Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Carcano M91 Moschetto di Cavaleria
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I made a chart to compare boxed ammo for the Carcano 6.52 at .267 Hornady 160 gr SP and Privi Partizan brass.
I seems too steep maybe I miscalculated something, if you guy could help validate the numbers that would be awesome


Rectangle Font Slope Parallel Screenshot
 

·
Moderator / Silver Bullet member
Joined
·
7,509 Posts
My cost for my reloads will be way different than this ... I have had all of my reloading equipment for many, many years and at this point it is has paid for itself well beyond what I paid for them so to me it will all be $ 0.00. As to components (primers, powder, brass) that is also going to be different, I bought all of this well before the pandemic when prices were much, much lower. I also just bought some bullets recently, .264 Hornady 160 gr. RN for $ 32.00 a box of 100. I also had a good stash of them before the pandemic as well. Brass pays for itself after a few loading's as well, I got some that I have reloaded up to 10 times already.
Basically it all comes down to the individual who is reloading and has been doing so or now just is starting now, the cost will be different.

Patrick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,018 Posts
You can choose to account for the initial cost of equipment however you want, but it looks like your cost per round of powder for the reloaded ammo is way off. There are 7000 grains in a pound, so with a 30 grain charge you should be able to get about 230 rounds per pound. That's less than 14 cents per round at your quoted per pound cost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,337 Posts
^ what he said... powder calculation is WAY off.

I don't think it's fair to calculate reloading equipment into the equation. People almost never get into reloading for ONE caliber... why would you, that's a lot of effort. I have thousands of dollars invested into reloading gear but some of it, for example bullet casting stuff for 9mm, saves me a HUGE amount of money over new factory ammo. I have probably broke even just on that alone over the years. Other calibers have cost me money - I have probably $100+ into my 7.7 Jap adventure and I've made exactly 20 rounds of loaded ammo thus far. But that's OK, it all washes out in the long run.

The only fair way to include equipment is for dies ONLY, or some very specific piece... case length gauge or something like that.
 

·
Registered
Carcano M91 Moschetto di Cavaleria
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was using grams instead of grains ... i will adjust the chart and repost it .... that is why I reached for feedback from more experienced reloaders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,337 Posts
Now that I'm looking harder at the spreadsheet - why would you use a Lee Load-master press instead of a cheaper single stage? And I see you don't have dies listed either. That will change your calculation quite a bit.
 

·
Moderator / Silver Bullet member
Joined
·
7,509 Posts
Now that I'm looking harder at the spreadsheet - why would you use a Lee Load-master press instead of a cheaper single stage? And I see you don't have dies listed either. That will change your calculation quite a bit.
yup, those are needed as well as some sort of cartridge case trimming system as well, you will need to trim the brass. You also will need case lube and deburring tool as well.

Patrick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
709 Posts
Just how many rounds do you plan on shooting. Setting up to reload just one caliber is expensive these days. If you will not be shooting a lot and the ammunition is available, maybe just go with store bought ammo.
But if money cost is important, first reduce the cost of your investment.
You do not need to get a 300 dollar plus reloading press for reloading. Some of the equipment that you list while useful. is not absolutely necessary if cost is important to you. If you are going to invest in a lot of equipment be thinking of casting your bullets.
 

·
Registered
Carcano M91 Moschetto di Cavaleria
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Just how many rounds do you plan on shooting. Setting up to reload just one caliber is expensive these days. If you will not be shooting a lot and the ammunition is available, maybe just go with store bought ammo.
But if money cost is important, first reduce the cost of your investment.
You do not need to get a 300 dollar plus reloading press for reloading. Some of the equipment that you list while useful. is not absolutely necessary if cost is important to you. If you are going to invest in a lot of equipment be thinking of casting your bullets.
Dies I have
Lee 6.52 Pace Setter Carcano
Lee Collet dies for 6.5 x 55 Swedish -- helps with the proper case sizing
Lee Precision 30M1 Carbine 3 Die Set
The Kit comes setup for 30-30 with the dies included

I will be shooting:
Automag III - ,30 Mi Carabine caliber
BFR 30-30 10 inch barrel
Carcano 1896 M91 6,52 only on a gun rest, I have serious health issues and cannot shoulder the weapon or take recoil

so I believe the loadmaster being a little more expensive still comes in handy for me. I may not use all the stations at first
but after reloading 500 or more rounds I should be in a better position to take advantage of it. Plus it is fully loaded
so I have minimal accessories to buy.

Updated Chart makes more sense now that I measured 30grain into 1lb yielding 233 loads

Colorfulness Rectangle Slope Font Material property
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
709 Posts
Dies I have
Lee 6.52 Pace Setter Carcano
Lee Collet dies for 6.5 x 55 Swedish -- helps with the proper case sizing
Lee Precision 30M1 Carbine 3 Die Set
The Kit comes setup for 30-30 with the dies included

I will be shooting:
Automag III - ,30 Mi Carabine caliber
BFR 30-30 10 inch barrel
Carcano 1896 M91 6,52 only on a gun rest, I have serious health issues and cannot shoulder the weapon or take recoil

so I believe the loadmaster being a little more expensive still comes in handy for me. I may not use all the stations at first
but after reloading 500 or more rounds I should be in a better position to take advantage of it. Plus it is fully loaded
so I have minimal accessories to buy.

