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Hey Dale2008, I just took one of the newlines apart, and got to the trigger part of assembly. It looks like you might have to remove other parts from the frame to easily put the trigger back in. The issue is the trigger spring, as it is pretty strong and does not let the screw holes stay lined up. The model I'm talking about is the second model with the cylinder stop bolt coming from the breech face.

Once you remove the mainspring, the hand spring and hand, the hammer will slide out the top of the frame. At this point you should have enough space to put the trigger back in. First reinstall the cylinder bolt in the frame. It just slides in the hole on the right side of the frame. Push the bolt into the breech opening. Than, insert the trigger with spring through the bottom of the frame. The trigger spring will rest on the cylinder bolt. Get your trigger screw ready to install back in place. Now use a non marring tool (I used the rubber coated handle of pliers) to push the trigger assembly towards the front of the frame, to line up with the screw hole. It helps if the revolver is held securely while doing this step. Keep pressure applied to the trigger, and holes lined up, while screwing in the trigger screw, to avoid damaging the threads. Make sure you've got your frame secured, so that it doesn't slip away while applying pressure to the trigger pieces.
 

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So I just got one, a second model. It's extremely clean. I took apart to give it a good cleaning and try to fix an issue with binding in the timing. It looked like the bolt edge was hitting the case heads (I had spent casing loaded to dry fire it).

It still seams to bind so my question is what do the hands on these guins look like? Is there a "top" and "bottom" hand like a Colt SAA, two steps or levels? Mine has two but I have seen a sketch where it appears to just have one level.
 

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Binding of the bolt on the notches when cocking the hammer plagues the New Lines. The cylinder shouldn't move until the bolt has retracted back in the frame. Check the wide back side of the bolt (fig 6. part n on patent drawing from Berkley) and the bolt engaging protrusion (fig 8. part m, D is the hammer) on the hammer for wear. If these are missing some metal, the bolt lags and doesn't retract before the cylinder starts spinning. A replacement bolt could do the trick but a worn hammer piece might need a weld to build it back up. On my pieces it is the cylinder bolt stop that is always worn. The hammer was probably hardened more than the other piece.. Once the bolt stop's edges get rounded off, the hammer protrusion glides over it; bolt never retracts and the cylinder tries to spin with the bolt engaged. If the piece is almost worn out, it seems like the cylinder gets 'sprung' into rotation instead of following speed of the cocking motion, because of the tension built up on the bolt. When it releases late, the hand has already started pushing the cylinder, and it seems to try to catch up while ruining the notches on cylinder, stripping and stressing the bolt piece. I can't find a good source of these bolt stops and numrich only has the small frame part.

Looks like the bottom of the hand only rides the frame orfice, and the top pushes the cylinder.

Do you have any pictures of your new acquisition?
 

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Here's some pics. I also have the issue of the bolt pickup being late, but my main issues were the bolt outer edge hitting cases which I fixed, but I also noticed the top hand contacts the cases as well making the final indexing and cocking difficult when cases are loaded.



 

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That gun looks sharp! Nice blue on the barrel! Looks like Brit proofs on the cyl and barrel. Thanks for sharing a picture!
How did you fix the bolt/case clearance problem?
If you find a good source of parts, please let us know. That spring is not very fancy, a gunsmith should be able to make one out of spring steel.
 

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I noticed the top edge of the second step on the bolt was contacting case heads so I simply filed the upper corner off. It was hitting hard enough to make small marks on the cases edges. I also recut the hand back so it doesn't stick out the hand slot into the frame so far. In doing this the hand now turns the cylinder a little later so there is no more bolt hangup. The hand now doesn't contact case heads either. Much smoother. There is still a little hook on the sear ledge that makes trigger pull quite hard, I'll need to look at that.

As for the mainspring I sketched it out and took measurements. We work with alot of steel at my work including what I believe are a few forms of spring steel. I'll ask this week, I have also read up on tempering steel at home. If I can make one I'll make a couple so I have extras, and maybe even some to sell if it's easy enough. I am also getting one in nickel I'll post photos of.

 

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I ended up getting some spring steel from my work. It's dimensions are a slightly different at 0.311" wide x 0.043" thick while the original measures 0.240" wide x 0.057" thick.

I bent up the new one and tapered the end where it fits into the frame, like the original. I tried the action and it works quite well, I was figuring I would need to put a stiffer temper in the spring as the original is quite hard and yielded a heavy SA cock and trigger pull. I'm not sure if this spring is too light and will fail to ignite primers though.





Note how it has to go around the screw lug, hence the funny shape.

 

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I Have the the New Line in .22 cal in vg shape, but I can't remove the cylinder, I SD 40 it a number of times. I pushed the button al the way in & also removed the screw under the cylinder rod, still no luck. Any suggestions ?

Thanks
Paul
 

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I don't own any .22's, but whatever you do don't use pliers to pull out the pin. If you have to, use layered shop cloths or rubber to grip the pin with some vise grips, after you've secured the revolver in soft jaw vice (use two pieces of wood in your vice and take grips off). The smallest frame I have is a 30rf, and on this model the cylinder pin can be accessed through the hammer opening in the frame (back of frame). You can remove the hammer (take out main spring first) and try to knock the pin out with a brass punch. See Berkley's post from 03-30-2010 and look at upper right diagram. You will see how the end of the pin is visible just in front of the hammer. Mind you, if the pin detent is holding the pin, you run the risk of damaging that, so try to remove the button or press it in using a plastic spring clamp or a c clamp with rubber jaws before drifting pin through the back. I was able to remove the detent button with the cylinder pin in place. The button has one straight cut and one on an angle. The angle cut goes to the top.

Good Luck!
 

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I usually resist responding to old threads but this one was very helpful to me as I just aquired a New Line 32 with a broken hand spring . Thank you for the great photos and descriptions !
 

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Guys i just came across this post. I am having an issue. I opened my Colt up and noticed there is no handspring. Also when I took the trigger out there's no trigger spring. Can someone show me a picture of their trigger spring? Or does this model not have a trigger spring and functions only with the hand spring and the main spring?
 
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