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I just picked up a spare cut off. It doesn't have a hole in it, but I've seen many on auctions sites that do have a hole in them. Any one know what the hole is for?
 

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Not sure what the hole is for, but a cutoff sans hole is for the No1MkV trials rifle...don't run into one of them every day.
 

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It is called a "viewing hole." It is to make it easier to ascertain whether or not the magazine has bullets in it.
 

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Cutoff Hole?

One can readily see whether there are cartridges in a "cut-off" magazine by looking at the front end...the Points of the Bullets are visible, as the cut-off does not obscure them.

More likely a machining necessity, holding the Cutoff in an aproppriate Jig during machining certain details of its surface. The "viewing port" idea may have just happened to be a secondary effect....same as the "hole" opposite the riveted front lip of the magazine Box #3 (for adjustment of the front mag lip from RN to Spitzer projectiles)...the hole was to allow the rivetting to be done.

Regards, Doc AV
AV Ballistics.
 

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Its a tooling hole for locating on a jig when machining it.

An "urban myth" is that Tommy inserted his bullet and twisted the tip off thus creating a "dum-dum". Often wonder if Fritz started that rumour.
 

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I have in the files, a couple of photos of a WWI German in uniform with a Lee inserting a round into the cutoff to demonstrate how the treacherous Tommies made the Dum Dums. I wish I knew the source.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Rats!

Not sure what the hole is for, but a cutoff sans hole is for the No1MkV trials rifle...don't run into one of them every day.
Well, if that's the case, I bought the wrong one!!
 

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I have in the files, a couple of photos of a WWI German in uniform with a Lee inserting a round into the cutoff to demonstrate how the treacherous Tommies made the Dum Dums. I wish I knew the source.

That would be a pretty good trick if the kraut was able to manage it.
However it wouldn't work.
In any case, cutting off the tip could result in the lead leaving the barrel, but the jacket remaining there. and you wouldn't get proper expansion in any case.
The standard Mk7 bullet will tumble on impact, thus giving the germans the impression that it was (explosive or a hollow point)
 

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Back in the days of paid deer cullers in this country,when they were issued surplus .303 rifles and ball ammo (there was little sporting ammo available),it was common practise to alter the FMJ ammo by either cutting the tip of the bullet off with a pair of fencing pliers,or else converting it into a hollow point with a small jig that was made for the purpose,so as to more readily expand (hopefully) and kill deer.I can't say it has never happened,but I have never heard or read about the jacket and core separating and the jacket staying in the barrel.And an awful lot of ammo was converted in this way.
 

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My question then would be, did anyone ever look at the recovered bullets to see what expansion took place? Normaly a lead tipped or hollow point bullet requires a different jacket so it will open up properly.
 

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soft point 303's

Many years ago here in Oz before the availability or popularity of reloading bush shooters would get hold of an ex military SMLE, butcher the woodwork to 'sporter' config...then because issue Mk V11 ammo was all they had they 'made' their own soft point bullets for more effect on pigs etc.

The method a lot of 'em used was to place the bullet crosswise on an axe blade so that the blade rested about where the fibre or aluminium tip was, then whack the bullet hard with a mallet or similar...then the 'tip' was cut off exposing the lead...

Crude in the extreme...bloody dangerous in that sometimes the core would blast straight through leaving the 'jacket' in the barrel....you can imagine what happened when the next round was fired behind it...a one eyed pig shooter.... :)

Luckily Mr. 'Super' came along and sold soft point 303 projectiles...then a lot of hunters simply pulled the Mk 7 (ha ha usually with nail puller pliers....:) and re seated the 150 grain soft point.

Things sure were rough and ready in Oz....and dont ask me how I know....
 
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