Updated Chart makes more sense now that I measured 30grain into 1lb yielding 233 loads

View attachment 3876159
From my experience I would get a good powerful single stage press first. But you can buy it last or later if you find that you need it.
Likely for the carcano you can get by with neck sizing only.
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
8,413 Posts
Dollar per round comparisons of commercial vs. reloads do not take into account the time invested in making the reload.

I have been reloading now for 14 years. Actually, I resumed reloading after many years of inactivity. Only when I was able to join a range club and shoot at leisure did reloading make sense again. If I were to total up the costs of the equipment I have acquired, exclusive of consumable components, I would probably need to take some medication.

Reloading is a long term investment. I am now regularly approached by club members about getting into reloading. I must realistically douse their initial enthusiastic curiosity with cold water. This is not a good time to enter into reloading. Both tools and components are scarce now and prices have gone way up. But reloading is now just about the only way to keep many fine vintage milsurp rifles active.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
709 Posts
Dollar per round comparisons of commercial vs. reloads do not take into account the time invested in making the reload.

I have been reloading now for 14 years. Actually, I resumed reloading after many years of inactivity. Only when I was able to join a range club and shoot at leisure did reloading make sense again. If I were to total up the costs of the equipment I have acquired, exclusive of consumable components, I would probably need to take some medication.

Reloading is a long term investment. I am now regularly approached by club members about getting into reloading. I must realistically douse their initial enthusiastic curiosity with cold water. This is not a good time to enter into reloading. Both tools and components are scarce now and prices have gone way up. But reloading is now just about the only way to keep many fine vintage milsurp rifles active.
There is much experience and wisdom in that you say.
In the past for rounds like 9mm it just did not pay to reload if your time was costed into the equation. If it pays now I would have to do the math. But you cannot get any ammo, than if you have accumulated the components it is worth your time.
Right now it does pay for me to reload 7.62 nato and 30-06, 30-30, M1 carbine, and probably 300 blackout.

For training ammo I can get 7.62x39 and 54 at close to 50 cents around give or take a few pennies. I would only reload those when good loads with expanding bullets are needed. The same thinking for 5.56.
 

·
Registered
Carcano M91 Moschetto di Cavaleria
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
There is much experience and wisdom in that you say.
In the past for rounds like 9mm it just did not pay to reload if your time was costed into the equation. If it pays now I would have to do the math. But you cannot get any ammo, than if you have accumulated the components it is worth your time.
Right now it does pay for me to reload 7.62 nato and 30-06, 30-30, M1 carbine, and probably 300 blackout.

For training ammo I can get 7.62x39 and 54 at close to 50 cents around give or take a few pennies. I would only reload those when good loads with expanding bullets are needed. The same thinking for 5.56.
Hi

This is my current status

I have terminal cancer with maybe 3 years to live at best, when I was a teen with 3 or 4 shotguns I helped my dad reload the shells, we would load 500 to 1000 shells per session.

I am on Longer term disability and do not see a return to work date any time soon, so this hobby will actually help me pass the time, and for my own tastes I am no longer
into the McGyverism like i used to for the longest time, I come to realize that $$$ do not follow to the grave and enjoy your life while keeping relatively simple is a great option.

Oh and we used to bottle our wine and cork them twice a year at about 500 bottles per session so long tedious sessions are no big deal and much better than the one arm jack slot machines pulling the crank 500 times could be a costly experience .. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,337 Posts
so I believe the loadmaster being a little more expensive still comes in handy for me. I may not use all the stations at first
but after reloading 500 or more rounds I should be in a better position to take advantage of it. Plus it is fully loaded
so I have minimal accessories to buy.
I would really suggest a single stage for every caliber you listed. Turret/progressive presses are designed for volume and the cheaper ones are geared towards pistol cartridges...especially straight wall ones where you can use carbide dies and lube is not a factor.

I have two Lee turret presses and will tell you that they are great for pistol reloading. I certainly COULD reload rifle rounds on them... but there is FAR more "hands on" work involved in that for trimming, lubing, measuring case length, etc. Loading rifle rounds is just so much easier on a single stage because you have to physically handle everything anyway.

Really you do not NEED a tumbler either... it makes your brass look nice, but necessary? Definitely not.
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
8,413 Posts
Re presses: I got an RCBS Rock Chucker when I decided to resume reloadiing. I quickly became disenchanted with my choice; decapped primers went everywhere except into the plastic receptacle, and it also cams over. I put up with this until I got a Lee Classic cast iron press. This press has very tidy decapped primer disposal and it is impossible to cam over owing to the design of its linkage. I was completely satisfied with this press, but in the meantime I discovered a use for the Rock Chucker's cam over.

