Gunboards Forums banner

1 - 20 of 53 Posts

·
Silver Bullet member
Joined
·
48,524 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
block tyson product imports after break out..for fear blood born viruses on meats?
how i felt It was possible before this..
.as in the know meat shop cleanness trained.....not for this though?
 

·
Silver Bullet member
Joined
·
48,524 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Nothing is what it seams.?
.in any event....
never... every card shown In the deck..
..nor misdeal reviled!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,690 Posts
4 abattoirs in Queensland, Oz have been proscribed by China, but others are still supplying meat to that market.
 

·
Platinum Bullet Member
Joined
·
47,742 Posts
Politics,

the local Chinese eat everything ,

protein is protein,

to block imports of any company is political,


think about it,

do the politicians in China care about their own population?
 

·
Diamond Member
Joined
·
13,057 Posts
IMHO anybody who is comparing China to the US is doing exactly what China wants.. making it look like China is comparable to the US
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
847 Posts
More likely China flexing it's muscles. They are doing a fair bit of it of late.
Who cares, they already paid for it. If they want to throw it out....it is theirs to throw out.
 

·
Diamond Member
Joined
·
13,057 Posts
gezzee do you have any idea how import export works ??? you might want to study up on things
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
847 Posts
gezzee do you have any idea how import export works ??? you might want to study up on things
IIRC, Poltry is a part of the agricultural products the Chinese Government agreed to purchase in the trade deal President Trump negotiated. While you are correct that normal imports do not mean an outright purchase that has nothing to do with pre-arranged purchases. Much of Europe does the same thing within their own economy. Ask a German about the milk and butter mountain, LOL.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butter_mountain

Like the European Market government interventionism, As I understand it, the Chinese Communist Government would not agree to straight imports but would agree to set purchases which they can control much easier.

If China continues to suspend shipments based on coronavirus cases reported at processing plants, it could also threaten to undermine promised agricultural purchases as part of the Washington-Beijing trade deal.


US poultry shipments to China boosted
Read more at: https://www.bloombergquint.com/china/tyson-pepsi-among-companies-hit-by-fallout-of-beijing-outbreak
Copyright © BloombergQuint
China had pledged to increase purchases of American agricultural goods as part of an initial trade deal signed in January, and Tyson Foods said it had seen chicken shipments rise as a result.
https://www.poultryworld.net/Meat/Articles/2020/3/US-poultry-shipments-to-China-boosted-555623E/
 

·
Diamond Member
Joined
·
13,057 Posts
and we are closing meat processing plants and deporting immigrants working a poultry abattoirs, facing, if not an outright meat shortage, at least higher prices for Americans. What a deal
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,173 Posts
We've had our own mountains of butter and cheese, milk lakes etc. The .gov shouldn't intervene and use the public's money to give away to farmers, oil companies or anyone else.
 

·
Diamond Member
Joined
·
13,057 Posts
We've had our own mountains of butter and cheese, milk lakes etc. The .gov shouldn't intervene and use the public's money to give away to farmers, oil companies or anyone else.
Estaban sorry charlie ain't so http://www.fourwinds10.com/siterun_data/health/food/news.php?q=1212803067

https://abcnews.go.com/Business/story?id=4770135&page=1

in fact the way it works now is we use or sell all of our grain from harvest to about 7or 9 months out and buy fresh grain from the southern hemisphere. the only grain reserve we have and that the government has no control over is whatever individual farmers held back hoping for better prices later in the year/ early the next year. THERE IS NO USA FOOD RESERVE, and there hasn't been for decades


here is the 2014 inventory https://www.fsa.usda.gov/Internet/FSA_File/wid2a.pdf

I picked it because I like round numbers 0000000000000

10.1 million bushels of wheat in the reserve , that translates to 400 million loaf of bread for 320 million people that need 3 meals a day and if you notice the bread won't be used to make cheese sandwiches 00000000

PS: a standard loaf of bread is 1.25 pounds of wheat yielding about 1500- 1600 calories

in other words one loaf to feed 8 people average 26-30 slices per loaf .. maybe 1 slice of bread per meal for 10 days ( approx 200 calories a day/ or 1 day of 2000 calories) and then we are out of wheat from our "reserve"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,173 Posts
Estaban sorry charlie ain't so http://www.fourwinds10.com/siterun_data/health/food/news.php?q=1212803067

https://abcnews.go.com/Business/story?id=4770135&page=1

in fact the way it works now is we use or sell all of our grain from harvest to about 7or 9 months out and buy fresh grain from the southern hemisphere. the only grain reserve we have and that the government has no control over is whatever individual farmers held back hoping for better prices later in the year/ early the next year. THERE IS NO USA FOOD RESERVE, and there hasn't been for decades


here is the 2014 inventory https://www.fsa.usda.gov/Internet/FSA_File/wid2a.pdf

I picked it because I like round numbers 0000000000000

10.1 million bushels of wheat in the reserve , that translates to 400 million loaf of bread for 320 million people that need 3 meals a day and if you notice the bread won't be used to make cheese sandwiches 00000000

