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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Attached is alithograph I picked up years ago which still has a prominent place in mycollection room. Fraught with tension, it seems to symbolize a revolt of somekind, some place. The only seeming clue is the black hat and white gloves. Ihave not been able to identify, or even verify that it depicts a possible real situation.

Would appreciate any educated guesses or furtherclues; I am stumped. Thank you.

southridge


 

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Okay, going by the clothes, I'm going to guess its from any of a dozen uprisings/revolutions in 1848 and 1849 that swept Europe from Paris to Denmark to Poland, Hungary, and most notably Germany.

The buildings give me a Denmark or German "vibe" (of the countries I know that so revolutions in that period) but that's as close as I can guess.
 

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Francs-tireurs in Alsace-Lorraine during the 1970 Franco-Prussian War?

1848 and I'd anticipate barricades... For that matter, le Commune de Paris 1871 would similarly have barricades.
 

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The woman on the steps appears to be Dutch by the dress and cap
 

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T me, living here in Yoorup, it has the look of the Mediterranean rather than NW Europe. The mostly with small white buildings are more likely to be found in the South and the North West, and the sahses around the waist are not Germain.

I'll do a bit of digging here - I'm intrigued.

tac
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you all for your interest and responses. I must admit that when I bought the picture, it said "Italy" to me, but so far, no proof. I still think the hat and gloves are a clue. No markings on the picture, no artist's name. daveccarlson, thanks for the additional picture - very interesting. Again, thanks.

southridge
 

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Mystery Solved.

This painting depicts Rupricht Humpersnort of the Tyrolean town of Ober-Belchenburg. Following the Ausgleich of 1867, and the new dual monarchy within Austria-Hungary, oppressive taxes were imposed upon all conglomerate forms of extruded pork products. Being partial to Leberkäse, Herr Humpersnort demonstrated and when his objection fell on deaf ears, he resorted to revolution.

Not known for their marksmanship, the Ober-Belchenburg Home Guard inflicted casualties only upon an unfortunate postman and a stray dog. Herr Humpersnort was without powder for his fowler but spread panic amongst the populace by pointing his weapon and shouting "Ka Boom!" Frau Humpersnort, a rather histrionic woman even by her own husband's standards, fell out with "the vapors" and threatened to leave him.

Herr Humpersnort's famous reply was later immortalized on a monument in the town's square dedicated to all Liver Cheese loving married men, "This is a war woman! Lovest thou Liver Cheese? Lovest thou me? Move back to your ugly old mother's and take your damned little dog with you!"

The Leberkäse Putsch, as it was thereafter known, is celebrated annually in the town to this day every first weekend in October with drunken singing, beer, tuba bands, and men dancing around in funny shorts while smacking each other on their bottoms....much like all other Fall festivals in the region.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
J.Stein-

I've been there! Just had no idea what I was celebrating. Great piece - thanks for a solution to the mystery. The Leberkaese Putsch is indeed a little-known episode outside of Ober-Belchenburg - or Mittel-Belchburg or Unter-Belchenburg. See you at the next Fest?

rupricht southridge
 

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J.Stein-

I've been there! Just had no idea what I was celebrating. Great piece - thanks for a solution to the mystery. The Leberkaese Putsch is indeed a little-known episode outside of Ober-Belchenburg - or Mittel-Belchburg or Unter-Belchenburg. See you at the next Fest?

rupricht southridge
It will be my honor to smack your leder-hosen clad bottom sir.

Noch Eins Beir!
 

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Noch eines bier, bitte! Und mehr Leberkaese!!

Ha-ha. Very funny/ Sehr lustig!

"Mein hut er hat drei ecken ... und so weiter..."

@southridge: Now that you mention it, it just might be an image originally for the Italian Risorgimento. One of the many wars and conflicts with the Austrians in Italy.

My only point was that the image itself--arresting, certainly--was reused in a German periodical and given the German title "Der Franktireur" and used to illustrate the general viciousness of those gnarly bier-swilling and chocolate-eating duplicitous Belgians who just don't seem to realize that they must no longer resist.

19th to early 20th century peasant attire does have a certain sameness to it... Just don't tell European nationalists that lest your lederhosen-clad bottom really get smacked!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
daveccarlson-

My Italian chum says that the picklehauben were not a part of the Risorgimento and suggested that the picture represents the French welcoming the Germans during WWI. Change to Belgians for final accuracy. The article seems to indicate that the Germans were complaining about the lone Belgian shooters and their dum-dum bullets. True!? Thanks again for locating the info; I really appreciate it. Always nice to know "why."

southridge
 
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