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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know how to fix the decocker on the cz-52 so it works? If so please share information. I would like to fix mine. thank you. John
 

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Depends on what your problem is. What is supposed to be wrong with it?

The firing pin of the CZ-52 is NOT spring loaded, and so, decocking the hammer with a round in the chamber may bounce the firing pin forward enough to cause a discharge.


In a battlefield situation, this may be acceptable, but IMO, in civilian life, the decocker should only be used to let the hammer fall on an empty chamber.
 

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He's Got it!

Although the Czech Arsenals did a "fix" on the decocker of the CZ-52 (pistols stamped with a "Z" at the rear base of the trigger bow had this done) as a general rule, we NEVER trust the decocker on a Czech-O-Matic.

If you're curious, you can drop a pencil with a rubber eraser down the CLEARED barrel and snap the trigger - the pencil will fly out, and I've driven them into the ceiling doing that.

Then try it with the decocker and if the pencil so much as twitches, it is NOT safe!

But even if your decocker passes this test with flying colors...

DON'T TRUST IT!

At best, use it instead of the trigger to let the hammer down on an empty chamber. If your thumb slips, it is not so apt to damage the issue firing pin, which in some cases can be brittle.
 

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I ALWAYS firmly plant my thumb on that hammer when using the decocker on a Czech-o-Matic, even if it does pass the pencil test...better safe than sorry.
 

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When I decock using my thumb on the hammer, I place my index finger of left hand between hammer and gun as an extra safety.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
decocker

Thank you for the information. What I wanted to know is how can the decocker be fixed?. Not how to test it. What makes the decocker not work right? There must be a fix for it. John
 

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"Fix"?

"How do you fix it", you ask?

In a nutshell; you don't.

We simply don't trust it and live with it that way.

You see, this is more of a design flaw than any sort of mechanical issue per se.
Most auto pistol decockers employ some sort of effective firing pin block, often in conjunction with the safety.

The COM does not; although it blocks the forward travel of the hammer towards the end of it's swing, it is hardly reliable.

......


With the pistol UNloaded, push the safety lever all the way UP hard and HOLD it up firmly as the hammer drops and stops.
Then as you slowly let the lever down, you may notice the hammer drop a fraction of an inch more through the final arch of it's movement, contacting the breech of the firing pin.

If you are somewhat less than firm when you actuate the DC, the hammer may fall with enough force to kick the DC lever back down and out of the way of it's path and back down against your indecisive thumb, allowing it to retain sufficient momentum so as to deliver a whack to the firing pin sufficient to fire a round.

The Czechs were very clever and innovative in their firearms designs, and I'm really surprised that they let this one get by them.

In order to "fix" the DC problem, you would essentially have to re design and build at least the rear end of the slide and fire control system in the frame if not the whole bloomin' pistol.

And that, podnah, just ain't worth it!

John M. Browning's venerable old M1911 .45 never saw a need for a decocker, and it seems to have done pretty well over the past 98 years or so without one.

I also opine that they could have just as well made the CZ-52 as a double action system. That elongated trigger bow really looks as if it was designed for one. That feature alone would have given it a practical one-up on the Tokarev.
As it is, the main distinction between the two systems is that the CZ is bigger, heavier and, some contend, not as strong an action as the TT-33.

......


Drilling that hole right through the breech under the chamber for the camming block retaining pin did the structural integrity of that critical area no good at all, and to my lights was an utterly stupid thing to do.

......


Don't get me wrong; the ol' COM is a really jiffy pistol for the money.

It's not like the Czech Armorers to do stupid things...

... but they seemed to have pulled a couple of corkers on this one.

Perhaps they burned a little too much of the midnight vodka while getting the CZ-52 on paper in time to meet production quotas; who knows?

It's a cool pistol that could have been an utterly amazing sidearm, well ahead of it's time.
Unfortunately it was never allowed to achieve it's full potential.

Perhaps someday a talented Gunsmith might be able to conceive what it could have been....

... And build one!

If he does it right, it would probably take all the 9mm winchester magnums you could stuff in it, and would ring the gongs out to 300 yards or more.
For God's sake, never try that sort of modification in any present incarnation of the CZ-52!

But as a model for an entirely new handgun which is based on that essential design, correcting the deficiencies of the original while improving upon it's strengths, it certainly offers tantalizing potential.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
decocker

Uncle Jaque thank you for the information. I thought I was misunderstood. Also the information on the hammer spring helped alot. I couldn't find my new one as it flew across the room. So I had to put the old one back in. But I was able to get it back in the first try doing it your way. Thanks John
 

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***~~~BO~I~OI~I~ooooooiiing!!!~~~***

Those durn springs certainly do fly once they get loose of ya, don't they?!

If you think that a mainspring is a booger to recover after it's ricocheted around the room a few times, then try finding one of those teenie weenie little sear springs when they take flight... as they are VERY wont to do!

And boy - o - boy!; Don't them little suckers FLY?!!

