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Hi,

I may buy some Yugo surplus ammo on clips. I have not used corrosive ammo in my SKS before, I have in my Mosin Nagants though. Cleaning the barrel and bolt and everything on that end is easy enough. But for the gas system, which I am assuming I would need to do, Is that just a complete disassembly and wipe down or is there some trick to it?

Thanks!
 

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Diamond Bullet Member
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Get some paper towels(or a small sponge) and soak it with windex or even hot soapy water, run it through the gas tube and then run a dry paper towel or cloth to remove whatever is left.
Then put a LIGHT amount of oil on a small patch and coat the inside of the tube.

Most people dont bother cleaning the gas tube, I do. I treat my AKs like beauty queens.
 

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The best thing and EASIEST thing you could do immediately after shooting corrosive ammo... is to pop off a couple rounds of Non corrosive. This will burn off and remove the salts left behind by the corrosive crap. I've done this for over a year now... no issues. I found this info online... just look around it is true. Then when you get home.... Clean her up the right way as NCReptile points out.
 

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The best thing and EASIEST thing you could do immediately after shooting corrosive ammo... is to pop off a couple rounds of Non corrosive. This will burn off and remove the salts left behind by the corrosive crap. I've done this for over a year now... no issues. I found this info online... just look around it is true. Then when you get home.... Clean her up the right way as NCReptile points out.
+1
I do this with my Mosin's and my Tantal.
Fire off about 5 rounds and clean as normal; I usually run a soaked patch of Hoppes thru, dry patches after, then fill the bore with WipeOut. After that sits for a bit I push that out and then finish up with some break-free. Sparkeling clean after this method; if you dont have much copper foul then you can skip the WipeOut part.
 

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Get some paper towels(or a small sponge) and soak it with windex or even hot soapy water, run it through the gas tube and then run a dry paper towel or cloth to remove whatever is left.
Then put a LIGHT amount of oil on a small patch and coat the inside of the tube.

Most people dont bother cleaning the gas tube, I do. I treat my AKs like beauty queens.
I agree with necreptile, but i would add that you should remove and clean the gas valve if you have a 59/66. run a wet pipe cleaner through the gas duct into the barrel. Also i would not recommend any oil inside the gas tube.
 

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I agree with necreptile, but i would add that you should remove and clean the gas valve if you have a 59/66. run a wet pipe cleaner through the gas duct into the barrel. Also i would not recommend any oil inside the gas tube.
the oil in the gastube is different from person to person. Alot of people say it can cause gunkbuildup or stain your gas piston. I have never had that problem and I have been cleaning for a while again.

Im the kind of person who goes nuts if I find any rust, so I put the oil. Light is the keyword though.

In all honesty the windex or soapy water with a sponge will get all the salts out. Oil is for crazy clean nuts like meself.
 

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I have never used water in any firearm. Too afread of rust. I can't imagine cleaning a barrel or steal with warm water. I just use windex. And I have always oiled my gas pistons, don't buy that its harmful to them. No stains on any of mine yet......Without a coating of oil, steal eventually will start ti rust. Especially after you have doused it in water......
 
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water hurts nothing if it is dried immediatly and not left to sit .I light oil coat everything and always clean and lightly oil the gastube .It never stained anything just as NCreptile says . Its very good advice . If any of you shoot Bulgarian WASP 5.45 ,you can attest it is the filthiest ammo ever conceived .It litterly cakes on in a thick hard carbon under the flashhider around the muzzle ,and interior of the gas tube . Very difficult to remove .I make sure I oil these spots .
 
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I like Dennis' approach to this topic:

http://64.82.96.51/clean.htm

He says this is the way he cleans the bores in all the guns he sells at Empire Arms.
Good advice .Windex is effectivly an ammonia based cleaner that is readily available to almost everyone and is multipurpose . Any amonia will neutralise corrosive salts .Even GI bore cleaner from WW2( that old milky white stuff) has ammonia in it as the major corrosive removing component.
 

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i would like to see some proof that ammonia neutralizes salts.

all you need is water to rinse the salt away. it seems like this has been covered a zillion times on the net but some people still keep saying using ammonia. for the purposes of cleaning a barrel ammonia is nothing more than very expensive water.

water is all you need to wash away the salts. all of these fancy formulas and techniques are just so much hooey.
 

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I have never used water in any firearm. Too afread of rust. I can't imagine cleaning a barrel or steal with warm water. I just use windex. And I have always oiled my gas pistons, don't buy that its harmful to them. No stains on any of mine yet......Without a coating of oil, steal eventually will start ti rust. Especially after you have doused it in water......
you can spray your gun with wd40 and the water will be magically gone. water is only bad if left to dry on its own.
 

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windex

My technique is not that much different than the Empire Arms method. I live quite close the the range so I generally don't do it until I get home...


I run 2-3 patches soaked with 'Windex" or other ammoniated window cleaner through the bore and use a patch dampened with same to wipe off the bolt favce, inside of the gas tube, (if so equipped), ETC.

(In gas operated semi or full auto rifle, I'll squirt some Windex down the gas tube, (or system) and let it drain out the bore, then run a long pipe cleaner through the gas tube or sysem to dry).

