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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just picked this up off the trader here for $500. Was mainly looking for a cheap 1911 shooter and I thought what I was getting was one of the Argentine manufactured ones. Turned out to be a Colt manufactured one and from what I can find I believe made in 1933. Don't really know a whole lot about the various Colts purchased by and manufactured by Argentina. As you can see there is basically zero finish left. everything is tight and smooth. came with a 42 dated mag pouch and 3 mags. I haven't decided yet what I'm going to do with it. Right now its between just leave it as is and shoot it or take it all apart clean it and rust blue it. I generally frown on refinishing guns but this this one is a bit rough and I'm pretty sure that refinishing it isn't going to drop its value below what I paid for it. (not that I plan on selling it) Before I do anything I'm going to see how it shoots first. I think I remember seeing somewhere that Argentina bought around 5300 of these in 1933.

I'm certainly not a colt guy, everything I collect is German manufactured so this was more of an impulse buy to get a cheap 1911 shooter.

What can you tell me about it?



EDIT: Just discovered the slide to also be matching.
 

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One observation, the pistol was made in the early 30s, at that time the police in Argentina was called -Policia de la Capital-, the new name -Policia Federal- was adopted in mid 40s, I wonder why did they stamp the new name after having the pistol in its inventory for at least ten years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
One observation, the pistol was made in the early 30s, at that time the police in Argentina was called -Policia de la Capital-, the new name -Policia Federal- was adopted in mid 40s, I wonder why did they stamp the new name after having the pistol in its inventory for at least ten years.
I remember reading that somewhere. Would these all have been previously marked "Policia de la Capital" or only some marked like that? This one doesnt seem to have had any markings ground off other than the crest.

Also when Sarco imported them here they stated that they replaced all the springs and installed replacement plastic grips. What type of grips would these have had new in the 1930s?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here's an old article on these pistols, as well as some of their Argentine sisters. There is some good info in here, but note that this is not a current web page and the guns are no longer available from the importer. Sadly, the prices are a little stale, too!! :)

http://www.cruffler.com/review-june-00.html
That was really interesting, thanks for sharing that. I bookmarked it for future reference.
 

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The total number of Colt pistols that were purchased by the Policia de la Capital, later named Policia Federal Argentina is 8963. This information appears on an official document so this data seems to be reliable. These pistols were off-the-shelf commercial pistols which were supplied by Colt fitted with checkered walnut grip panels. In reference to the question raised by Raul in regard why the marking POLICIA FEDERAL was applied to these pistols, it seems that sometime in the late 1940's or 1950's the Policia Federal wanted to standardize the markings applied to their service pistols. The Ballester-Molina and Sistema Colt were marked with the Argentinean Coat of Arms and the legend POLICIA FEDERAL, so these markings were also applied to the Colt made pistols. The Argentinean Crest applied to the Colt made pistols has the same design as the one used by HAFDASA to mark the Ballester-Molina pistols, therefore unless HAFDASA provided police armourers with this stamp, it seems likely that these markings were applied by HAFDASA. The Argentinean Federal Police withdrew the caliber .45 pistols from service in the early 1970's when they were replaced by the Browning Hi Power. The caliber .45 pistols were transfered to provincial police departments where they remained in service until fairly recently.
 

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FYI, there is a great book out there if you can find it by Alex Gherovici title Military Pistols of Argentina. It was self published in 1994 and has over a hundred pages on the subject, Also has head stamps and holsters. As I said they are hard to find. Be nice is someone could arrange a reprint.
 
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