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I picked this up recently despite knowing nothing about it, because it was way too interesting not to. All mismatched, and it has no special markings that I can find. Fits a fairly modern Czech 26.5mm flare just fine (my Chobert Gras conversion requires a slightly narrower rim diameter than the Czech flares). There is a hole bored in the stub of the stock; not sure why. Does anybody know anything about these? All I can find it that it is vaguely similar to a German conversion documented in Huon & Barrellier's Lebel book. If anyone has any information on these, I would be very interested!

Automotive exhaust Muffler Steel Metal
Gun Rifle Trigger Firearm Shotgun
Gun Firearm Rifle Trigger Shotgun
Muffler Auto part
 

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Ian:

I probably shouldn't post this because because I probably won't be able to find the copies but I am almost certain that I have photocopies of an article covering this Lebel conversion (along with other French flare guns) that appeared in a French language gun and militaria magazine.

I have always copied and archived any research material and photographs related to my many and diverse fields of interest and I borrowed a pile of these magazines from a friend almost thirty years ago. I must have copied a couple of hundred pages on dozens of different military arms and militaria. Subjects virtually never covered back then in any English language publications.

That friend?

A guy by the name of Duncan. Perhaps you know him? ;)

The good news is that if my memory is accurate, and the article I am thinking of did include coverage of your gun, I still have it. I never throw anything away.

The bad news is that I am going to have a very hard time finding the article in question because I never throw anything away and have boxes of old papers, books, and magazines in every room of my house.

If and when I succeed in finding the correct box of old dusty papers I'll let you know.

And tell your dad I said hello!
 

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Between January and May of 1932, the French state weapon factories did a series of tests on steel pieces exposed to rain, salted rain, bathed in water, scratched by leather and so on to see what the effects of these would be. They then treated these surfaces with different kinds of treatments and two different type of phosphatations stood out as excellent possibilities to be used. The first was made by Parker Rust Proof Co, which was introduced in France in May of 1927 under the name of Parcosel, later called as parkérisation and other by a French firm named O.F.A.M. (No more detail about the name exists at this time) named as Ofamisation. A report was put out that said that more tests had to be done on real weapons with real use in the field to determine which would be best for use, in the end parkerization won out. The black enamel paint finish used during the interwar period was called Parkolac or Parcolac which was also used by the National Railway Company, SNCF, on railroad steam engines and tenders.
 
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