I began to neck size with the Lee collet dies. After some time of fiddling, and replacing stripped die caps, I found that by adjusting the die's seating in the Rock Chucker I could use the cam over to my advantage, getting just the right amount of force for correct neck tension. I also found the Rock Chucker useful for pulling bullets. So it remained.

I was tipped off about the Forster CoAx press by an experienced reloader friend. I found one on sale and got it, and it changed my outlook on reloading completely. Over time I also acquired Forster dies to use with it. In the meantime my Lee Classic press was sold to a friend in desperate need of a press during the Obamament.

Anticipating reloading pistol ammo, I picked up a Lee Classic turret press. It now sits on my bench next to the Forster CoAx. Its turrets are populated with the Lee universal decapper die and three Lee combined trim, deburr and chamfer body dies. I found the Lee system for case trimming superior to a lathe in efficiency. As I added more calibers, I just got another turret to hold the additional body dies. I have efficient through put; after resizing the case goes into the Lee trimmer. A few turns of the handle and the case is trimmed, deburred and chamfered in one quick operation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,337 Posts
I started with a Lee Challenger press which is basically one step above nothing. It served me very well until just last year when I replaced it with a Rock Chucker. I'm not super satisfied with that swap, I broke the Lee press several times but I have the same complaints about the RCBS one that Leon mentioned. It works well enough for rifle ammo, though.

Lee has a reputation for being cheap junk and some of it definitely is but there's a lot that's not. Some of their products are really innovative.

Its turrets are populated with the Lee universal decapper die and three Lee combined trim, deburr and chamfer body dies.
My two Lee turrets are dedicated to pistol ammo. One of them always has a 9mm die set in it... the other gets swapped out with 45 ACP, 45 Colt, 7.62 Nagant and a couple others. I may pick up another turret and copy your idea - I have a bunch of Lee trim dies and their decapper is great. That would save me some time during the prep process.
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
8,413 Posts
I started with a Lee Challenger press which is basically one step above nothing. It served me very well until just last year when I replaced it with a Rock Chucker. I'm not super satisfied with that swap, I broke the Lee press several times but I have the same complaints about the RCBS one that Leon mentioned. It works well enough for rifle ammo, though.
I sold my Lee Classic press to a friend whose Challenger broke. He used it for years and made great reloads with it. He has remained with my ex Lee Classic and is very happy with it.

Lee has a reputation for being cheap junk and some of it definitely is but there's a lot that's not. Some of their products are really innovative.
You have to pick and choose. The Lee cast iron presses are durable and work very well. I have not used any of their aluminum presses, so no comment.

The cheap plastic Lee "Perfect" powder measure is accurate and throws consistent charges. Its metering system, however, is not the most ergonomic, although it works. It is just inconvenient to adjust. I have several of these and each is dedicated to a particular powder and charge. Once I lock in a load, I can go from development to production, and the low cost of the Lee Perfect measures lets me have my powder charge set up and ready for a batch at all times.

For development I got the Lee Classic powder measure. The metering tube on this model is much easier to adjust and throws are just as accurate as the plastic version. There is a newer model out now, with what appears to be an alloy body instead of cast iron, as on my original model, so I have no personal experience with it.

The Lee balance beam powder scale is incredibly accurate, but it is a bit complicated to adjust, and its poor damping will drive you to distraction waiting for the beam to stop oscillating. I kept mine, however, and use it from time to time to check the accuracy of my old RCB 5-10 powder scale. I do not use electronic scales.

As mentioned, the Lee Quick Trim system is tops IMHO. It may be a nuisance having to keep swapping dies in a single stage press, but combined with a turret press it is great. If you've got an old Challenger lying around,this is a great way to use it.

Lee dies: I use the collet neck sizer dies and the factory crimp dies. For resizing and seating I use Forster dies, except for the Hornady dies for the calibers Forster does not cover: Swiss 7.5x55 and 30-40 Krag.
 

·
Registered
Carcano M91 Moschetto di Cavaleria
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
I started with a Lee Challenger press which is basically one step above nothing. It served me very well until just last year when I replaced it with a Rock Chucker. I'm not super satisfied with that swap, I broke the Lee press several times but I have the same complaints about the RCBS one that Leon mentioned. It works well enough for rifle ammo, though.

Lee has a reputation for being cheap junk and some of it definitely is but there's a lot that's not. Some of their products are really innovative.



My two Lee turrets are dedicated to pistol ammo. One of them always has a 9mm die set in it... the other gets swapped out with 45 ACP, 45 Colt, 7.62 Nagant and a couple others. I may pick up another turret and copy your idea - I have a bunch of Lee trim dies and their decapper is great. That would save me some time during the prep process.

I looked at the turret presses and they do seem to cover all the bases, and I will be giving a full review as there does not seem to too much difference, as long as it has the
the accessories. I just want to have the cycles in place but locked to onE station at a time and switch after each step
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top