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Given the left-ward leanings of NH, they can freeze for all I care.

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Cord wood becoming premium in NH

LEBANON, N.H. - Rising energy prices is driving up demand for cord wood and creating a shortage in some areas of northern New England.

Firewood sellers say they can't keep up.

"Right now I'm refusing work," said Bob Baker. "I had one customer who wanted 14 cords of tree-length wood. I said, 'Good luck.' "

Baker, a retiree from Ryegate, Vt., has been running a small-scale firewood operation for six years on his land.

He estimates he's running about 30 cords behind.

In Orford, Stacey Thomson worries about having to turn away new customers.

Karl Nott of Hartford, Vt., eagerly awaits his next shipment of felled trees.

Dealers and timber industry experts attribute the firewood shortage partly to competition.

Paper mills in Maine and Quebec are offering around $180 a cord for pulp logs that make good kindling, according to Stephen Long of Corinth, Vt., co-founder and coeditor of Northern Woodlands magazine.
 
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BR: "Given the left-ward leanings of NH, they can freeze for all I care."

Me: Nah, the New Hamsters are like we Mainers. Cold doesn't really bother them. But it apparently has occurred to the Hamsters that their HARD CIDER might freeze, and this is a significant concern. Hence the run-up in home heating fuels.
 

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I have a Great supplier for our needs .

Oak,Hickory,Cherry,Apple Does not matter .

I still pay $70.00 per cord .

Burn through about $ 240.00 worth a week , Year 'round .

Although , it was $ 60.00 In the Spring before Gasoline went up .
 

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I smell a business opportunity here. I can move a bit east to Stockton, buy up foreclosed homes, demolish them, and sell the wood the New Hampshire!
 

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I smell a business opportunity here. I can move a bit east to Stockton, buy up foreclosed homes, demolish them, and sell the wood the New Hampshire!
Yeah , I've been thinking about this ;

Buy a couple hundred acres here in Ky .(cost maybe a hundred grand).

Clear cut it & truck the wood out to areas like new england ect.

Subdivide the land out at 12 grand per lot .

Contract for deed is very popular here .

$2500 down & 250.00 per month .

If they default , you get your land back to resell , BUT now it's improved.
 

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BR: "Given the left-ward leanings of NH, they can freeze for all I care."

Me: Nah, the New Hamsters are like we Mainers. Cold doesn't really bother them. But it apparently has occurred to the Hamsters that their HARD CIDER might freeze, and this is a significant concern. Hence the run-up in home heating fuels.
Use the cider as fuel ???
 

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Let 'em burn their carbon credits. Or maybe thoughts of Al Gore making all that money off his scam will keep them warm.
 

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Ask me about my 390 lbs mother in law.
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Not everybody from New Hampshire is a liberal puke. The reason the area votes the way it does is because of the "new breed" who moved up there. They run away from Taxachussets, New Dork, and Conniecutup because they say the taxes are too high. What do they do? They move north to the rural areas of New Hampshire and when enough of them get together they take over. The buy an old farm and complain they don't have garbage pickup, they don't have city water and sewer. Next step is to have all of that added to the town budget which skyrockets the taxes. The old people have to sell out because of the higher tax rate, which makes even more room for the "new breed" to come in and take over. After a few years the new breed has taken over the values of the people in the state because there are more of them now than the original folks who were born there. Now the "new breed" says to themselves, "boy taxes are getting to be a problem here. Guess we will have to move where the tax rates are lower." Call it economic reconstruction. Sherman couldn't have done it better in the south.
 

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I can't vouch for the upper eastern US but Canada and the North west are grinding up trees as fast as they can and making Diesel fuel. Yep a new sophisticated form of bio diesel. As far as the Yankee liberal jerks freezing. They don't. They come down here in November through March drive 20 miles and hour and pi_ _ me off in general.

"If it's tourist season. Why can't we shoot em."
 

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Let 'em burn their carbon credits. Or maybe thoughts of Al Gore making all that money off his scam will keep them warm.
LOL!
 

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I can't vouch for the upper eastern US but Canada and the North west are grinding up trees as fast as they can and making Diesel fuel. Yep a new sophisticated form of bio diesel. As far as the Yankee liberal jerks freezing. They don't. They come down here in November through March drive 20 miles and hour and pi_ _ me off in general.

"If it's tourist season. Why can't we shoot em."

You have a valid point.

A lot of them drive thru here on their way to Florida with their handicap stickers and back up traffic.
 

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Unfortunately they still make their way to Florida. Try going into a restaurant for a quick meal at lunch when you only have 30 minutes. Every place is packed with retirees holding up the lines.

