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Discussion Starter #1
I just picked up a 1953 model 70. It is in pretty good shape. It is a shooter not collectable but needs to be cleaned up. I am just looking for suggestions on cleaning products to use. I got some advice from iwanna who recently cleaned one up. i was thinking of using CLP or Brownells rust preventative #2 and a soft brush for the metal and murphys oil soap then scotts liquid gold for the stock. Any other suggestions? hints? etc.
Thanks
Kurt
 

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I have to disagree with your statement "this isnt collectors grade". Just about all good Winchesters are collectable, even if altered. The recoil pad is a shame but not a horrible problem. A good solid red Winchester pad to replace the ventalated pad would be nice. Refinishing is the worst thing that can be done to either the wood or metal. I have worked on and cleaned antique guns and knives for 4 decades now and find that either 3 or 4 aught steel wool soaked in a good oil works good on metal, while a mild soap and tooth brush works well on wood.
 

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I have to disagree with your statement "this isnt collectors grade". Just about all good Winchesters are collectable, even if altered. The recoil pad is a shame but not a horrible problem. A good solid red Winchester pad to replace the ventalated pad would be nice. Refinishing is the worst thing that can be done to either the wood or metal. I have worked on and cleaned antique guns and knives for 4 decades now and find that either 3 or 4 aught steel wool soaked in a good oil works good on metal, while a mild soap and tooth brush works well on wood.
Agree with the suggestion from 'remchester - except I prefer bronze wool to steel wool. Suggest Murphy's Oil Soap for cleaning the stock. DAMP (not wet) cloth dipped in soap solution and wrung out and then clean things up. Toothbrush, soft one, does well for crvices, checkering, etc..
 

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Me? No. I wasn't aware there was anything that will "protect" the wood. I do suggest you slather on some Scott's Liquid Gold and let it sit for a bit before buffing. Works well.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I was thinking some type of wax or oil. I am not sure what type of finish winchester put on its pre 64 guns.
 

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NIce Featherweight!

A nice Featherweight WInchester! Unfortunately, I cannot offer the precise advice you seek concerning stock preservation, but based on the general commentary of the Thread, I offer the following observations.

As in most collectible guns, there is a gradient. As a general rule for all pre 64 Models 70, collectability factors include sub-model (i.e.: Supergrade, target, carbine, featherweight, etc.), chambering, era - prewar, transitional, postwar (as yours), configuration, stock style and sighting equipment. Then follow the general factors of originality and condition. The listing here is illustrative rather than exhaustive. All these elements factor into collectability. Yet the Model 70 also possesses another attribute which I tend to consider as complimentary to collectability and commonly overshadowing it. That is desirability from a practical utility standpoint. While you have omitted some descriptors such as chambering, as you note, your rifle likely falls better into the practical utility category. The design, workmanship and materials have earned it considerable respect amongst collectors, hunters and shooters. The aftermarket pad your rifle wears is perhaps the most common modification of these rifles to be encountered. Depending on chambering, is often a de facto ergonomic improvement; this especially so in Featherweights which tend toward greater recoil product than the heavier standard model. The main concern when buying the average 70 in such aftermarket configuration is that the length of pull has not been seriously disturbed. A shooter of smaller stature might appreciate a shorter length, but the rifle is less marketable (depreciated in value) if the pull is materially shortened. Just from the photo, your rifle appears to retain approximately correct length. If your rifle pad is still supple, I would leave it alone unless you plan a stock refinish. In contrast, if (typically) hardened, replacing it will have the dual effect of adding to the rifle value and utility. I would only consider installing a red Winchester pad in conjunction with a stock refinish. Otherwise, perhaps better to select a pad which is darker and presents less contrast between ‘old and new’. A final note concerning a condition is the vulnerability of the Featherweight alloy bottom metal to marring which many exhibit and which may require extra caution to protect in field use.
Should your rifle be in the common chamberings, I would suggest exactly your plan of cleaning up and using it. If not or in anything other than the common example it appears to be, you might wish to research its value and make an informed plan accordingly. I expect that absent some negative surprise concerning condition, you have a quality rifle. I have accumulated several each, common Models 70 and 54 wearing hardened aftermarket pads. Only a ‘buy and stash’ mobile lifestyle has prevented the fix I describe here.
Enjoy that nice rifle!
My take.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It is a 308 featherweight. LOP is 13.75 which I think is factory. I was planning on putting a pachymar decelorator pad on.
 

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After the wood is cleaned with murphy's oil soap do you put anything on to protect the wood?
Depends on the original finish. If oil, I rub in a very light coat of BLO or a tung oil and then buff with a clean, dry, soft cloth. If varnish, a high carnauba wax.
 

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I believe the 308 and spinoff cartridges were/are especially good matches for the Featherweight model. As to the length of pull, the original length is listed at 13 1/2. Manufactured in 1953, your rifle was in the second year of production for the Featherweight model.
 
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