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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Attached are some photos of three British revolvers that were used in WWI & WWII. They aren't as romantic as Lugers and P.38, which are my first and second military handgun loves in that order, but they do represent a major participant in both world wide conflicts . They have significant roles in the pages of history and should not be ignored. Samples of them
should be included in anyone's collection of weapons from those eras. A significant feature in their favor is can be purchased at a fraction of the cost of a Luger or P.38.

They are Webley Mark VI . cal. 455 (converted to .45 ACP), Webley Mark IV cal. .38/200 and Enfield cal. .38/200. I realize the Mark VI is not a collector's piece but is (was) a gift from my wife upon graduation from Tulsa University with an engineering degree in 1962. In those days I was more interested in shooting a big revolver (purchase price $19.95) than I was in collecting. Don't you wish those days could return for more reasons than gun prices. It is one of my most cherished pieces and with .45 Auto Rim brass using 230 grain lead bullets it shoots to point of aim at 18 of my paces.
 

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Reliability, low capacity but a wonderful (abet ugly) club when the six shots are gone. The Brits stamp more ugly stuff on their weapons than Century arms imports!
Eye of the beholder, my friend. Eye of the beholder.

I've thought Webleys look beautiful from the moment I saw my first one.

OP, if you cross-post in the British Gun Pub, you'll get far more interest I think. Nice examples you've got there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
PAshutr3 ---- Very nice example of the Enfield. Mine doesn't have the Enfield markings yours has on its frame. I see yours has 1940 date on the frame. Mine has "44" stamped on the barrel rib in line with "cal. 38".
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
2P Steel 6 ---- I've always thought they contained their own beauty only in a different way than Lugers, P.38's etc. The big Webley's are beautiful man stoppers and in that kind of beauty they "shined".
 

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Recently, I saw a remark how by in large, the average Brit in WW2 actually preferred the S&W Victory 380/200's to the homegrown Enfields & Webleys. That would seem logical.
IMO this makes sense: No guy wants an ugly date or to carry an ugly revolver!:) I have personally never been able to comprehend how the Brits. can build such classically beautiful double shotguns and such ugly revolvers and rifles(think Enfield here)!
Jim
 

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Recently, I saw a remark how by in large, the average Brit in WW2 actually preferred the S&W Victory 380/200's to the homegrown Enfields & Webleys. That would seem logical.
Indeed. Lighter, balance better, and it is a toss-up whether you like swing-out cylinder or top-break. In my experience, the S&Ws usually have better triggers, DA or SA, but - well, individual guns vary.

PS - I like those .22 conversions for the Webleys and Enfields. The Brits were one up on us with those.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thank you all for your replies on the Brit. Revolvers. I was afraid I was the only member who liked the Brit's big guns. The .22 Webley is especially interesting and good looking. I have an Erma .22 cal. conversion with an 8 round magazine for a Luger in a wooden box. There is a Waffenamp stamp on the lid of the box.
 

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Great stuff; first time I have seen the .22 conversions and the revolver Martin posted is just plain sexy! I'm always impressed with the great stuff you find up North!
 

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Recently, I saw a remark how by in large, the average Brit in WW2 actually preferred the S&W Victory 380/200's to the homegrown Enfields & Webleys. That would seem logical.
Not I. Given the same anemic round, of course; a .38 spl would tip the balance.

On the 380/200, though, the Webley's got better loading and ejection, and the sights are far better for combat shooting. I always need to search around for the sights on Smiths with that narrow rear notch.
 
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