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Moderator & Gaseous Substance Inspector
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As Tuco reported some British WWII Comet tanks were sold in an auction here in Finland.

Their equipment were sold earlier, like periscopes and gunner´s sighting telescopes.

I bought one of these sights a couple of years ago. It is a nice piece of art. Here is come pictures from it.







 

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Also an item that I wanted to put in my suitcase....

I think in the sold tanks two had sights - one was a Comet. I might be wrong but that is how I remember it.
 

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Moderator & Gaseous Substance Inspector
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Also an item that I wanted to put in my suitcase....

I think in the sold tanks two had sights - one was a Comet. I might be wrong but that is how I remember it.
I didn´t catch that : (

Actually there were two of these telescopes in one tank: One for gunner in the turret and one for machine gunner in the hull.
 

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Super Moderator Platinum Member Zombie Killer
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Brent, I think I can answer that for you as long as my source is correct and I don't mean to hijack the question since it was directed to Lemmy..and Lemmy can chime in, too. The 17 pounder (76mm) could penetrate 109mm of armor out to 914 meters using AP rounds. The APDS round could penetrate 161mm of armor out to 1828 meters. The APDS round had nearly 50% more muzzle velocity at 1204m/s than the AP round.
The later 77mm gun used on the Comet, according to Peter Gudgin: Armoured Firepower, was the same caliber as the 17 pounder but called the 77mm to avoid confusion between the two guns since different cartridge cases were used for the Comet. The 17pounder is the 76mm/L55 and the 77 is 76/L49. The ranges were similar, yet due to the lower velocity of the 77mm, the penetration was different out to distances was less.
The book also said that there was a considerable variation in the weight of the APDS rounds, so the ranges are general.

Hope this tells you what you need...in a round-about way...

The Comet and the rest of the Cruiser tanks are some of my favorites and I was reading up on the Comet just the other day since I had gotten a model of one to build when I get the motivation.
 

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Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
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Brent, I think I can answer that for you as long as my source is correct and I don't mean to hijack the question since it was directed to Lemmy..and Lemmy can chime in, too. The 17 pounder (76mm) could penetrate 109mm of armor out to 914 meters using AP rounds. The APDS round could penetrate 161mm of armor out to 1828 meters. The APDS round had nearly 50% more muzzle velocity at 1204m/s than the AP round.
The later 77mm gun used on the Comet, according to Peter Gudgin: Armoured Firepower, was the same caliber as the 17 pounder but called the 77mm to avoid confusion between the two guns since different cartridge cases were used for the Comet. The 17pounder is the 76mm/L55 and the 77 is 76/L49. The ranges were similar, yet due to the lower velocity of the 77mm, the penetration was different out to distances was less.
The book also said that there was a considerable variation in the weight of the APDS rounds, so the ranges are general.

Hope this tells you what you need...in a round-about way...

The Comet and the rest of the Cruiser tanks are some of my favorites and I was reading up on the Comet just the other day since I had gotten a model of one to build when I get the motivation.

What scale, Ol Duke? I have this idea that a string of O-gauge (1:48) flat cars, each with a tank (Comet, Crusader, Sherman, Panther, Mark III, Mark IV, etc) on it would make a neat thing stretching across a shelf.
 

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Super Moderator Platinum Member Zombie Killer
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I'd love to have a 1:1 scale to play with as long as it was already in running shape like the guy that bought the ex-British Challenger and drove it in downtown Knoxville straight off the railhead. Since I can't do that, I'll stick with 1/35th scale. Clyde, looks like 1/48th scale is getting a lot of attention by the model industry. I guess they feel that there needs to be some economy of scale to help with making dioramas, etc. In the past, only 1/35 and 1/72 were the preferred scales of armor, but 1/48th is getting a lot of new products on the market. If my eyes get any worse, I'll have work on 1/6th scale to be able see them....:)
 
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