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What is the correct finish for an 1895 Chilean mauser Loewe cavalry carbine? I have seen pictures on this forum of both blued and in the white specimens? For in white specimens how is corrosion averted? Also is the stock supposed to a glossy laquer type finish? It is a gorgeous rifle with the bolt one number off from the rest (maybe a campfire switch?). Any and all replies are welcome and much appreciated.
 

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Thanks, jst out of curiousity why do some members here have them in the white? I personally think they look good that way, but that they would be very prone to corrosion. Also what is the best way to polish a bolt body? I have the Chilean carbine, a Finn 91/30 Tang date is 1896 rebarreled in 1941, and a Finn M39 tang date 1898, also rebarreled in 1941. The bolts on all of these are functional but really show their age is there any way to clean them up?
 

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you may not

really want to. You have to remember that these old guns have oil soaked into them. When you clean it off and polish them, it sets them up for rust. Having said that, I have polished the bolts and buffed the bluing on several nice guns and have them looking better. Just kind of a philosophical question.

I thought the bolt on my new to me 1895 swedish carbine wasn't matched and was bubbaed. However, when I cleaned it with a wire wheel and buffed it, I found that the bolt was indeed a match and junk and a little corrosion had made it look that way.

I really enjoy cleaning my guns until you can eat off them. I do that by using solvents and q-tips. it is awsome the bluing you can find under dirt that doesn't even look like it is there. My most respected friend in the gun world and world in general has councilled me strongly against using cleaners that will get all the oil out of the metal. I was cleaning up a stock that had been bubbaed with walnut stain using q tips and formbys refinisher. I don't know what is in that stuff, but it will also clean bluing just awsome. I just make it a point to reoil the gun s right after cleaning.

I have 2 of the short chilean antique carbines. In my opinion, those guns have such a characteristic look that you really don't want to do much cleaning on them. They were used so much that the bluing just wore off. I have one all matching with excellent bluing and one without. I like the one without much better. It also has beautiful patina on the stock. It is clear to me that any formbys anywhere on that one would ruin it. I have cleaned the metal and wood with balistol and that is it. If you polish and bruch and clean the metal, you can get a cleaner looking chilean carbine, but that is what it looks like -- not a new chilean carbine--just one that has been cleaned up. just think a lot before you do anything. I keep turks and russian guns around to mess with when I get the itch to clean. Then I don't mess up anyting in the process. Just my 2 cents, mauserdoc
 

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Down the main page you can see a pic. of the chilean carbine with the correct finish on it blue. For mausers in the white I have used A compound called FRTIZ on a receiver with good results.:rolleyes:
 

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What is the correct finish for an 1895 Chilean mauser Loewe cavalry carbine? I have seen pictures on this forum of both blued and in the white specimens? For in white specimens how is corrosion averted? Also is the stock supposed to a glossy laquer type finish? It is a gorgeous rifle with the bolt one number off from the rest (maybe a campfire switch?). Any and all replies are welcome and much appreciated.
M1895 Chilean rifles, short rifles and carbines originally had BLUED receivers (rust blued; white inside). Bolts were left in the white. Most other parts were also blued; a few such as the ejector housing, mag follower and stock band retaining springs, were nitre-blued.

The Chilean crest was not deeply roll-marked and is often faint on well-used guns, and the metal may look nearly white. But if the barreled action is removed from the stock, the blue usually is evident where it was protected by the wood.

The wood was oil finished, though after many years of handling and oiling it may show a patina that looks almost like thin, hand-rubbed varnish. That "look" is strikingly beautiful and classy, and is almost impossible to duplicate by refinishing. If you remove it, you've lost it.

M
 

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I can remember buying Chileans when they were first arriving in the US back in the 1960s, blued barrel and receiver, and polished bolts in every one. Makes me wish I had been smart enough to buy and hang on to 4-5 of them back then.

LLS
 
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