PS: a standard loaf of bread is 1.25 pounds of wheat yielding about 1500- 1600 calories

in other words one loaf to feed 8 people average 26-30 slices per loaf .. maybe 1 slice of bread per meal for 10 days ( approx 200 calories a day/ or 1 day of 2000 calories) and then we are out of wheat from our "reserve"
OK if you say so. 1.4 Billion Pounds of Cheese to go with those sammiches. And uh, those links and data are seriously old. Like 2008 and 2014!
https://psmag.com/economics/what-will-the-us-government-do-with-1-4-billion-pounds-of-cheese

GOVERNMENT CHEESE

Over the years, the government has gravitated toward one method of unloading dairy surplus: giving it to the poor.
In 1949, the Agricultural Act first gave the Commodity Credit Corporation, a government-owned agency created to stabilize farm incomes, authority to purchase dairy products. The corporation's stockpile grew over the years—amassing 500 million pounds worth $4 billion across 35 warehouses—and so did public outrage. "Probably the cheapest and most practical thing would be to dump it in the ocean," a USDA official told the told the Washington Post in 1981.
To clear out the CCC's surplus under the Reagan administration, the USDA created the Temporary Emergency Food Assistance Program, which "helps supplement the diets of low-income Americans." At the time, that help took the form of "government cheese," which was distributed to poor seniors en masse. According to History, the five-pound blocks of cheese were neon orange and sometimes moldy, with a taste like Velveeta.
Today, the government unloads its surplus through several public benefit programs. Thanks to decades of USDA policy, milk is firmly embedded in the federal dietary guidelines, school lunches, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, and the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children.
But it's still not enough to manage the surplus. In 2016, farmers poured out tens of millions of gallons of excess milk onto fields and into pools of manure, the Wall Street Journal reported. And the buyouts continue: That same year, the USDA announced a new plan to purchase $20 million of cheddar cheese to deal with the then-record surplus, "while assisting food banks and other food assistance recipients"—the latest of many bailouts for the industry. In 2018, the USDA said it would also buy more fresh fluid milk to distribute to the Emergency Food Assistance Program, unrelated to the buyouts.
FAST FOOD COMPANIES

Americans can only eat so much cheese (35 pounds a year, according to USDA data). But while marketing surplus directly to consumers has its limits, company partnerships have had greater success.
To help sell its surplus in the 1990s, the National Dairy Promotion Board created Dairy Management Incorporated, a semi-public marketing branch of the USDA funded through government "checkoff" fees from dairy producers. This agency gave us the "Got Milk?" campaign and a host of popular fast food menu items, including Domino's seven-cheese pizzas and Taco Bell's very cheesy Quesalupa. A 2017 Bloomberg Businessweek investigation called the group of chemists and nutritionists the "Illuminati of cheese." "The checkoff [program] puts DMI's agents inside Burger King, Domino's, McDonald's, Pizza Hut, and Wendy's, where they're privy to each restaurant chain's most closely guarded trade secrets," writes Clint Rainey.
For a federal agency dedicated to improving overall nutrition and providing dietary guidance, these partnerships may seem like a contradiction—with good reason, experts say. DMI's efforts "impose health costs on Americans generally, but disproportionately harm low-income African Americans and Latina/os who live in urban centers dominated by fast food restaurants," argues legal scholar and food oppression expert Andrea Freeman in a 2013 report.



All the Taco Bells in the nation cannot solve the record-breaking surplus. In recent years, producers have turned their focus to foreign markets, in the hopes that the government can pass this glut onto other countries. But as Novakovic points out, the demand worldwide is not for processed American cheese. It's for the "specialty, European-style" variety (and perhaps, the occasional Quesalupa).

TAGSSCHOOL LUNCHESDAIRYCHEESEDIETARY GUIDELINES FOR AMERICANSDAIRY FARMSUNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

BY
EMILY MOON

Emily Moon is a staff writer at Pacific Standard. Previously she worked at the Chicago Sun-Times and the Herald-Times in Bloomington, Indiana. She is a graduate of Northwestern University.





WHAT WILL THE U.S. GOVERNMENT DO WITH 1.4 BILLION POUNDS OF CHEESE?
 

·
Diamond Member
Joined
·
13,057 Posts
OK if you say so. 1.4 Billion Pounds of Cheese to go with those sammiches. And uh, those links and data are seriously old. Like 2008 and 2014!
https://psmag.com/economics/what-will-the-us-government-do-with-1-4-billion-pounds-of-cheese

WHAT WILL THE U.S. GOVERNMENT DO WITH 1.4 BILLION POUNDS OF CHEESE?

https://goldenagecheese.blogspot.com/2011/02/shelf-life-for-different-cheeses.html#:~:text=For the refrigerator, they will generally last 14,cheeses last the longest, that is for sure.

