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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I noticed this Cooey Mdl 55 single shot rifle c. 1938 at a local show last Saturday, but I passed on it. During the night I must have dreamed about it because something was bothering me. It had a mark on the buttstock that looked like a broad arrow and just below it was a number. Also there is a "D" stamped on the stock, just fwd of the trigger guard.
I have a Cooey Mdl 82 trainer and I thought that this was the one, and only .22RF trainer used by the Canadians. Well, I bought it the following day. Here it is:









Was this some kind of Cadet trainer? Any information would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.


LDHare
 

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Never saw this model,IMO the gun was procured by the Canadian Army in a moment of haste when there were no trainers or Cooey was developing the trainer we know, which is no more than a very simple civilian action and the stock follows thelines of the SMLE.Nice piece and rather rare-
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Raul for the response to my inquiry. I thought that it may be an example of early WWII Canadian expedience. Just never seen such a critter down here in the States.


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From observations over the years and the list of guns purchased in Skennertons "Small Arms Contracts," England purchased a number of Cooey rifles of all models at the start of the war. A book can be written on all the various .22 rifles they purchased. Most came back in the early 1960's and were sold by Springfield Sporters. All are commercial proofed and some have broad arrows.
 

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Breakeyp, you're right, I have a commercial 22 procured by the UK during the war,I have it in my summer house and have not touched it for years, I dont remeber the maker, but I do remember that it has a stamp saying "not an english make" or something similar-
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks reddog. It's nothing fancy, but simple, functional, with an interesting history. Thanks also to breakeyp and Raul for the help with understanding the history of this rifle. I'm actually surprised that any of the small arms "loaned" to our British brothers in their time of need, actually came back home and did not end up as scrap metal and firewood:)


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My understanding is that the .22s and the handguns, Remington US Model 1903 rifles were not WWII lend lease but directly purchased by the British Purchasing Commission. There is not doubt about Lend Lease arms marked "United States Property" such as the Savage No.4 Mk1 & 1* rifle, Smith and Wesson Victory .38/200 and Mossber 42B series of .22 rifles. I can't comment on the status of the M1917 rifle, BAR furnished to the British Home Guard. Thompson SMG were both pre and post Lend Lease.
 

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this is a cooey 82 trainer - the scope is not an alteration - used the screws that hold the rear ramp/rear peep sights - its reversable
 

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It is my estimate that no more than US$ 300-
Raul,
Thanks for that. I saw one at the Palm Beach gunshow last weekend for $300+ and thought that was a lot of money for that gun. I thought about making an offer to the seller but decided not to embarrass myself with a low-ball effort.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Here's my Cooey Mdl 82. It's in excellent condition and I acquired it a few years ago for $300.00, so I tend to agree with Raul's figure. That's not to say that they can't be found for less, but as aways, it's ultimately up to the seller and the buyer to establish what's it"s worth at that particular time and place.




I only wish I had that dang accessory peep sight. Someday, I'll trip over one:)


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Better late than never .... hopefully ... ;)

I would say that this was unquestionably a British purchase, since that is a British War Department broad arrow marking. In fact, Canada never applied the broad arrow (by itself) as a government/military acceptance or ownership mark, and by the time of the late 1930's/early 1940's had long been exclusively using the distinctive "C-broadarrow" mark on military firearms and other military stores:
 

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i put $100 into the rifle and a bit over $30 into the replacement parts - sling swivels & rear peep sight , but im seeing the advertised for $300+ , i wont part with mine for less than that - its a deadly shot at 75yds ,



even with my old eyes
 
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