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Swift, it's a nice little .22 new line you've got there. It seems to be missing a hand spring (as previously noted). I've got a .41 new line here, with a complete inner mechanism. Here's a picture of the part you need.
I think all the new lines have similar parts, they just might be a little smaller on a .22. You should be able to make your own from some blued spring steel. Once you've made a desired crescent shape, just use your pliers to make 'ears' at the ends of the piece, and you're done! The spring on this revolver gauges at .025" or .06mm thick. The one on the table is a replacement from numrich (little crusted, she is), they sent one for me to Canada! Good luck!!

buckyjr
 

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new line cylinder stop bolt



Here's a few more pictures I took of another replacement 'cylinder stop bolt' for the new line revolver. Like I said before, this is for the .41 and the dimensions for smaller revolvers will probably be different. I know that .38's and .41's shared the same frame, therefore same parts. If you wanted to make this part, I can provide further measurements.

buckyjr
 

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Yes, the part came from Numrich. They just reconfigured their website, and it doesn't specify which size the part you're ordering is. Might be a good idea to call them. It seems the 38 and 41 have a larger piece, and the 32, 30 and 22 share the smaller size.
 

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The part was intended for a .41 new police revolver, but I haven't got around to installing it. Last time I had a look, it seemed this part was a little small for it. Perhaps it is for the smaller frame. I want to buy a few more from Numrich, it would be nice if they listed this stuff by calibre... When I ordered 2 hand springs, they were both different in width, but they both fit in the 41 frame. It looks like a rainy day tomorrow, I will check..
 

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Hey Dale2008, which model are you working on? You should be able just to put the trigger back in by sliding it in the frame and bolting up the trigger screw. I've only taken it out when all the other components were out of the frame. Whatever you do don't force anything, and move the hammer back a little to help engage the sear. Hope this helps.
 

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Hey Dale2008, I just took one of the newlines apart, and got to the trigger part of assembly. It looks like you might have to remove other parts from the frame to easily put the trigger back in. The issue is the trigger spring, as it is pretty strong and does not let the screw holes stay lined up. The model I'm talking about is the second model with the cylinder stop bolt coming from the breech face.

Once you remove the mainspring, the hand spring and hand, the hammer will slide out the top of the frame. At this point you should have enough space to put the trigger back in. First reinstall the cylinder bolt in the frame. It just slides in the hole on the right side of the frame. Push the bolt into the breech opening. Than, insert the trigger with spring through the bottom of the frame. The trigger spring will rest on the cylinder bolt. Get your trigger screw ready to install back in place. Now use a non marring tool (I used the rubber coated handle of pliers) to push the trigger assembly towards the front of the frame, to line up with the screw hole. It helps if the revolver is held securely while doing this step. Keep pressure applied to the trigger, and holes lined up, while screwing in the trigger screw, to avoid damaging the threads. Make sure you've got your frame secured, so that it doesn't slip away while applying pressure to the trigger pieces.
 

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Binding of the bolt on the notches when cocking the hammer plagues the New Lines. The cylinder shouldn't move until the bolt has retracted back in the frame. Check the wide back side of the bolt (fig 6. part n on patent drawing from Berkley) and the bolt engaging protrusion (fig 8. part m, D is the hammer) on the hammer for wear. If these are missing some metal, the bolt lags and doesn't retract before the cylinder starts spinning. A replacement bolt could do the trick but a worn hammer piece might need a weld to build it back up. On my pieces it is the cylinder bolt stop that is always worn. The hammer was probably hardened more than the other piece.. Once the bolt stop's edges get rounded off, the hammer protrusion glides over it; bolt never retracts and the cylinder tries to spin with the bolt engaged. If the piece is almost worn out, it seems like the cylinder gets 'sprung' into rotation instead of following speed of the cocking motion, because of the tension built up on the bolt. When it releases late, the hand has already started pushing the cylinder, and it seems to try to catch up while ruining the notches on cylinder, stripping and stressing the bolt piece. I can't find a good source of these bolt stops and numrich only has the small frame part.

Looks like the bottom of the hand only rides the frame orfice, and the top pushes the cylinder.

Do you have any pictures of your new acquisition?
 

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That gun looks sharp! Nice blue on the barrel! Looks like Brit proofs on the cyl and barrel. Thanks for sharing a picture!
How did you fix the bolt/case clearance problem?
If you find a good source of parts, please let us know. That spring is not very fancy, a gunsmith should be able to make one out of spring steel.
 

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I don't own any .22's, but whatever you do don't use pliers to pull out the pin. If you have to, use layered shop cloths or rubber to grip the pin with some vise grips, after you've secured the revolver in soft jaw vice (use two pieces of wood in your vice and take grips off). The smallest frame I have is a 30rf, and on this model the cylinder pin can be accessed through the hammer opening in the frame (back of frame). You can remove the hammer (take out main spring first) and try to knock the pin out with a brass punch. See Berkley's post from 03-30-2010 and look at upper right diagram. You will see how the end of the pin is visible just in front of the hammer. Mind you, if the pin detent is holding the pin, you run the risk of damaging that, so try to remove the button or press it in using a plastic spring clamp or a c clamp with rubber jaws before drifting pin through the back. I was able to remove the detent button with the cylinder pin in place. The button has one straight cut and one on an angle. The angle cut goes to the top.

Good Luck!
 
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