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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I ran across a horribly bubba'd M39 at a pawn shop a few days ago. It is a 1944 SAKO, no bluing remaining at all, and the stock has been completely covered with some kind of duct tape with a camouflage pattern. The bore was dirty but lots of rifling remain. Were it not for the fact I have a nice 1944 SAKO already, and just paid my property taxes, I would have paid the $100 they want for it on the spot.

I am not a collector; I shoot what I have, but the idea of leaving it to fate bothers me.
So, what are the recommendations?
1. Forget it
2. Buy it for parts
3. Attempt a restoration

Regarding option 3, should I leave the metal bare or have it parkerized (rather than reblued.)
 

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If the metal is still intact, and it has not been drilled or tapped, $100 is okay. It will likely cost another $100 to $150 to get another stock and stock hardware. (I think one of the Sponsors has unfinished stocks for $80.)

For a good shooter, $100 is good for an M39. For a restoration project, not so much. Complete good condition M39's can still be had for under $200, with really nice ones in practically unissued condition for under $300.

It's not uncommon for a M39 to have little or no bluing left, but 'restoration' and 'parkerized' don't quite belong in the same sentence for Mosins.
 

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Logic says unless you already have the parts needed to restore it then let it go. Parts are going through the roof lately so unless you feel a real need (I have at times) to restore this rifle and are a collector leave this baby to someone who is. Project rifles are a blast but they sap money and take way to much time to be worthwhile in the current market. You would be very unlikely to be anything less than $100 behind the market value of the rifle unless you bought the necessary parts to do the job years ago at better prices. I have made a vow to have only parts rifles and finished rifles in my posession for awhile here. Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Logic says unless you already have the parts needed to restore it then let it go. Parts are going through the roof lately so unless you feel a real need (I have at times) to restore this rifle and are a collector leave this baby to someone who is. Project rifles are a blast but they sap money and take way to much time to be worthwhile in the current market. You would be very unlikely to be anything less than $100 behind the market value of the rifle unless you bought the necessary parts to do the job years ago at better prices. I have made a vow to have only parts rifles and finished rifles in my posession for awhile here. Bill
Thanks for the advice.

I went through the restoration drill in November when I picked up a very dirty and neglected M27. I got a cleaning rod (M39), since it was missing, and receiver screws since the originals were cheesed up. The total cost of parts was comparatively trivial compared to the time spent cleaning it up. The end result, however, was worth it; I have a nice shooter with a lot of history.

The bubba'd M39's stock may be OK underneath the tape, but prudence says expect gouges and cracks. I would want to parkerize it to control rust. To me the value of an M39 is its shooting quality. However, fiscal responsibility dictates frugality at this time.

I'll check the pawn shop in a month or two; if it is still there I'll reconsider.
 

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By your description, you did not say the stock has been cut, merely covered with tape. If the stock's not cut, that's a no brainer.

If the stock is cut, I personally would purchase it because the barreled action is probably a good shooter, but it's basically a tossup of if you want to engage in a project or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
By your description, you did not say the stock has been cut, merely covered with tape. If the stock's not cut, that's a no brainer.

If the stock is cut, I personally would purchase it because the barreled action is probably a good shooter, but it's basically a tossup of if you want to engage in a project or not.
The stock seems to be complete, i.e. has not been sporterized. If it were a VKT I would have taken it as a "brother in arms" for my SAKO. Anyhow, I will give it another look if it is still there when my finances improve.
 

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I would get it.

The barreled action alone is worth the price. If the stock has not been cut up, and the receiver has not been drilled, then all it would likely need is some elbow grease to return it to good shooting condition.

Considering what these rifles went through, I would not be upset at some dings, gouges and scratches.
 

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I would pick it up. I really don't have a problem with the price of parts because, I am able to tread stock work for parts.
Project guns are fun, I am working on 2 M91's, a 1929 Dragoon, 1934 Tula 91/30 and a No.4 Mk1* Savage Enfield right now.
If you get it and the stock is damaged, I offer great deals to members on repair work and will also do some horse treading for the work I do.
Just ask Vaarok to see the Hikem handguard I saved for him.
 

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Tell you what. If it is complete, only with the tape on the stock, you guy buy it.

If you end up not liking it, I'll buy it from you for what you have in it plus S&H to my FFL.

A complete shootable M39 for the price of a 91/30 refurb is too good to let go.
 

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Hey, Don't give-up because of the duct tape!

I wound-up with an M1 Carbine that I had owned, years ago, in a deal where a guy owed me money and gave me this duct-tape covered Carbine. I took it apart and found my Service Number engraved on the gas block (as required to store it on the base where I was stationed). I used a red cloth grease rag and deisel fuel and the dried glue rubbed right off! I figured that I had nothing to lose, so I tried it, and it worked. The stock was a little fuzzy, afterward, but 0000 steel wool remedied that, and she's back to looking like she's new! I realize that some might balk at this treatment, but it saved the old girl, ya know?

Just peel the tape off, then rub her down with diesel. If that's all that's wrong with it, heck, I'd love to have her! ;)
 

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Hmmm I for some reason thought it was a cut stock rifle and I might have to alter my opinion to and say go for it at that price too! If you can tell the rifle and stock are not cut and drilled or anything yeah go for it. Like the people are saying the tape can be taken off and the stock cleaned and saved. Why on earth did I think it was cut? Sorry getting old I guess? My Bad! Bill
 

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If it takes a few hours to clean a rifle it is time well spent. You have something for your labor. You watch a football game for a few hours what do you have when you get done?

Nothing unless you are cleaning a rifle at the same time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Re: "If it takes a few hours to clean a rifle it is time well spent. You have something for your labor. You watch a football game for a few hours what do you have when you get done?"

Indeed. I'd rather spend my time (abundant) and money (not so abundant) on things of lasting value. That is why I have a pair of Finn's (M39, M27) and no digital camera. My only problem with the bubba'd M39 is a severe shortage of cash after paying my property taxes. And my rescued 110 lb German shepherd has gotten used to eating regular meals.

The M27 I picked up a few months ago is a prime example of time well spent. I described my efforts in the earlier thread "sewerpipe bore." At a recent range session, while spotting for my shooting buddy while he broke in his newly rebarelled M1 Garand, I fired a clip through the M27 at the 300 yard target and got a group in the 10 ring. When my 61 year old eyes can group an 80-year old Winter War combat veteran over open iron sights at 300 yards, that is really rewarding.
 
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