so how does that work .. can't even hold it for a year.. yeah they buy it to subsidies the farmers sell it give it away donate to world hunger throw it away dump he milk and not even make cheese how does that become a reserve for emergency ? https://ricochet.com/734039/government-cheese/ 2020 numbers 2019 is over for cheese doesn't store that long

how about you go looking for a super pail of hard white wheat about now .. emergency essentials in out pleasant hill is taking preorders

you can only have reserves of food with some sort of shelf life cheese is a couple three weeks in the fridge or maybe 9-10 months in the freezer .. you got room in your freezer for a survival stock of cheese ?

and then what if the power goes out

best bet is to stock up on powdered milk and make your own yogurt or cheese

it gets worse https://www.foodingredientsfirst.com/news/us-dairy-urges-eu-not-to-dump-dairy-stockpiles-in-international-markets.html

the whole reason it hits the dairy farmers so hard is because it isn't wheat.. milk and milk products are perishable, best case a year ,with the exception of powdered milk .. any sizeable "reserve" is a downward pressure on the market driving prices under cost of production

and then this https://abcnews.go.com/Technology/story?id=8439522

Lactose is one of two sugars, or carbohydrates, that occur naturally in milk and in dairy products like cheese. Your body can only absorb carbohydrates after they've been broken down into glucose. Lactose breaks down with the help of the enzyme lactase, produced in the cells lining the small intestine

sort of shrinks the market not exactly a universal food once you start to grow up

do you stack cheese for emergencies ?
 

·
Diamond Member
Joined
·
13,057 Posts
afterthought to have milk for SHTF get a couple goats and learn to milk .. sort of like getting chickens for eggs or rabbits for meat

not everybody can .. might be good trade goods for trading with those that can't

technical advisor for this post was Ben Gunn for who much of my knowledge should be credited
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,173 Posts
afterthought to have milk for SHTF get a couple goats and learn to milk .. sort of like getting chickens for eggs or rabbits for meat

not everybody can .. might be good trade goods for trading with those that can't

technical advisor for this post was Ben Gunn for who much of my knowledge should be credited
LOL, I was just thinking of a goat when reading your reply! I rotate blocks of cheddar. I like sharp white cheddar from wisconsin the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
847 Posts
and we are closing meat processing plants and deporting immigrants working a poultry abattoirs, facing, if not an outright meat shortage, at least higher prices for Americans. What a deal
The sky in not falling. Our food chain is so efficient that when the shut down occurred it actually accounted for the 16% most Americans eat at Restaurants. That is why you saw a few empty shelves for a couple of weeks and localized shortages.

That same supply chain now accounts for the reduction in restaurant use and we are still supply much of the world with beef, poultry, vegetables, and grain.

We are even still importing Rice to China...

Considering the 1.4 billion mouths to feed in China, it should come as no surprise that the People’s Republic is the world’s third-biggest importer of rice behind Iran and Saudi Arabia
Fastest-Growing Suppliers of China’s Rice ImportsChinese purchases of rice from its largest supplier Thailand shrank by almost one-third (-32.1%) year over year, more severe than the overall -21.6% drop which encompasses statistics for all of China’s rice suppliers (where 2018 data is available).

  1. India: Up 1,126% since 2018
  2. Myanmar (Burma): Up 545.9%
  3. Italy: Up 400%
  4. Japan: Up 90%
  5. United States: Up 66.7%
  6. Pakistan: Up 61.6%
  7. Taiwan: Up 52.3%
  8. Cambodia: Up 39.6%
  9. Canada: No 2018 data
  10. Germany: No 2018 data
  11. Laos: Down -8.4%
  12. Thailand: Down -32%
  13. Vietnam: Down -67.4%
  14. Russia: Down -68.6%
http://www.worldstopexports.com/chinas-rice-imports-by-country/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
847 Posts
We've had our own mountains of butter and cheese, milk lakes etc. The .gov shouldn't intervene and use the public's money to give away to farmers, oil companies or anyone else.
Economics Estaban. Study it.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,089 Posts
This is from worldexports.com, May, 2020:
Top Providers of Chinese Imported RiceBelow are the 14 countries that supplied 100% of the rice imported by China during 2019.

  1. Thailand: US$345.7 million (27.6% of China’s total rice imports)
  2. Vietnam: $240.7 million (19.2%)
  3. Pakistan: $234.9 million (18.7%)
  4. Myanmar (Burma): $203.6 million (16.2%)
  5. Cambodia: $171.5 million (13.7%)
  6. Laos: $34.8 million (3%)
  7. Taiwan: $18.2 million (1.45%)
  8. Japan: $3.6 million (0.28%)
  9. India: $515,000 (0.04%)
  10. Russia: $148,000 (0.012%)
  11. Canada: $12,000 (0.001%)
  12. Italy: $10,000 (0.0008%)
  13. United States: $5,000 (0.0004%)
  14. Germany: $1,000 (0.0001%)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,089 Posts
And this is from Reuters, Dec, 2019:

China, the world’s largest rice producer, typically buys small amounts of U.S. rice. Purchases peaked at $5.311 million in 2010. In 2017, they totaled $759,000. So far this year, U.S. rice exports to China have been worth just $147,000.
 
1 - 20 of 53 Posts
Top