Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Platinum Bullet Member
Joined
·
2,618 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I came across an all matching Brazilian Mauser today. DWM Berlin and a Springfield Armory Genesco import stamp. It has the "mum" cartouche on the stock which is matching. The SN#7337 is on all parts that should be numbered. The odd B stamp seems to be on all parts. The bore is very good. It has the correct sling and quick release rear swivel. There is a small vv stamp on the barrel. The color of the receiver is odd..almost plum turning brown. Was this refinished or is it the original receiver in the white that has become tarnished? Any ideas on value? Worth $360?
 

·
Silver Bullet Member
Joined
·
925 Posts
$360 is a little steep for one in that condition. I picked up a Springfield Armory import about 8 months ago for $275, same early stock cartouche with a broken barrel band spring. Mine had an in the white, albeit dull, receiver, and non-matching numbers (bolt mismatched). The patina on that receiver kind of hurts the value in my opinion, for that price anyway. You should be able to get a shiny receiver with mostly matching numbers with a nice bore for that kind of money.
 

·
Platinum Bullet Member
Joined
·
2,618 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This one has all matching numbers, including the bolt....which is a major factor in my decision process and worth the $85 difference between $275 and $360.. A shiny receiver with mostly matching numbers is not very appealing.
 

·
Silver Bullet Member
Joined
·
925 Posts
This one has all matching numbers, including the bolt....which is a major factor in my decision process. A shiny receiver with mostly matching numbers is not very appealing.
If it wasn't a Brazilian, M1908, I would agree with you, but these are the most common South American contract rifle to come across, and in excellent condition. One rarely pays more than $500 for a pristine nearly as - issued M1908 (Less than Argentine's and much much less than Peruvians of similar condition). Since the receiver should be in the white, and shiny, I personally make the original appearance a higher priority than all matching numbers. But, that is entirely my opinion, and you should add to your collection what fits your interest!

If matching numbers is what you go for, then you are going to place a higher value on that then I would (It's not a deal breaker for me on these South American contracts, if the condition is correct). But, I would factor in the receiver being brown/patina, and subtract for that condition. How much, I can't say.
 

·
Platinum Bullet Member
Joined
·
2,618 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
As I described the rifle initially..all matching numbers, very good bore...and I should get a "shiny receiver with mostly matching numbers and a nice bore for that kind of money"...huh?
 

·
Silver Bullet Member
Joined
·
925 Posts
As I described the rifle initially..all matching numbers, very good bore...and I should get a "shiny receiver with mostly matching numbers and a nice bore for that kind of money"...huh?
I don't place that much additional value for matching numbers, when the condition overall suffers (i.e. a brown receiver), at least with South American Mausers.
 

·
Platinum Bullet Member
Joined
·
2,618 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
There is an old saying amongst some collectors.."Don't cut the mustard." Could you perhaps help me in my quandary by posting a pic of your miss matched Model 1908 with the shiny receiver so I might compare it to the one I saw today? I will know what to look for after having a basis for comparison.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
I place tremendous value on all matching. An all matching Sistema Colt is worth $200 more to me than one with a mismatched magazine, barrel, slide, or replaced grips. Conten is ahead of the curve. Head to the blackpowder section and compare vaues on an 1840's era Springfield Armory musket with all original parts compared to a mismatched one of the same era.


I guess if you are more a shooter than a collector those mismatched mausers are no big deal. I personally won't even consider one for my collection unless its all original and matching. If it's mint or near mint I won't even shoot it. It's not because I am a snob, I just think I owe it to future generations to keep it that way. I also give away broken arrowheads I fine. To me a mismatch mauser is kind of like a broken arrowhead that has been altered to a scraper. I know it's period and the same knapper probably did it, but I would still place more value on the one with its original shape.
 

