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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I just bought my first Mauser. It is in battle shape and I had some questions about it. I am mainly wondering if the red paint on the butt stock signifies anything. Also the bolt has almost no markings on it except A2 under the bolt handle. It also has no blueing is this normal or has it been rubbed off? I read something about soldiers using antifreeze to keep their guns from freezing up. Also why is the crest scrubbed? I will post pics. I have searched all over and found bits and pieces about this gun but would like to learn as much as possible. Any other clues as to when this gun was made, value, etc would be awesome. I paid 135 for it. I really appreciate any help- Thanks
 

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Romanian King Michael rifle that continued in Romania and had the crest removed after the rise of communism in that country (ie. after world war II).

It is a VZ 24 manufactured in Czechoslovakia and sold under contract to the Romanians.

You bought a $225 rifle for $135.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
wow thats awesome thanks for the reply. I just took the gun apart to clean it and there are no serial numbers or markings anywhere else on the gun.
 

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The red strip on butt is probably for trainning rifle, some times is a Instructie stamp there.
 

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I'd of give 135 for it in a heartbeat.
 

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Normal for a VZ24 to only have a sn# on the bolt, receiver and stock. Other parts were not numbered unless the contract called for them to be numbered. When the Germans pressed the VZ24 into service (G24t) they usually numbered more of the parts in typical German fashion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Do you know anything about the blueing? has it just rubbed off over time? Do you think the gun was a training rifle as AndyB said?
 

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Do you know anything about the blueing? has it just rubbed off over time? Do you think the gun was a training rifle as AndyB said?
Many of the Romanian rifles, Vz 24s and others, have rather worn blueing. It has just rubbed off over time with use.

flyfish said:
How can I tell if this gun matches?
Look for serial numbers. If the ones on the rifle match (and all the ones that should be there are) it is all matching.
Serial numbers can be found all over a rifle. Where just depends on the model. Some of the old German Mausers have serial numbers on almost every part.
 

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The crest is King Carol rather than King Michael. Most were Carol, only a few toward the end of the contract were Michael. Some had year "crests" instead of the King crests. I have heard that a very few at the end of the contract had no crest at all. The Carol and Michael crests were scrubbed post war.

The R in the serial number indicates Romanian contract: AR, BR, CR, DR, etc. As said, the rifle had serial numbers only on the left of the receiver ring, top of the bolt handle, and left butt of the stock. Originally the bayonets and scabbards were serial number matched to the rifle. Rifles and bayonets were also marked with a variety of CM Romanian acceptance markings. Sometimes the Romanians would stamp the serial number on the stock (a second time) and on the floorplate during rebuild.

Your rifle is a VZ24 (for model 1924). A K98 is a Polish rifle, a K98k is a German rifle (although a lot of people call them a "K98").
 

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Geladen so what do you think this gun is worth?
It's hard to be exact without full information. Romanian VZ24 rifles are not uncommon. It is a little better to have enough of the crest remaining to tell what it was, rather than being totally scrubbed. The amount of blue remaining has a lot to do with value and you have almost none left. Matching numbers have a lot to do with value and it is unlikely your stock and bolt match the receiver - but I don't know if they do or not. What I can see of the stock looks OK but rough. Any cracks other than minor cracks in the handguard hurt value. On your rifle it comes down to bore condition and I don't know that. At least you have a correct Czech bolt.

Assuming no cracks, if the bore is only fair, $125-145. Very good bore, $175-200. Like new bore (highly unlikely) $250.

It's a good representative example of a VZ24. It was used by the Romanians who fought with the Germans against the Soviets in WWII. You can get the missing cleaning rod from Springfield Sporters and VZ24 bayonets are common, especially Romanian VZ24 bayonets right now. It's probably not worth much more than what you paid for it unless the bore is really good, but it IS a WWII Mauser. Enjoy it.

I paid $200 + 16.50 tax for a King Carol VZ24 in April 2009. That was at a gun show with no shipping and no transfer fee. It had a more complete crest, a lot more blue, and a nicer stock that matched the receiver serial number (but not the bolt number). The bore was fair to good. Naturally I like to think it was worth more than what I paid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks to everyone for your help. This is the best gun forum that I have been on so far. I am new to collecting but just applied for my c&R so I am sure there will be many more Mausers to come. So far I have an Enfield MrkIIII an 1892 colt lightning, and this Mauser and I am hooked. Mosin Nagant is next purchase. Thanks again!
 

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You may well get a better example of a Romanian King Carol VZ24 rifle later, but keep this one. When you have 200 Mausers, you will still have this one as MY FIRST MAUSER.
 

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Recently purchased a Czech K98 from 1945/46 from the original owner that had it sitting in his safe for years. When he orginally purchased it was in a crate in cosmoline. It has all matching numbers and he told me it was never issued and he only shot it a few times since he had it. Interested in what the markings mean if anyone can help.
 

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It would be better to start a new thread rather than to attach your new subject to an old 2011 thread - but what is done is done.

The small lion symbol on both the barrel and receiver is the Czechoslovak firing proof. There should be one on the bolt also. That type of proof is a way to ID a post war K98k rifle. The correct designation is VZ98N rather than K98k. The WaA63 acceptance marking on top of the barrel indicates that the barrel was inspected and accepted before the end of the war. The other barrel markings indicate the barrel supplier.

Your receiver had a large lion crest which was scrubbed for export. Some were, some were not scrubbed. 4808M is the serial number. The upper case M suffix indicates post war finishing of the rifle. Wartime rifles used lower case suffixes. Mine has an I suffix which is a bit before yours; it still has the dou.45 receiver crest because that was stamped before the end of the war (but the s/n was stamped post war).
 
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