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Speaking of addictions. Here is a 1899 Brescia TS FAT47 refurb I recently got. Overall, in a good shape with lots of cosmoline except for the nasty rust on the mag well. I imagine it's even worse under the wood. Thinking to swap the magazine well with a turd of a cavalry carbine I have where the rust is not the problem. How to get those screws loose? A drop of Kroil on top and let it sit? Any other suggestions? Leaving it be is not an option really, because of all the cosmo gunk inside that'd be a pain in the ass to get out. I think I remembered someone else having the same problem before but can not find the thread...

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PB blaster and Kroil and let it sit. You can also add some ATF old tranny fluid.

Do a few drops on them every 3 hours and let it sit 3 days while renewing oil. Time is your friend. Then take a well fitting screw driver in the slot and hit it straight down with a smack or two. See if it turns a wee bit. If it does, more oil and move back and forth. If it does not move, then you can soak more, drill it out, or carefully use a new punch and hit the slot and attempt to turn the screw loose like on old car parts. Both drill and punch will destroy the screw. Be sure you do not bugger the surrounding metal.
I would also suggest a sharp old razor blade or exacto blade to clean the crack around the metal /wood of rust so oil can get/soak in. Just a fine cut between the metal and wood. Do not get crazy removing wood. You want a thin double edge razor blade cut so oil can soak in from the outside of the wood. Most of the rust will be around the screw head and metal, not at the threads. But it depends. The head may have to be drilled???? Tricky as to not bugger the surround screw pocket. Some screws turn out by hand after the head is gone and a stub remains to turn out. Others are frozen with time and you are screwed. It will take a drill and tap job with correct threads for the metric replacement screw. New taps and drills should be used and slightly smaller drill work than the hole size. Do you have a set of number drills? Tread gauges? Taps?

SRF forum sticky:

more time: see this reference:
 

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Actually it does not look too bad, you can still see a screw:) Soak, soak, soak, time, time, time; then a smack, smack, and soak some more, then a smack or two. Try to turn, no? Soak , smack, soak, smack. Got the idea. After a week, it should break free. I have also used an old electric soldier iron's tip on the screw head to heat it for 10 min or more, then smack and cool with oil. No torch to burn the wood. The old 1940s irons, not the cheep new junk.
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I had a similar situation on one of mine a few months back and even broke a at head screw driver head trying to unscrew it even after soaking it in kroil. I unfortunately ended up drilling out the head on mine but that should be your last resort obviously.
 

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Be patient and try not to rush it. Get a good fitting screwdriver too. I bought a set of Craftsman screwdrivers with a diamond grip tip when I was cleaning all the Carcano’s I bought last year. It might be a gimmick, but having the right size and non slip seemed to make a difference. I have an extra set of those screws I ordered online and didn’t use. I’d pass them along for the same price if you end up needing them.
 

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I had this exact same problem for the past few weeks. My front screw budget with some effort but the rear one was IN THERE. I soaked it for five days in pb blaster rotating sides and letting it sit and added more three times a day. Still nothing.

What solved my issue was a wider screwdriver with a better grip and a longer shank. The penetrating oil didn't do too much I do not believe but it could have contributed. I still put it all on the better screwdriver. The rear screw only has threads for a little ways on the tip where it comes out the top of the rear tang area. Where mine was rusted was the middle where it wasn't threaded.

Created this account just for this post :D
 

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I am the one who had the same problem a few weeks ago. The screw finally came out after soaking in KROIL as described then using an impact screw driver I got at Harbor Freight. Make sure the wrist is firmly against something. I used a 2x4 saw horse. A helper is useful to hold the rifle while you hit the driver. My cleaning rod was also stuck in the stock. After removing the barreled action I had to grind the rod in two so I could remove the bayonet lug. That really chapped my arse but I had no choice due to the rust. Best of luck to you. It looks like you got a pretty nice one.
 

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Along with the good advice others are recommending here (Kroil, well fitting bit, tapping it in with a hammer) I recommend a ratcheting screwdriver. I personally recommend the Tekton 135 bit set with screwdriver (Only $35).
 

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Actually it does not look too bad, you can still see a screw:) Soak, soak, soak, time, time, time; then a smack, smack, and soak some more, then a smack or two. Try to turn, no? Soak , smack, soak, smack. Got the idea. After a week, it should break free. I have also used an old electric soldier iron's tip on the screw head to heat it for 10 min or more, then smack and cool with oil. No torch to burn the wood. The old 1940s irons, not the cheep new junk.
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yes heat & penetrating oil is the way to go!!!
 

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Buy or borrow a hammer driver and a rubber mallet. Use correct bit and tap, tap, tap. Hammer driver will move anything eventually, just be patient. That is what they are made for. Of course oil the devil out of it first and let it soak. Been there and done that with two that made yours look pristine.
 
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I'd be careful pulling out the trigger guard too, if the rust is too bad it will cause splinters in the wood.
 
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