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Did the Russia Mosin Nagant PU sniper rifles have cork or rubber under the action of the Rifles in WWII? IF SO. did it help? any photos of this?
 

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I have a never-refurbed 1945 M44 that was partially shimmed at some time in its past, and from the condition of the rifle, and its 'provenance' before I bought it (for $40 off a table at a gun show, where there were many more M44's on the table that were more or less just like it, and NONE of them in terrific condition, and I needed to diddle around some with the interrupter to get the magazine to work right. Sold as parts guns.), I just can't imagine the shim job having been done at any time after it left the factory.

I also have a refurbed hex receiver 91-30 with a prewar stock, and a partial set of shims. I am not as sure of its provenance, but again from the rifle's condition (99+% of its 'original' varnish is still on the stock, and NO metal wear) it looks to me like it picked up these shims during its refurb job. When I bought the rifle, the barrel was already free-floated.

My 1944-dated, unissued, Finn M39 also has a pretty full set of shims, but in its case I am pretty sure they are iron/steel, and not brass.
 

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I have a bag of galvanized steel shims gathered from Mosins by a rather strange collector who disassembled quite a few damaged rifles for parts and gave me a collection of shims.
My snipers don't have shims but some might have had them.
 

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Soviet refurbs are sometimes seen with black finished thicker steel, thinner galvanized steel, or brass shims under the tang, in the magazine pockets (front and/or rear), and occasionally even in the front of the recoil lug pocket. I've never seen a Soviet rifle that was imported with a shim on the recoil lug flat a la Finn, though.

I don't know where to find the link at this point, but a couple of years ago, I saw an ex-sniper posted on one of the forums that had been bedded with some kind of coarse fabric on the tang, underneath the barrel shank, and at the front barrel band. The poster said it had been imported that way, so I'm guessing it was some kind of field expedient.
 

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I have never seen cork or rubber used by the soviets. I have only seen that as a modern attempt at accurizing. I have only seen steel shims, either bare or coated with a black oxide. I do know of a refurbished 91/30 PU that still had a barrel wrap in place.
 

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If one consults the 1934 instructions for the "three-line rifle, model of 1891" and the 7.62mm rifle model 1891/30, there is a whole chapter on accurizing the M91 and M91/30 including the points of contact of the sear and the cocking knob/striker and the use of birch strips and metal shims and wrapped pieces of oiled felt to correctly bed Mosin-Nagant rifle stocks. Best believe with the kill ratios of Soviet snipers that these methods were applied to the PE and PU snipers.

As for "photos" of the procedures, I have no idea.
 

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Have a hungarian pu (vietnam ) that had metal shims under the action (layers of tin compacted/cut squares with holes in the middle )when i took it appart. Have not destocked any finns yet.
 

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If one consults the 1934 instructions for the "three-line rifle, model of 1891" and the 7.62mm rifle model 1891/30, there is a whole chapter on accurizing the M91 and M91/30 including the points of contact of the sear and the cocking knob/striker and the use of birch strips and metal shims and wrapped pieces of oiled felt to correctly bed Mosin-Nagant rifle stocks. Best believe with the kill ratios of Soviet snipers that these methods were applied to the PE and PU snipers.

As for "photos" of the procedures, I have no idea.
I'd love to see that manual. The only time I've seen those procedures mentioned in Soviet literature is in Yur'yev's "Sport Shooting".
 

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Cork and rubber shims....sounds like a former owner put them in.

No harm done but doubt Soviets did it. .. nor Finns.

The Archaeology of shims seems to indicate metal was the preferred shim.
 

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