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Krag-Jørgensen Artillerikarabin M/89-24

Here is my artillery carbine. All matching, no import stamp. Somehow it survived the Nazi Occupation of Denmark and is in very good condition. This rifle was built from a M/89 long rifle in 1927. The unit disk on the stock is from the 2nd Feltartilleri Bataljon. I have not shot this rifle enough to determine its accuracy.



















 

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Here is a photos of Danish troops circa 1900 with m/89 Krag rifles.
 

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kriggevaer,
Tis a small world indeed!
Here is my artillery carbine. All matching, no import stamp. Mine was also built from a M/89 long rifle, but in 1924. The unit disk on the stock (guess what) is also from the 2nd Feltartilleri Bataljon.






Best, John
 

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Wow, those are both pretty cool. I have a Danish long rifle coming to me soon. I hope it looks as good as these 2. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Good Stuff!!!

Hej John,

Almost eerie -:D I doubt we will ever know the exact history and way that these rifles got into the USA, but I would guess that at least some of them are vet bringbacks, since there were around 66,000 Danish K-J rifles confiscated by the German occupation and taken to Germany. New information from Denmark is sparse at best, which seems to be due to a generational phenomenon. The pre- and baby boomer age Danes seem to be well aware of the K-J; the post-baby boom folks have very little knowledge of them, unless they are collectors. As with the Swedes, the younger shooters/collectors have interests other than their own country's rifles. But then, it works that way here. I have my 1903 Springfield and an M1 Garand, but I'm not interested in collecting them. Ironic -

And, GregCandR, we are expecting photos of your new K-J :D
 

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Here is my "new" Danish M1889/10 Krag that I just got Friday. (My first Krag!) It came from the large estate sale that's been going on in the Nashville area over the past few months. The numbers on the receiver, barrel and bayonet stud match. The bolt is a mismatch -- however (and this seems really weird to me) the bolt matches the serial number on the stock (!?!?)

Could someone tell me which unit this rifle was assigned to from the stock disc? Thanks!

Oh, I paid $250 far it. Pretty good?
 

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hepcatfox,
Very nice rifle. As far as price goes, from what I have seen these go for lately I think you did very well indeed. Sounds like it was put together from 2 rifles.

I like the wood grain on the butt stock. Very nice, thanks for sharing it with us.
 

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Hi Gary,
That is a very nice and very unique K-J. The single shot receiver K-J rifles are very interesting, but there is not a lot of information about them. Some were made to serve as target rifles. I have a single shot receiver marked,
M.1928 and made in 1929. The M.1928 rifles were the sharpshooter rifles, but all the ones I have seen were repeaters. I have also seen target rifles built by private sector Danish gunsmiths using the single shot receivers, but I did not note the model stamping.

Other single shot receivers were used to build the Grønland Riffel which was chambered for the .45-70 (11.44x53R) cartridge. The Grønland rifles were used by the hunters of Greenland for the Royal Danish Fur Trading enterprise. Mostly seals I believe.

Your rifle has features that are found on the Grønland Riffel, such as, the "P" above the serial number. I believe most of the Grønland Riffel were stamped with a P and a serial number that was not in sequence with the military rifle numbering system. The long turned down bolt handle is identical to the ones used on the Greenland rifles. But, your stock has differences from the Grønlanders I have seen and the forearm definitely looks like it was intended for target shooting.

Some of the Grønland Riffel are still being used by the Inuit hunters in Greenland. I'll see if I can get Umimmak to add his knowledge - if he isn't out hunting seals or shooting trout with his .22:D

In any case, a very unique and good looking rifle.
 

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Hello Kriggevaer

I was just looking af your M.89 and noticed, that the serialnumber (58127)was rather close to mine (58026). It's still a long M.89 and not shortened to a karabin.

The unit disc belongs to "Hærens Flyvetropper" - the early flying units later Royal Danish Air Force.

(The item is now sold to a new owner)
 

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Artillerikarabin

Hi

I want to share my new Artillerikarabin with you. As you can see, my unit disc is the same (2 FAR) as two others on this thread (Kriggevaer and JK).

It's build in 1913 and have all matching numbers and a good bore. Notice, there is no letter prefix A in front of the serialnumber.

Regards
Amore2
 

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Hello all, I finally got around to snapping some pictures of my M1889/10 Danish Krag long rifle so here they are. I purchased this rifle online from AuctionArms back in November of 2003 for $375. Unfortunately, the yazoo who I purchased this from didn't care enough to package it properly. He just wrapped it in an old blanket and stuffed it in a box. Needless to say, by the time it got to my dealer, the stock was cracked in two at the wrist! When I contacted the seller, he said this kind of thing had only happened to him a few other times. What a moron! Anyways, I sent the stock out to Rick Borecky and he repaired it for me. You can still see where it was cracked, but you really got to look. He did an excellent job on it! The rifle is in otherwise very nice condition. Most of the blueing has turned to patina and the bore is good with nice rifleing and some darkness, although no pitting. All the parts have matching serial numbers. The root of the bolt handle also has an additional number, 19, stamped on it, although I don't know its significance. There are no import marks to be found. She does a nice job of keeping my M1898 U.S. Krag company, but now I need to find a nice Norwegian Krag to complete the triumvirate. This is one of the few rifles in my collection I have not fired. I see that brass and dies are available, but seem to me to be a steep investment for a rifle I would probably only fire once every year or two. I would enjoy the chance to see how she would perform on the range one day. Anyways, hope you enjoy the pictures!
 

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Sorry, somehow these two didn't get posted on the first go round.
 

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This is the Krag that my dad bought me about 20 years ago when i first started hunting. I have been doing some research on it, and I am still not sure exactly what model it is. All serial numbers match except the butt plate.
 

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Hi loosenut,

You have a sporterized Norwegian Krag-Jørgensen. From the serial number, I believe it may have been a M/1904 Engineer carbine. If it is a 1904, it was a rare variation with only some 2,750 made, according to Hanevik.
 

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Here's a bayonet that i found in mississippi while i was cleaning a 'horders' house. I'm a noob, and the pictures are not the best, but any identification would be
helpful. From what i've found i though it was for a M/1889 krag.
Oh and its made by AC&S
(pic 1 - 9B 540) (pic 2 - 47241) (pic 3 - crown w/ 97)

snapshot (1).jpg snapshot (2).jpg snapshot (3).jpg snapshot.jpg
 
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