes on a round ball as per your example. "Goddendag" is another as used by the Flemish, etc. etc.

The examples of these weapons that were used during WWI represent a myriad of different designs with a wide variety of materials. The head of your example was sand cast and the welded chain would be correct for a weapon that was intended to be used. Decorative examples turn up quite frequently that have butted links in the chain, which would have come appart under real combat conditions.

However, the real problem is that it's near on impossible to determine which trench maces, flails, etc. were actually used in battle or were produced after the war ended as sold as souvenirs to the troops that were soon to be mustered out of the service and on their way home.

That's a very nice example! Hope this info helps.

Warmest regards,

JPS
 

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Anything that would cause some severe blunt trauma was used.
BRGDS, A
 

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My thought on some of the flails used, is that they were actually decorator pieces. But, being suitable for combat, or easily strengthened, they were pressed into service. The Victorian era saw a great interest in medieval arms and armor. A booming business was born. Back then, weapons were made just like the originals. No plastic, or pot metal. Unfortunately, when it comes to clubs, flails, and maces, it's impossible to tell real from fake. The decorators were made as well as originals till the 1950s. And the original "issued" types, were reproduced right after the war.
 

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And let's not forget the good old Linnemman pattern e-tool. I've come across more than one example with one or both sides of the blade sharpened, but not the leading edge. They are light and sturdy and make a very effective one-handed axe.

JPS
 

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And let's not forget the good old Linnemman pattern e-tool. I've come across more than one example with one or both sides of the blade sharpened, but not the leading edge. They are light and sturdy and make a very effective one-handed axe.

JPS
Indeed, Remarque describes just such a weapon in All Quiet on the Western Front
 

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I have a German e-tool, that's sharpened all the way around. If you look at my pictures, the second from left, is a British e-tool handle, with hobnails in the metal collar. Two, are practice grenades, used as clubs.
 
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