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Looking for info on this Carrand Rifle. Looks to be converted from flint and dated 1814? Bought near Blue Ridge GA in 1936 by my Dad. I talked to the grandson of the man who may have sold it.Any info would be great.
 

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Here we go again!!! 'Yall posting the most interesting pieces to appear on the Forum in a long time, and youn's put up 3 photos that show you NOTHING beyond what appears to be a very interesting rifle! PHOTOS...PHOTOS...PHOTOS! If you want information that close to right, or totally right, POST SEVERAL G-O-O-D photos!

This piece appears, maybe, could be, etc etc a Soddy Daisy Rifle. It could also be a Lawing piece, or Lawing influenced, but it could be a number of different "species" also! At this point, with the photos (?) posted about all that can be said is that it is a Southern Mountain Rifle! Caliber? .36cal or .40cal maybe? The name...Carrand? I have a very comprehensive list of Southern Mountain Rifle makers, but none with this name! Please double check on this and PLEASE put up good quality photos! Photograph the muzzle...the muzzle cap is important! The lockplate, also. Good photos here so we can sort out the possible caplock conversion. Closeup of the buttplate, entry thimble, left side of the stock...a cheekpiece?? Was the rear site moved foward? Do this and I think we can sort it out for you! Uh, by the way....I growed up up thar at the base of the Coosa Bald not 35 or so miles from Blue Ridge!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Woods thanks, sorry for the poor pics.. PM me if you like.Yes , front sight was moved forward and the lock /bolster sure looks like a flint conversion.Sure you know Gillespie from N.C., have His CW musket.
DW has "misplaced" the charger for the digital camera, had to use old 35mm and scan the pics. Here's some more, hopefully better. Not sure how viewing pics works for any one else but I've found if you click on the pic, click again until the small blue cross appears one can get a close up of the pic.
 

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Can't say much about the rifle other than that I read the date as "1874" rather than "1814".

The lock is a "hardware store" lock and was made as percussion, it is not a converted flint lock. This type of inexpensive lock certainly dates to the late 19th Century and was easily available as late as WW2. The drum and nipple percussioning was used both when building a new gun as well as when converting from flint to percussion, it was the least expensive method as well as the easiest to use for making a percussion gun.

Other features dating the gun to the third quarter of the 19th Century are the narrow, curved butt plate and the trigger guard and most especially the stock architecture. The patch box is also dates to this period as does the small caliber.

63H20, I hope you don't take offense to the above information, it is just my opinion and is worth exactly what you paid for it but it does come from the experience of handling muzzleloading firearms for 50+ years. Others may see it differently and if so will likely give you their, I'm sure, equally valid opinions.
 

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I've got to ponder this one a little, and will when I finish up my logging operations inspections this evening. One quick thing.....yes, I'm very familiar with the Gillespies and what they produced. They were an East Fork, North Carolina family of gunmakers, and John and his brother James moved down to my home county, Union, in Georgia and continued the gunmaking trade. I have handled original Gillespie pieces, own one, own a contemporary made by John's GGgrandson, and helped Dennis Glazener (who recently wrote a book on Gillespie rifle makers) locate the original Gillespie rifle shop between Blairsville-Young Harris Georgia.
 

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Thanks for the replys:
TP, no offense. My Dad bought the rifle in 1936 for a few bucks, I'm looking for info is all. This one is of lower quality than the others, especially the Towry.These rifles are not my area of collecting interest.
woods,
Know about Glazener , a friend of mine in VA is a close friend of his and has the Gillespie rifle my Dad bought in 36. John's or James's daughter was a friend of my Grandmother, thats how my Dad got the CW musket. Her name was Currans. Perhaps you know more of their family tree?
You know anything about Towry? A well known gun auction recently sold a Towry as made in Texas? He is listed as a Mills RiverN.C. gun maker.
..
 

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Looked at my Dads notes and discovered that he indeed did buy it from the Grandfather of the fellow I talked to near Stewart's Mill GA. He is very interested in buying it, so the rifle will soon have a new home. Also learned the Towry family is having a family reunion in Asheville next year.
 

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TANSTAAFL,
Yes, nose cap is poured pewter. Pretty sure the grandson wants it , and the price will be right.
As to the Towry, found his Confederate record in Vol 1 and V of N.C. Infantry Regiments, Companies E and F ,12th Infantry, talked to his great great grandaughter and another lady that's a Towry family historian , she even sent me a pic of John Towry on his front porch ca 1890's. Found his headstone listed in the church cemetery survey and learned he made furniture and was a postmaster. Meeting the great great grandaughter, her son and daughter so they can see the rifle. Nice when everything comes together.
 
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