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Greetings,

I have got a incomplete BRITISH BULLDOG but it doesn't have some parts like rod and hammer assembly set. Is there anyway to produce that parts using factory blueprints as reference? I already looked in all over internet, all these parts already out of stock. If you have any info, please send me an update on that post.
 

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:"British Bulldog " was a generic name,generally used on Belgian guns(sometimes on British guns)......what proof marks does it have .....have a look on Google for Belgian proofs.......even if it has British proofs ,could still be a Belgian gun. ..Anyway ,regardless of where its made,your best chance of finding parts is want ads on forums,or on ebay. The only way you will get dimensioned plans is to draw them yourself.
 

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There were so many makers of these cute little revolvers, the Belgian gunmakers [usually unmarked] copied the Webley revolvers, even some American companies [I seem to remember an American bulldog]. The Webleys are the grail of these and very collectible. They were the first to make the popular Pug and Bulldog models. Initially I think they were only in large caliber but eventually were chambered in smaller calibers. I’ve had a couple over the years, a .32 or .44 and a .450 caliber [stamped British Lion on the topstrap]. Look for a broken gun like yours to rob parts from. Enjoy your quest.
 

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Greetings,

I have got a incomplete BRITISH BULLDOG but it doesn't have some parts like rod and hammer assembly set. Is there anyway to produce that parts using factory blueprints as reference? I already looked in all over internet, all these parts already out of stock. If you have any info, please send me an update on that post.
I am afraid you aren't going to like this, but the chances of finding suitable parts, without modificastion, is low. Even if you could find someone parting out a revolver by the same maker, and of the same size, timing etc, is likely to be a matter of hand finishing. Not to mention that in both Biormingham and Gelgium the trade was a mass of subcontractors, outworkers, bought-in guns, etc. Even a part made onj the same workbench may have been finished a shade too small, to fit the rest of that revolver, than will fit the rest of yours.

It is possible to make and time a hammer, with nothing but empty space and pictures of the parts. I've done it for my Spirlet revolver. I can't find pictures of Bulldog or RIC internals at the moment, but a picture from someone else's revolver would be useful.

It may be that like some cap and ball revolvers, double-action cocking is produced by a sort of extra hand attached to the trigger. A little dogleg at the top would engage with a hole or notch in the hammer, and would be cammed out of it by the breast of the hammer. This would be simpler to make than a spring-loaded pawl, like that of the Spirlet and most modern revolvers.

You have to fine-tune the height of the cylinder-rotating hand, and either the length of the sear-tip, to make sure that single-action cocking occurs when the hammer is rotated just a tiny distance further than it would be by doubble-action. Both have to be when the cylinder is rotated correctly into line. But just think how you will feel when you have done it. As long as you don't let any foolish notions of economic worth intrude into your thinking.

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Spirlet hammer in construction without caption.jpg
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