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Platinum Bullet Member
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A new/repaired bolt, stock, barrel, hardware and repro scope mount installed are do-able at considerable cost but just out of curiosity how would you take care of the problem around the rear site that bubba installed?

As an aside.....
Knew a guy once back in the day when Mauser's were a dime a dozen...he would purchase the guns, strip them and just collect the receivers & bolts for the different type of markings and Crests. Had a whole wall of them and sold off the parts cheap.

Collection looked pretty neat at the time but he spent the last 15 years of his life purchasing gun parts to put them back together one at a time. Never heard such language used by some one who was in the Air Corps. Seems he had some really unusual and rare type 'receivers'.

That bubba urge drives some people ....mad.
 

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Platinum Bullet Member with clusters
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Shah, a little tig welding goes a long way. A good welder can fix that. The bolt handle bugs me. It appears to have been lengthened and bending exaggerated. If true and my ole eyes aren't deceiving me, a section has to be cut out of the handle, angle changed slightly, then butt welded back in place. Yuk, but doable. Think I'd rather go backpacking than restore this one.
 

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I was thinking about that. I would remove the site, mill the dovetail true, insert a matching piece of steel. TIG weld the edges and maybe heat it in the furnace to fuse everything properly. Check the hardness, re-temper if necessary. Then I think I would cut the new mum with the laser, and hand work the edges of the laser cut. Or go down the road to bug a friend to cut the mum on his 3d mill. polish and refinish. Not the world's simplest job.
toad
 

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Silver Bullet member
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I was thinking about that. I would remove the site, mill the dovetail true, insert a matching piece of steel. TIG weld the edges and maybe heat it in the furnace to fuse everything properly. Check the hardness, re-temper if necessary. Then I think I would cut the new mum with the laser, and hand work the edges of the laser cut. Or go down the road to bug a friend to cut the mum on his 3d mill. polish and refinish. Not the world's simplest job.
toad
Recut or otherwise restore the mum and you will have crossed the line from "restore" to "fake"; JMHO.

All in all for the money and time you will/can spend on this one you can find a receiver that is not screwed up.
 

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I guess there is some debate about restoration vs conservation vs reconstruction. I think I have a pretty good handle on the differences. I have never presented my work as anything but what it truly is, except to test myself. I have never sold an item my company has reconstructed without full disclosure of the scope of work done. Mostly, my work is strict conservation. stabilizing an artifact, cleaning without damage, doing nothing that cannot be undone. I went to a good college to learn those techniques. But sometimes customers have an item that they want brought back to new, or damage repaired. That we can do. Particularly with firearms to be fired, or aviation-related items to be flown in period aircraft. Now, as far as this Japanese rifle goes, it would not be very economical to bring it to me and pay my people for the repairs I discussed. But maybe if you had such a rifle, and for whatever sentimental reasons you wanted or needed it back to the way it was when Grandpa kept it in his study, before uncle bubba got it and messed it up. Sometimes it is not about economics or historical purity. On the other hand, if I think you are bringing something in with the intent of selling it later as mint, I do not want your business. I already have more work than I can do. I think that those people with the skills and equipment to do restoration work at the highest levels do not need to engage in fraud or dishonesty. There is plenty of legitimate work out there, and no angry customers trying to track you down when they discover the truth. That being said, I have to be honest and admit that I have seen my work being misrepresented at auctions, although rarely. In one instance the customer had passed away, and the item had changed hands a couple of times. It can be a complicated issue. toad
 
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