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This gun ran just fine. 4+ rollers brought the gap to 0.17. For hundreds of rounds. It was my truck gun. Then it quit ejecting. Every round stovepipe. I called Jeff down in Oklahoma ie Ghilliebear and he said he did not mess with these. So I'm either going to find a Smith to fix it or sell it as a project gun.
 

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This gun ran just fine. 4+ rollers brought the gap to 0.17. For hundreds of rounds. It was my truck gun. Then it quit ejecting. Every round stovepipe. I called Jeff down in Oklahoma ie Ghilliebear and he said he did not mess with these. So I'm either going to find a Smith to fix it or sell it as a project gun.
So some questions, they may seem simple or stupid but they are not meant to insult.
1) have you tried cleaning out the flutes in the chamber?
2) What type of ammo are you using?
3) is the extractor not gripping the casing? is it tearing off/tearing up the case rim?
4) have you tried replacing the extractor spring? Maybe it is slipping off during the beginning of recoil?
5) does it extract an unfired round or is it not extracting any round fired or unfired?
 

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I admittedly don't know much about these, having only owned one about a year.

My C308 runs perfectly with steel cased ammo, but will occasionally stovepipe with brass. Seems like the brass deforms more and sometimes hangs up in the flutes. I picked up one of the surplus Swiss cleaning kits, and the chamber brush seems to have made a difference. That fluted chamber can be a hassle to clean, compared to most where you can get away with just a boresnake.
 

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Was able to take the Cetme out and test fire it today.

Functioned perfectly with 7.62 American Eagle and 7.62 Winchester brown box. Even with the AR-style buttstock, without a buttpad, the recoil still felt very manageable and surprisingly smooth. I just really enjoy firing the 7.62/.308 battle rifles.

I'm thinking most of the issues were related to the magazine that came with it. I purchased a few NOS original Cetme mags, and those are the ones I used today for the test. The supplied mag didn't fit in the mag well very good, and didn't want to latch without significant effort. After cleaning up the edges of the mag well to remove some burrs and scrapes, the new mags slid right in and latched easily.

So now it's on to some cosmetic work and replacement of non-original parts. I'd like to take it back to its original configuration.

I will be looking for a nice wood buttstock and handguard. Doesn't need to be perfect, just not roughed-up too much. I plan to refinish it.

Please PM me if you have them for sale.

Thanks.
 

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See my post on fixing Cetme...its above. For the mag well these receivers are actually HK spec'd so you can dremel the inside of the mag well for any rough areas and fitment. I jewelry file where needed, if needed. The key is the mag release latch. Dump the Cetme in favor of a HK mag release. Your mags will go in and slide out like butter.

Right mag release ease, is relational to right receiver match. Once fixed, HK mags operate the same with ease.

One very important variable that we American shooters don't expect, with this design is the maintenance aspects with regard to the delayed roller blowback rifles, that being, the springs and weight of the bolt carriers in relation to the entire cycling processes as it applies to this engineering design.

These rifles take a beating, and require maintenance, and often. Recoil springs and the standard buffer assembly should be replaced every 2.5k rounds...max. A solution is the Bill Springfield designed Progressive Coil Spring Assembly. You'll be done with replacing that part! It'll reduce felt recoil by 20% easy.

The HK recoil spring is the same as the Cetme....line your old one up next to your new one.....that's what 60 years plus will do.....typically the Cetme springs are spent....they will be shorter in length. See this all the time.

Many of the rifles just need maintenance updating or some tweaking and they just resurrect themselves, and are a joy to own.

In many cases, the process of elimination, should be called the process of frustrations with these. Using American know how, lapping the receivers and the other steps, the end result is rather astonishing to owners. Additionally, these rifles working properly and scoped are superbly accurate for their design.

You may pm me for servicing or any questions. I'm always available to help anyone here within the USA.
 
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