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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
PerversPépère
Posted - 01/12/2004 : 1:47:58 PM
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By the way, is there a way to clean and refinish that stock without defacing it or detracting from the way the stockmakers did? what kind of finish was used (BLO, tung oil, teck oil, BLO-turpentine-beeswax mix or shellack)?
Any suggestions will be welcome.



Carcano
Posted - 01/12/2004 : 4:49:16 PM
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First, have a *very* thorough and careful look at the stock to determine whether it ever had a shellac finish. Shellac was usually applied over wood and metal alike, so you would e.g. find some shellac traces at the line where the magazine contacts the stock, or at the rear sling swivels.

Secondly, some Carcanos stocks were finished with another kind of light clear varnish (only outside, not stock channel), this *always* then in connection with a light to middle brown wood stain (I do not believe that the varnish itself was tainted, but am not sure). Try to find out whether this was the case.

If neither, disassemble gun completely, and use a soft brush or a soft sponge (not the "cauldron extra heavy duty" type) with hot water and light (ecological) dishwashing detergent. Some people also recommend a mild, not perfumed shampoo. As funny as this second suggestion may read at first, it is well thought out: a shampoo that won't harm your skin and your eyes will also not a harm a organic material like wood in the long run. Do not totally immerse the stock in a bath, in order not to provoke rust on the magazine screw pillars and the recoil lug insert.

After cleaning and steaming out the dents (some minor dents will already come out by the brushing procedure), the stock should be oiled. I do not really know whether the Italians used linseed oil or industrial olive oil, though one can sometimes read assertions of the latter. Somebody who owns an Italian infantry manual would maybe known ?



Atlpete
Posted - 01/12/2004 : 6:30:53 PM
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Mild shampoo does make a lot of sense as it's formulated to dissolve the human skin(scalp)oil and grime compound that typically make one's hair funky (and eventually a rifle stock grimey.) Certainly can't be worse than some of the stuff I've tried(on my gunky the rifles that is
 

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When I want to preserve the integrity and originality of a stock I use either petroleum jelly or pure tung oil as a cleaning agent. The peroleum jelly method has been discussed elsewhere on this forum so just do a search. As for the tung oil method it's dead simple: Apply some pure undiluted TO to the surface of the wood and allow to sit for a minute or two. The PTO will blend itself with whatever is sitting on top of the wood but won't dissolve it. Take a terry cloth towel and rub out the stock removing all traces of TO and dirt. Repeast if necessary. To protect the wood I use pure carnauba. If you want to try this for yourself just make sure your use PURE, RAW TUNG OIL that has the consistency of room temperature molasses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
WillRuss
Posted - 06/04/2006 : 07:56:25 AM
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I can't speak to the authenticity as I just recieved my first Carcano this week. It's an Finn M38, though, and it has what appears to be a BLO finish. I won't advise you on what to do with yours, but when I receive a rifle with a bad "bubba" finish, I remove it with a chemical stripper - no sanding - then apply the "correct" finish coat. I especially like a product you can find at Wal-Mart or Home Depot called "Citrustrip". It removes just about any kind of finish and won't harm the wood.



DMala
Posted - 06/06/2006 : 2:14:19 PM
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Some of the military arsenal post-WWII refurbishments were made using a thick, high-gloss varnish for the stock. I believe it is plain ugly, but since I interpret it as historically correct, I am going to leave it on my pieces.



DMala
Posted - 06/07/2006 : 11:02:16 AM
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It is hard to judge for sure from a picture. The original post-WWII varnished refurbs have a thick, high gloss, old-fashioned spar varnish look, not that plastic, less transparent, look of modern polyurethane varnishes. It's hard to explain in words.
 
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