Does Soylent Green burn? That might be an alternative energy source. :p
 

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Amazing how history repeats itself...
Some of you may be too young to remember the "gas crunch" of the 70's. That was a matter of supply and not price, you could buy all the gas you could find, when and if you could find it. Home heating cost went through the roof. People turned their thermostats down to a little over freezing and sat around wearing coats and sweaters complaining.
Top that off with a series of record cold winters and more than usual heavy snow and blizzards.

At that time, married for a few short years with two young kids, we bought our first house. It was a several hundred year old cheesebox and the cold winter wind whistled through it like a screen house. Our first discovery upon moving in was the collapsed chimney inside the wall, discovered after wife decided to make a hole in the plaster to see if there was once a fireplace in there.
Stuck with the prospect of a cold winter with no heat ...
My first homeowner chore was to build a new chimney, all three stories of it.
Young, dumb, and prone to over engineering, it was 3 12x12 flues, 6' wide and 40' tall.
One for the oil boiler (radiator hot water heat).
One for the wood stove (in a fake fireplace in the livingroom)
One for the fancy Danish wood/coal boiler combo in the basement.
That necessitated the expense of the Buck Stove and the Tasco boiler, with related plumbing.

Again, being young, dumb and full of energy, I teamed up with a partner from work cutting and hauling our own wood. The time involved in cutting, hauling, splitting turned into an almost full time occupation! I was able to stack 6 cord high mountain of wood by the garage ... for several years ... every winter.

Getting a brick layer to help me complete the monster project and the tale of the actual construction is a whole separate story unto itself. We lit the first fire on Halloween night when we finally capped her off, by which time, I was already running the oil burner through the half finished chimney all month as it was cold!

With some creative duct work and fans, I found I could heat the entire house off the wood stove down to about 20 degrees.
Firing the wood/coal boiler with wood was a failure.
You could stand in front of it all day chucking in logs and never make any heat.
Coal, on the other hand, was akin to running a nuclear reactor!
Built a coal bin in the basement and a local concern pulled up to the window and dumped two tons a winter down the chute. At $125 @ ton, that was dirt cheap!

Gathering at my house became very popular among the neighbors, accustomed to wearing their coats and sweaters indoors when it reached 15 below zero that winter.
We usually had the windows cracked open and lounged around in our underwear.

There are very valid reasons why folks got away from burning coal and wood.
The manual labor of cutting, hauling, splitting, stacking, carrying and stoking meant picking up each piece of wood a good dozen times for each chunk.
Stoking the coal every four hours, digging out and hauling the ash, methane explosions, sulfur residue corrosion and other "nasty" factors of coal were a constant chore.
Not to mention, the grand chimney fires! I experienced more then one Vesuvius event. Neighbors got rather used to fire trucks blocking the street!

We got through the crunch of the 70s with plenty of heat and cheap but the labor involved was something I do not care to repeat!

The current house was built with a huge brick fireplace that stays lit most of the winter, for show, even though it does provide enough heat to keep the gas bill down a bit. Since the kids grew up with a fire going all the time, they insist on having one going just because.
One cord keeps me going most of the winter and I don't begrudge the price of having it delivered and stacked.
I still have the chainsaw that humped its way through tons of wood but I'm too old to go through that again! Even the effort of carrying logs into the house now turns into a battle over who is going to do it.
Wifey is already carping about ordering several cords for this winter!
 

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as Buckshooter stated the commie BS here is relativly new and due 100% to Massholes and Connecticunts moving here in droves for cheap real estate and taxes or send their rotten spawn here for cheaper collages, and to a huge influx of drug dealing minorities into Manchester and other cities from the cesspools of Lowell and Lawrence Mass.

the high cordwood prices are simply because everyone up here is now dumping there oil fired furnance for wood and wood pellet stoves.
i had to buy 100 gallons of oil this week (i use oil mainly for my hot water) and it was $4.59 a gallon!!!

you dont have to worry about me ever going to Florida!!! 0 degrees doesnt bother me much, but when it hits 90 degrees im dying unless the AC is cranked on max
 
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Same with southern Maine. For years we thought it was funny to sell bits and pieces of the coast -- Maine has far more coastline than any other American state -- to overpaying Massholes and Connecticunts. But after eight decades of it, they now have almost five percent of the coast and no civilized Mainer can stand eastern York or Cumberland Counties. Thank God they haven't determined to drive further northeast, yet. Might deplete the shotshell horde. Scariest part is they want to turn a working forest and the biggest dumpsite in North America's three centuried history into some misbegotten national park. Up theirs!
 
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