If and when you ever do find your spring (time to clean the shop anyway, perhaps?) you might consider using a cutting disc on a Dremel (or similar) tool and hack off about a 16th of an inch or one turn of the coil, then grind it down about a 32nd at a time until it goes back in and allows the hammer to cock and the action to cycle without undue resistance.

Good luck!
 

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Decocker

You can phone Shannon Jennings at 1-865-966-4545.He is a gunsmith who has fixed a lot of the decocker problems and is very honest person.
 

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Have you noticed how you have to take the safety OFF, moving the lever downwards, before you can decock the system?

....

With the pistol UNloaded, push the safety lever all the way down hard and HOLD it down firmly as the hammer drops and stops.
Perhaps I've overlooked some element of the conversation, but the pistol is decocked by moving the safety lever up, not down.
 

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Update on De-Cocker "Fix":

With my "Old Gray" COM I have noticed that the decocker would often trip the hammer prematurely when I engaged the safety.

The other day while at an informal shooting session, I was all loaded up and getting ready to knock holes in stuff down range, when out of the corner of my eye I spotted a couple of the guys sauntering downrange with a fresh target, having neglected to advise the "hot" line of their intentions before moving out.

Of course I immediately went into "Cease Fire" mode, and keeping my muzzle downrange away from my downrange buddies engaged the safety as I had a live one in the chamber, prepatory to clearing the weapon.
As soon as I did - "Snap" went the hammer, as the touchy decocker dropped it.

"Well now; we've got to fix this!" I sputtered to myself.

About a week later i did, too.

Of course before we can "fix" something, we have to understand how it works. In tearing the pistol down, it didn't take me too long to discover it.

The cylindrical "drum" of the safety is notched out about half way down it's width between the side walls of the frame in order to clear the sear, which retains it in the frame.

The largest portion of this cut-out has a 90* angle, leaving a quarter round "wedge" in place connecting the ends of the drum. A narrower section on the left side goes straight across the diameter line of the drum creating a shelf or "shoulder" on that side of the cutout.



When the safety is pushed up beyond it's engagement detent, the corner or shoulder of this half-sectional cutout contacts the left side of the lower sear or "foot", and as the safety drum rotates further forward, it pushes the sear foot forward and out of engagement with the hammer notch, thus dropping the hammer.

Of course the sear still rotates backwards, lifting the firing pin lockout plunger lifter arm and hand to unlock the firing pin, so that if the hammer strikes the firing pin hard enough, it would fire a chambered round.

...Must have been the vodka...

So i decided that if the DC feature was so blasted dangerous, I would simply deactivate it entirely.

Upon examination of my safety tumbler, I could see a distinct bright spot indicating a contact point where it had bee wearing against the sear foot.



So if I could move the edge of that shoulder back a bit, I reckoned, it would not contact the sear foot quite so soon and give me a little more breathing room between the safety notch and de-cock.

Gripping the safety in the jaws of a "Pin Vise", I set to work with a small triangular file and dropped the angle of the shoulder from the axis to the circumference about a degree and a half.



It's a challenge to get that angle flat and the corners all square!

After cleaning the safety, I rotated the drum around in a bit of fine wet or dry paper to smooth out some of the rough machining marks.
You don't want to go too far with this or the safety will become sloppy!



With the safety and sear re installed in my CZ-52, I could still de cock the hammer, but it required more travel of the lever and the hammer would "catch" about half way down, and I frequently had to let the lever back down a little to allow it to drop the rest of the way.

That seemed to be a step in the right direction - but after the slide was back on, I discovered that the lever hit the bottom of the slide wall before activating the decocker.
So now, essentially, the decocker no longer decocks.
Which is fine by me, frankly; if we can't trust the blasted thing, why have it functional in the first place?

I suppose that if one were to cut that shoulder back at a little less angle, they might preserve the de-cock function after a fashion... but would it even then be really "safe"?

Quite frankly, i'm not so sure that it would be.
So I'll get along just fine without it.

Now I'm not suggesting that everyone in here grab a file and have at it - I'm just sharing how I did it for your amusement.

One has to be pretty circumspect when doodling around with sears and safeties, you know.
 

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Well "DUH!!!"

Perhaps I've overlooked some element of the conversation, but the pistol is decocked by moving the safety lever up, not down.
You is absa-tootly correct, promofo!

And when I posted here, it occurred to me that I hadn't shot my Czech O Matic in quite some time - so the following weekend I dug one out and went to the range...

And boy-O-boy, didn't I feel stupid when I realized that I had my safety all upside - down and I'd posted some bogus, if not completely bassakwards info.

I hate it when that happens! *~{B^{P~

But thanks for the wake up call; I've edited my erroneous post to hopefully move it a little closer to reality!

I now stand correctified, rectified, edified, sanforized, and completely embarassed!
 

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The only good things about these pistols is that they are cheap. Consequently, a person can file and hammer on them to their heart's content in an effort to get them to function. If you foul up in your efforts, you haven't really lost much. Even the Czechs weren't much impressed with them.
 
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