I'm fond of foaming Bore cleaners, so I'll follow this up with a shot of Gunslick foaming bore cleaner. I let it sit about 30 min, then run a clean patch through. I'll generally follow that with a patch with a few drops of Breakfree CLP on it to protect the bore and loosen any other fouling up... Before I shoot the weapon again, I'll run a dry patch through to clean out any excess CLP.

(If using foaming bore cleaner in a gas system Semi auto, make sure you run a long pipe cleaner through it to absorb excess bore cleaner)

If you're in a hurry... Just run a dry patch through after the windex then a few patches of CLP through... Works Too. ( I Imagine Ed's Red or Kroil would work just as well)


I agree with Empire----- I'm not going to run 50 patches through a rifle to get a clean patch!!! It's near impossible to get a "clean" one out of some rifles.

In Extreme cases, I use an Outers Foul out II, (Electronic bore cleaner), that WILL clean the lions share of crud out if nothing else will!

Truly, this is fast and no where near as complicated as it sounds. I generally take 6-8 rifles to shoot at the range when I go. I clean them "assembly line style" ; by the time I foam the bore in the last one, the first one is ready to dry patch and lube!........
 
G

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i would like to see some proof that ammonia neutralizes salts.

all you need is water to rinse the salt away. it seems like this has been covered a zillion times on the net but some people still keep saying using ammonia. for the purposes of cleaning a barrel ammonia is nothing more than very expensive water.

water is all you need to wash away the salts. all of these fancy formulas and techniques are just so much hooey.
I can pull up scientific and chemical analisis all day if you wish ,heres a good start of amine ( ammonia) based neutralizers used in corrosive neutralisation proseses in industrial chemical plants on a larger scale than our simple gunbores. Not Hooey .Soapy water ,or just plain water works as a diluting process ,but for more stubborn components it doesnt . Such as the heavy carbon fouling from 5.45 surplus ammo .
http://www.freepatentsonline.com/5965785.html
 

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I can pull up scientific and chemical analisis all day if you wish ,heres a good start of amine ( ammonia) based neutralizers used in corrosive neutralisation proseses in industrial chemical plants on a larger scale than our simple gunbores. Not Hooey .Soapy water ,or just plain water works as a diluting process ,but for more stubborn components it doesnt . Such as the heavy carbon fouling from 5.45 surplus ammo .
http://www.freepatentsonline.com/5965785.html
sorry but that's not telling me anything. ammonia based doesn't specify if ammonia is the actual neutralizing agent or not. just that it is in there. i just did a very small, quick search and didn't see anything on the net.

if ammonia does neutralize salt then salt that has been awash in ammonia should be safe to put in your bore, right?

if anyone can show where it states that salt can be neutralized by ammonia i would like to see it. i mean from someone that knows their stuff, not just a dude cleaning his guns.

and yes, i realize that water just washes away the salt. soapy or warm water may be better then just plain water. can't say for sure.
 
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sorry but that's not telling me anything. ammonia based doesn't specify if ammonia is the actual neutralizing agent or not. just that it is in there. i just did a very small, quick search and didn't see anything on the net.

if ammonia does neutralize salt then salt that has been awash in ammonia should be safe to put in your bore, right?

if anyone can show where it states that salt can be neutralized by ammonia i would like to see it. i mean from someone that knows their stuff, not just a dude cleaning his guns.

and yes, i realize that water just washes away the salt. soapy or warm water may be better then just plain water. can't say for sure.
Believe what you wish .Ammonia is not added to corrosive salt removers just cause it smells good . If your method works for you .Then thats all that counts . But I would still sugest to members that are asking ,that ammonian based cleaners work . And scorrrosive salt neutralisers in military bore cleaners ( GI ,german and others) and industrial process neutralisers contain it as well As proven in the products I have a link to .I am no chemist ,but the common link between every one is ammonia.

http://www.wipo.int/pctdb/en/wo.jsp?IA=WO2005026295&DISPLAY=DESC - Ammonium base chemical corrosion neutraliser

http://www.wipo.int/pctdb/en/wo.jsp?IA=WO2005026295&DISPLAY=DESC - chemical annalisis of a cleaner to replace ammonium method in an Iranian crude oil plant

Ammines is the corrosive component . Its root word is actualy based on ammonia ,trhe compound used to fight it .
 

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corrosive salts

It's the water..period...as far as corrosive salts go...corrosive something else in some industrial plant then perhaps ammonia...These are not salts: "No matter what type of petroleum feedstock is used as the charge, the distillation equipment is subjected to the corrosive activity of acids such as H2S, HCI, organic acids, and H2CO3. The problem of corrosion caused by these acid gases as water condenses in the overhead condensing systems of distillation columns is well known. The consequent presence of acidic water leads to the undesirable corrosion of metallic equipment, often rapidly. "

Windex contains...water.

Ammonia is added to gun bore cleaners to remove....copper. Ammonia may remove some coppered fouling to get to some more salt in the metal's pores which is removed by ...water.

Ammonia gets mixed with .....water.

With regards to corrosive ammo in a gas gun. Shoot enough to make the cleaning worthwhile, ie. the disassembly for cleaning worthwhile. I usually soak the metal in a sink of soap/water, displace the water with WD40, and then apply 120psi of compressed air to remove the WD-40.
 
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