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Discussion Starter #1
I'm thinning out some of my accumulated ammo. This case appears to never have been opened. Does anyone have an idea of value? If I were to sell it, would it be better to open it and sell it by the box or sell it as a complete case? I've never seen another so I'm leaning toward keeping it. It has markings all over it, have shown a tag that appears on it 2 or 3 times. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.

SCWood
 

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that is neat ..never know what someone will come up with..i would try to sell first as a sealed case..that crate is great too, looks heavy duty..any idea as to the year?? it is 45 long colt?? is it US army stuff?
 

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This seems to be kind of a tricky one.Something about the case seems british. Being that its unopened,its hard to judge on the value,then again its also opening the case that might hurt the value. Its probably WW1-WW2.
 

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This seems to be kind of a tricky one.Something about the case seems british. Being that its unopened,its hard to judge on the value,then again its also opening the case that might hurt the value. Its probably WW1-WW2. Id sit on it for a while
 

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.45 Revolver Crate

The Case is Canadian ("DC" Dominion Cartridge Co.) of WW I origin, and the ammo is .45 Colt ( New Service Revolver, or "M1909" as sometimes known).

This ammo was made for both Canadian use at home and in Europe (WWI) as the Canadians, as well as having both Colts and S&Ws in .455 Webley, also acquired quantities of 45 Colt-chambered "New Service" revolvers direct from Colt.

Now the conundrum...if the Box is sealed and original, does one break it up and sell the individual packets out(as collector's items, being sealed originals, or retain the entire crate as a "Real Complete" Item.???


Nice find,
Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics

BTW, the cases are single flash-hole Boxer primed, but corrosive.

Addendum: Check the Date after the "DC" on the label...it looks like 29...??...15 (or 45?). The case style is the "resealable" type common in British Empire Ammo designs, and 180 rounds is a typical Pistol ammo quantity ( 6 or 12 round mini packs). "DC" made ammo in both wars under the same Headstamp.

To check the integrity of the contents, Remove the cotter pins (on string) which "Lock" the steel straps in place...then swing the straps outwards, and remove lid. Inside there should be a sealed (soft solder) Tin liner... if the case has been previously opened, it will be obvious... Hopefuilly it is still sealed, and com[plete. If, sadly it is "opened" and even some of the contents missing, then the sale of part of the Packets (keeping the Crate, Liner and one sample packet, would not be against "true collector practice".

Doc AV
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all your replies. Know a lot more now than I did yesterday.

DocAV is right about the Canadian thing. Have attached some more photos. That broad arrow in the C must be Canadian.

As I look at it more closely, a couple of the screw heads are buggered...guess I just need to go ahead and open it..when I do..I'll post a picture of the contents here...would hate it if it had 4 or 5 old Colts in it instead of ammo. When I shake it, it sounds like it is full..the whole load shifts..I don't hear anything loose rattling around. When I saw those strings, I just assumed it hadn't been opened. My fear is that I will some how, hurt the value, by taking it apart...I am a much better "take apart" guy than "put back together" guy.

I guess there is no way to determine a value unless it opened.

Have attached some more photos. Thanks again.

SCWood
 

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.45 Colt ammo crate

The Date is clearer now, 1944 production, probably for "Home" use (Canadians overseas tended to be issued with John Inglis Made Browning High Power Pistols in 9mm.

You don't need to touch the screws...the case is designed to open, by pulling the Pins (one on each steel top strap) and then the steel strap with only two (Hinge) screws, can be pushed off the top, (it will swing outward) and then the Lid can be lifted upwards at the free end, and will come out of engagement from the other (Fixed strap--4 screws) end.

AS the "seal label" (the woven fabric black printed tape) is already detached, you are NOT "breaking the seal" as it has already come adrift.

Once the wooden Lid is removed, there is a tinplate soldered liner, with a "rip-top" handle, which can be peeled back...if it is still soldered shut,, LEAVE IT ALONE...you have a sealed can....Much more valuable.

If it has been Peeled and then replaced, then you will have to inspect the contents of the Liner...for completeness, etc and condition. Then you can decide to "Part it out" if it is imcomplete. If it is still full, with the only defect the broken soldering etc, then you have a problem of whether to part it out or retain it as a complete, but opened container.

Let us know how you get along.

These crates were originally designed (back in the 1800s) as "Re-usable", to be collected, sent back to the factory for refurbishment, and re-use...fine for Peacetime, silly in Total War....

Regards, Doc AV
AV Ballistics.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Doc AV,

I got around to opening the crate this weekend. Unfortunately, it is missing 6 boxes. The metal lid appears to be held down by some sort of glue. Downward pressure from the lid stopped the contents from rattling around in the partially filled can. All of the 12 boxes that are in the can are sealed. I'm guessing each box contains 10 rounds of ammo for a total of 180.

The crate arrangement as you stated, would probably not be very practical for a battlefield situation. It is kind of slick the way that the can of ammo slides/fits perfectly in the wooden shipping crate. Since the crates were reused, I imagine they took quite a beating. This one is in very nice condition. The crate would certainly serve its' purpose of protecting the can and its' contents.

Thanks everyone for your replies. I have attached some photos of the open crate.

SCWood
 

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Hi Guy's
The Canadian Army did not use the 45 Colt it was used by the (RCN) Royal Canadian Navy.
The Army used some .455 early in the war (WW2) but used .380 S&W Rev and then late in the war 9mm Inglis.
That was a nice find.
Cheers
 
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