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While sorting and inventory of my reloading primers I found several boxes of old primers, some very old. Does anyone know the age of these? They are Winchester #5 primers, wooden tray in the box, 100 round box but do not have the "W" on each primer. They are an early style rounded top primer, not the flat top as in modern primers.They are marked for use in the 25-35, 30-30, and 32 Winchester Special cartridges.
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Can't help 'ya, but that's some neat old stuff.
Some collector will be interested, especially with the boxes in such good shape.
Aloha
 

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See if there is a lot # on any of these boxes, sometimes you can decipher a date from them.
Otherwise, ask on a cartridge collecting site, some of those guys have the charts from the old companies.

FWIW, given the print style and the wooden trays, I would, tentatively, put these from between the wars, or maybe, just after WWII (but I don't think so).
A nice find, are there any partial boxes that you can test the primers without losing any real value?
Probably corrosive so clean accordingly.
 

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While sorting and inventory of my reloading primers I found several boxes of old primers, some very old. Does anyone know the age of these? They are Winchester #5 primers, wooden tray in the box, 100 round box but do not have the "W" on each primer. They are an early style rounded top primer, not the flat top as in modern primers.They are marked for use in the 25-35, 30-30, and 32 Winchester Special cartridges. View attachment 3795608 View attachment 3795610
From the label I would say the box certainly pre-dates Olin (Western Ammunition) buying Winchester in 1931. Ammo box styles quickly changed to reflect the new ownership and I would suspect component boxes did too. Considering the specification of "Smokeless Powder" and 1884 being the last Patent date listed I think it's earlier, likely 1900 to 1920 era. IIRC correctly Winchester (and others) started marking an identifier on primers to distinguish smokeless primers from those intended for black powder during that same time period. I have loaded ammo as well as a few examples of primers with the ID stamps in my collection. If none of the primers in the box have the W stamp specified on them I would be suspicous that someone reused the box at some time in the past (not uncommon with old ammo or components in my experience).
 
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