·
Diamond Bullet Member
Joined
·
1,197 Posts
Coneten,
If the crest is reasonably good, and the stock is at least 'good', I'd have to consider it. While others say they are so common, I see very few in my area, in any condition.
If it fits in your collection, and you like it, that's all that matters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
I think what he meant by "matching doesn't really matter" is that the majority of these rifles are matching, to give an example why are RC Kar98ks cheaper than all matching Kar98ks? Because there are so many of them! Matching numbers is so damn common on these rifles that collectors don't jump up and down with glee when they find out it's matching.

I live down under so I pay a steeper price but I bought my 1908 in an absolutely mint condition, stock has one ding, original finish, bore is mint, the metal parst are all in the white although not mirror shiny and of course it's all matching, I paid $1150 for it and I don't regret it. The one thing I love about Australia though is that our importers never mark the rifles (any rifles pre 1996), now they have to have red paint put on the fire side of the safety.
 

·
Platinum Bullet Member
Joined
·
2,618 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I think what he meant by "matching doesn't really matter" is that the majority of these rifles are matching, to give an example why are RC Kar98ks cheaper than all matching Kar98ks? Because there are so many of them! Matching numbers is so damn common on these rifles that collectors don't jump up and down with glee when they find out it's matching.

I live down under so I pay a steeper price but I bought my 1908 in an absolutely mint condition, stock has one ding, original finish, bore is mint, the metal parst are all in the white although not mirror shiny and of course it's all matching, I paid $1150 for it and I don't regret it. The one thing I love about Australia though is that our importers never mark the rifles (any rifles pre 1996), now they have to have red paint put on the fire side of the safety.
I have a different outlook on matching numbers I suppose. I cannot count the times I have passed an a very nice example of a Swedish M96..if it had just one miss matched barrel band or a floor plate. If it were priced at $120 less than fair market value I would not touch it. A Swede 94-14 carbine is another matter and if the price was right I might accept a miss matched bolt. Force matched numbers and mixed up parts are one reason why I will pass on RC Mod98's..but I will buy an original matching Mod.98 with a miss matched bolt if the price is right and the rifle has not been otherwise messed with. Finnish Mosins break all of the rules and if it is a nice example of an M27 or other scarcer variant I will accept a miss matched bolt. I guess we all have a different perspective.
 

·
Silver Bullet Member
Joined
·
925 Posts
Conetan, I think you hit the nail on the head, and the point I was trying to make, with your comments about RC k98's vs original matching k98k's and a Swedish M96 vs a 94-14. Scarcity. A lot more of a premium is placed on matching numbers the more scarce that particular model of rifle is. For example, a matching example of a Peruvian M1909 is like finding the holy grail, because they were shipped over separated from the bolts! Brazilian M1908's are so common relative to other South American contract rifles, that the premium paid for matching numbers isn't going to be nearly as high. But, again, because there are so many Brazilian M1908's, you also have to take into consideration the overall condition. If this was a rare beast, condition wouldn't matter as much, but since it's not all that rare, you don't have as much of a price premium on these. Now with all that said, if the Brazilian you are looking at looks exactly like mine, and is all matching numbers, than the price you quoted, I would have to say, would be a great price in my book. I would just like to see the condition of the receiver and the patina. It's hard making a value judgment without a photo.

I wasn't trying to make waves, just offering up an opinion. The Brazilians are what I encounter most at gun shows when I see a South American contract, and the condition ranges all over the map, but I rarely see them priced for much more than $500 in VG+ condition (not museum quality, then things get crazy).
 

·
Silver Bullet Member
Joined
·
12,176 Posts
Somebody ought to make 7mm, 29 inch long barrels to fit the 1908. They are such nice rifles but most have sewerpipe bores. I am a shooter more than a collector.
 

·
Silver Bullet Member
Joined
·
12,176 Posts
$500 was a LOT of money 25 years ago!!!! I bought a "good" one from Springfield Sporters right about then. It keyholed at 25 yds, so I replaced the barrel with a NOS Mauser replacement that was available for $40 at the time and refinished it.

I still have that one. It still is amazing to shoot. There is just something about a 29" Mauser............
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top